RICKS BOTTLE ROOM.COM

~ ALWAYS IN PURSUIT OF GREAT GLASS ~ © 2007 ~

LOCAL STUFF

PLEASE ACKNOWLEDGE MY SITE IF USING ANY CONTENT, PICTURES & TEXT. THANK YOU

WELCOME....THIS IS MY LOCAL BOTTLES AND OTHER RELATED ITEMS WHICH I AM ALWAYS LOOKING FOR MORE.....GOT ANY FOR SALE OR LOOKING FOR TRADES?. IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS ON ANYTHING,FEEL FREE TOO POST IT IN THE COMMENTS PAGE,CLICK ON THE CONTACT ME TABS AT LEFT ON EACH PAGE AND I GET THEM INSTANTLY ON MY BLACKBERRY, ALL ARE ANSWERED, OR EMAIL ME 

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I AM ALWAYS LOOKING TO BUY OR TRADE LOCAL BOTTLES ECT FROM SARATOGA, BALLSTON SPA,TROY ,ALBANY,GLENS FALLS AND SURROUNDING TOWNS.I HAVE MANAGED TO GET SOME OF MY TOP WANTED LOCALS, STILL LOOKING FOR W.E. HAGAN TROY COBALT PANELED AND ALWAYS INTERESTED IN COLORED OR SCARCE LOCAL MEDICINES, BLOBS & WHISKEYS. THANKS.

[email protected] 

  RARE QUANDT BREWING,SWIRL BASE ~ TROY  ~  J.E. DANAHER WHISKEY ~ ALBANY

 

 

  















 HERE IS A LOCAL AND VERY HARD TO GET QUANDT BREWING IN EMERALD GREEN WITH THE SWIRL BASE. THESE HAVE MADE IT ON TO THE RARE LIST AND PRICES ON THEM HAVE SOARED, SO I WAS SUPER HAPPY TO END UP WITH THIS PERFECT EXAMPLE FOR A GOOD PRICE TOO.

HERE IS A VERY HARD TO COME BY LOCAL WHISKEY FROM ALBANY NEW YORK, J.E.DANAHER WITH RIBBED LADYS LEG NECK. DATED TO 1875-80 RANGE. I HAVE ONLY SEEN A FEW OF THIS BOTTLE COME AROUND AND AM STILL SEARCHING FOR ANYTHING ON THE WHISKEY PORTION OPERATIONS OF THE COMPANY. ONE OF MY FAVORITES FOR SURE AND MINT.

 Adam and Andrew Quandt from Troy NY. The family came from Germany in the 1850 era. built and ran a Brewery on River Street in Troy called Quandt Brewing Company.

SEE MY BLOBS PAGE FOR PICTURES OF 2 MORE QUANDT VARIANTS INCLUDING A & A QUANDT

Their father's name was William. Mother was Margaret   Leo Kirchner Troy, NY 1859 - 1877  Andrew & Adam Quandt Troy, NY 1877 - 1884  Quandt Brewing Co. Troy, NY 1884 - 1920   Quandt Brewing Co., Inc. Troy, NY 1933 - 1942

QUANDT BREWING WAS IN BANKRUPTCY IN 1941 AND ALL FIXTURES ECT WERE AUCTIONED OFF.


ABIGAIL M. LITTLEFIELD PHARMICIST &  CHARLES HEIMSTREET, DRUGGIST  ~ TROY N.Y.

TWO OF MY LATEST LOCALS, ONES I HAVE WANTED FOR A LONG TIME AND BOTH IN MINT CONDITION "C. HEIMSTREET, TROY N.Y." I JUST GOT...AND "ABIGAIL M. LITTLEFIELD" THESE ARE A FAVORITES FOR SURE AND ONES I HAVE WANTED TO ADD FOR QUITE SOME TIME.

 Abigail M.Littlefield

The products shown are manufactured in the pharmacy of Miss Abigail M. Littlefield, Troy, N. Y., and they illustrate what intelligent and persistent effort may accomplish in this direction. The formulas used are original with Miss Littlefield and the whole line is the result of work extending over several years. These preparations have already attained more than merely a local reputation.

The commencement exercises of the Albany College of Pharmacy, a department of Union University, were held Tuesday evening, March 10, in Odd Fellows' Hall, Albany. A class of twenty-one was graduated. In addition, three students, whose terms of apprenticeship were not completed, were given certificates of proficiency. Holding's Orchestra furnished the music for the occasion. After prayer was offered, Prof. Tucker, president of the faculty, delivered the address of welcome. He was followed by Dr. A. V. V. Kaymoud, president of the university, who conferred the degree of Ph. G. upon the following: George D. Albee, Walton; Louis S. Allen, Albany; Morey J. Balcome, Canton; Fred R. Barker, Brandon, Vt.; John C. Bearcroft, Fonda; William F. Brauch", Potsdam; Clarence W. Briggs, Malone; Joseph S. Cantarow, Albany; Robert V. Coon, Jr., Troy; Ralph

B. Channel, Malone; William W. Turbeck, Gloversville; Felix A. Gosselin, North Adams, Mass.; William H. Grogan, Albany; Frederic Hall, Albuny; George

C. Hogun, Albany; Perley D. Kinney, Poultney, Vt.; Thomas J. Mulhern, Waterford; Frederick W. Schneider, Troy; William J. Straight, Lansingburg- George S. Wheeler,
Mount Upton, and Benjamin F. Vvinegar, Jr., Auburn, N. Y. Wilbert S. Condon, of Gloversville; Horace B. Cooper, of Canandaigua, and Arthur Decker, of Monticello, were given certificates of proficiency, to be exchanged for diplomas upon completion of the term of apprenticeship.

The address to the graduates was made by Prof. Edward W. Wetmore, of the Normal College. As usual, the boys were told that they were just beginning their education, instead of completing it, and that they must not think all further effort unnecessary.

Clarence W. Briggs was the class operator. His address was well conceived, well written and well delivered. It had largely to do with the history of pharmacy. It
served well to enlighten the 900 people assembled as to the function and professional plane of the pharmacy of to-day. Much interest, of course, centered in the presentation of prizes. De Bauni Van Aiken, secretary of the faculty, made the awards. The $20 faculty prize for best final examination was given to Fred R. Barker. Honorable mention was made of Felix A. Gosselin, Arthur Decker and Clarence W. Briggs. The $20 alumni prize for best work in the pharmaceutical laboratory went to Clarence W. Briggs. Honorable mention was given to Felix A. Gosselin and Ralph B. Channell. The junior prize of $15, awarded for the best final examinations, was given to Miss Abigail M. Littlefield, Watervliet, Harris C. Whipple, Frank G. Palmer and Elmer H. Hosley received honorable mention.


Birth: 1846  Death: 1904  Family links: Spouse:   Edgar Littlefield (1837 - 1923)

CHARLES HEIMSTREET

Charles Heimstreet was listed as a druggist in Troy, New York from 1835 until his death in 1855. His brother Stephen joined the company in 1838 to manage the bottled-medicine line. By 1845, the business was called Heimstreet and Bigelow, and a few years later, was assumed by William E. Hagan, a former clerk in Heimstreet's store.

At some point in the 1860s, the New York wholesale druggist Demas Barnes became sole proprietor of Hagan's articles, and served as the commercial agent for Heimstreet's famous formula. Available in two bottle sizes, for 50 cents and one dollar, the product was sold by all "respectable dealers."

Heimstreet, Thomas B., M.D., was born in Troy, March 11, 1843. His father, Dr. Charles Heimstreet, was for many years a druggist in Troy, being the first prescription druggist in the city; he died in 1854; he was married to Miss Harriet ]. VValsh of Lansingburgh, N.Y., in 1838; she died in 1876. Thomas B. received his education at the common and private schools, Albany Medical College, and graduated from Bellevue Hospital Medical College in March, 1867, when he began practice in Troy. He has been one of the attending physicians of the Troy Hospital, and is a member of the Rensselaer County Medical Society, the New York State Medical Association, and the American Ornithologists' Union. He was librarian of the Troy Young Men's Association for nine years. In 1871 he married Miss Mary E. Quinta] of Fall River, Mass. .

Charles Heimstreet was listed as a Druggist in Troy New York from 1835 till 1855. His business was at 10 State Street. In 1845, the company was called Heimstreet & Bigelow (Edmond), Mfg Druggists. Starting in 1848, William E. Hagan began working with Heimstreet as a Clerk (see Hagan). The same year Bigelow was no longer listed.  The Wilsons also said that Heimstreet had died in 1855 and the company dissolved soon after.
Heimstreet's Inimitable Hair Coloring.

Advertisements of the period claimed Heimstreet's formula "does not act as a dye, but stimulates the natural secretion of coloring at the roots and thus restores its natural color." It was also said to eradicate dandruff, as well as promote hair growth and prevent it from falling out. Targeting both men and women, despondent customers were promised hope for their sickly hair.  "All persons troubled with premature baldness, or hair turning gray should not despair until they have tried Heimstreet."
 


Hagan took over as the Proprietor of the establishment from 1851 to 1861. In an ad on Oct 1, 1859, W.E. Hagan, Troy, NY already Proprietor, indicates fifteen years of experience. The label on some of the C. Heimstreet bottles said they contained "W.E. Hagan's Hair Coloring." It is not known when Hagan made this label change. At some point Demas Barnes took over proprietorship of Hagan's articles, including this hair coloring. He advertised the Hair Coloring in 1862. An ad in the 1875 John F. Henry, Curran & Co. catalog (view), listed two sizes of the bottles. In the 1885 McKesson & Robbin's catalog, I found a listing that called the product "Hagan's or Heimstreet's Hair Dye." The last reference I found to the product was in the 1898 National Druggist.

 FITCHETT, SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y.                   J.M.COLCORD,SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y.

     HERE ARE TWO OF MY FAVORITES IN MY LOCAL STUFF.

LEFT, 10 INCH TALL 1880S FITCHETT PHARMACIST 400  BROADWAY,SARATOGA SPRINGS NEW YORK IN SCRIPT. REGISTERED LISTINGS FROM 1887 AS I.P. FITCHETT BUT WALKER & FITCHETT BY 1893.BALLSTON SPA DRUGGIST WILLIAM H. QUINN ACQUIRED THE BUSINESS IN 1904.

I HAVE A FEW VARIANTS FROM BOTH OF THESE PHARMACIES

RIGHT,9 3/4 INCH J.M. COLCORD AND CO. PHARMACIST SARATOGA SPRINGS NEW YORK ALSO FROM 1880S

    

 

 I.P.FITCHETT

 Fitchett, Irving P., was born in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., January 29, 1867, and educated in the common schools there. He has been in the drug business since 1888, and came to Saratoga Springs in 1889. To his ability as a pharmacist he adds the advantage of a five years' study of medicine, having taken up that course while in the drug business; but instead of attending college, went into the drug business on his own account, intending to take up the study later on. He has one of the best equipped drug stores in the country and carries many specialties, including surgical appliances and physicians' supplies. Mr. Fitchett is regarded as one of Saratoga's most enterprising and successful business men.

 1909  Miss Gracia N. Anscombe, of Saratoga Springs, N. Y., who was graduated with this year's class at the Albany College of Pharmacy, first became acquainted with the drug business as bookkeeper and cashier for .1. P. Fitchett. which position she entered in 1903 after her graduation from high school. Later under Mr. Fltchett's successor. J. E. Quinn. Miss Anscombe took up the study of pharmacy, entering college In 1907. Miss Anscombe was a successful applicant for registration as a pharmacist at the April meeting of the New York Board of Pharmacy.

 

J, M. Colcord & Co., Druggists and Apothecaries, No. 388 Broadway, opposite the United States Hotel.?This house is noted for the reliahility of its merchandise, as well.as for the equitable and liberal methods of the management. The store occupied is large and commodious in dimensions, and is not only tasteful and systematic in all its arrangements, but also fully supplied with all needed facilities for carrying on the business in a prompt and efficient manner. The stock carried is large and comprehensive, embracing as lt does a full assortment of fresh, pure drugs and chemicals of all kinds, reputable patent medicines, druggists' sundries, physicians' supplies, fancy and toilet articles, etc., all of which may be purchased at reasonable prices, and are guaranteed to be as represented in every particular. The active member of the firm, Mr. J. M. Colcord, is a graduate of the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, and has had fifteen years' experience in all the branches of his profession. His father, Mr. S. M. Colcord, now retired from business life. is well-known in the drug trade, having for fourteen years been a member of the noted house of T. Metcalf & Co., Boston. Three expert assistants are employed by Mr. Colcord. A leading specialty is made of the prescription counter.

PHARMACEUTICAL PUZZLE PICTURE SOLVED.   1888 J. M. Colcord Gets the Prize.

Interest in the pharmaceutical puzzle picture, printed in our issue of October 10, ran very high. Solutions of the puzzle were received in large numbers from druggists all over the country. The first correct solution was mailed from Saratoga Springs, N. Y., on Sunday, October 10, and reached the office of the AmeriCan Druggist next day at noon. The winner of the prize is J. M. Colcord, of 388 Broadway, Saratoga Springs, N. Y., who gives the following reading:

1?-Sea-al-Arm-L?Calomel. 2?C-Low-ral?Chloral. 3?Pear-E-Gar-eye-C?Paregoric. 4?Nucks-vom-eye-cur?Nuxvomica. 5?Arson-eye-c?Arsenic.6?Witch-Hay-zl?Witch Hazel.7?'Car - bee- o- lick - ass?Carbolic Ac. (acid).8?Ball-Sam-Fur?Balsam Fir.

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ALBANY PHARMACEUTICAL CO. ~ ALBANY N.Y.

 
MY LATEST LOCAL PICK UP, PRETTY SCARCE AMBER "ALBANY PHARMACEUTICAL CO.  ALBANY N.Y."  THERE ARE NOT MANY OF THESE AROUND AND THIS ONE IS 7 INCHES TALL AND IN MINT CONDITION.
 
Albany Chemical Co., Manufacturers of Fluid Extracts, Elixirs, Chemicals, etc., Nos. 65 and 67 Green Street, G. Mlchaelis, Chemist, Wm. T. Mayer, Treasurer.—No department of commercial enterprise in the city of Albany is of more direct value and importance to the community than that in which the practical manufacturing chemist brings to bear his professional skill and experience. In this connection special reference is made in this commercial review of the city, to the Albany Chemical Co., whose offices and laboratory are located at Nos. 65 and 67 Green Street. This business was originally established in 1878 as the Albany Pharmaceutical Co., which was succeeded by Mr. G. Michaelis. Eventually in 1881 it was duly incorporated under the laws of New York, since which period it l,as obtained a liberal and influential patronage in all sections of the United States and Canada, owing to the superiority, purity and quality of its chemicals and preparations. The officers of the company are Mr. G. Michaelis, chemist, and Mr. Wm. T. Mayer, treasurer. The premises occupied comprise a*spacious four-story building, 40 J Kj feet in area, and three large rooms adjoining. The laboratories are admirably equipped with all tlie latest improved apparatus, appliances and machinery known to the trade. The Albany Chemical Co. manufacture largely, fluid extracts, elixirs, chemicals of all kinds, and a general line of pharmaceutical preparations. The company makes a specialty of producing large quan tities of mercurial ointment, solution of the chloride of iron, concentrated spirit of nitre, ether, chloroform, etc. They have a patent for the manufacture of chloroform, and turn out annually about half the quantity that is used in the United States. As is the case in -nearly all valuable patented processes, the Albany Chemical Co. were obliged to protect their patent in the United States courts. After about three years of constant litigation, the company obtained * decree and an injunction against the infringing parties, and also an order for an accounting with them. The company have reason to congratulate themselves on the outcome of Chis litigation, which was not only a vindication of their right to the protection of the patent laws, but involved a direct contest on purely chemical and scientific ground between the author of the process and such chemists as Ira Remsen, Dr. Chandler, Gustav Rumpt, and others who were retained by the opposite side for the purpose of upsetting the patent. In this contest Prof. Michaelis received very valuable aid from Prof. Henry Morton, of Stevens Institute, and the patent was sustained. The company offers no chloroform or other chemicals, which do not fully answer all he necessary requirements and tests. In fact all the chemicals and general pharmaceutical preparations of the Albany Chemical Co. are absolutely unrivalled for reliabllity, quality, and uniform excellence, and have no superiors in the American and European markets. Mr. G. Michaelis, the chemist, has had great experience, and possesses the high professional skill requisite for the preparation and manufacture of the company's various highly indorsed chemicals and specialties. He was born and educated in Germany. Mr. Michaelis is professor of chemistry, as applied to pharmacy, in the Albany College of Pharmacy; also a prominent member of the New York State Pharmaceutical Associa tion, American Pharmaceutical Association, and Albany Co. Pharmaceutical Society. Mr. Mayer, the treasurer, is a native of New York. Both Me&srs. Michaelis and Mayer are highly esteemed in business and professional circles for their skill, energy and integrity, and are well qualified to conduct the affairs of the Albany Chemical Company to a favorable issue. We would observe that the company promptly fills all orders from its long list of chemicals, etc., at the lowest ruling market prices, and its patronage is steadily increasing, owing to the superiority of its productions, which are general favorites with the trade and profession wherever introduced.
   JAMES MINGAY,                                       SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y.


JAMES MINGAY SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y. WITH GROUND STOPPER AND STANDING ALMOST 9 INCHES TALL. A RARE FIND AND A GREAT LOCAL PHARMACIST. THIS MAN HAD A LOT OF BOTTLES IN DIFFERENT VARIANTS,SOME RARE LIKE THIS ONE AND SOME ARE STILL AVAILABLE FOR FAIR PRICE. FAR FEWER OF THESE LARGE STOPPERED VARIANTS WERE PRODUCED. A VERY COLLECTABLE BOTTLE AND IN MINT SHAPE. HERE IS ANOTHER 9 INCH SARATOGA SPRINGS MEDICINE FROM JAMES MINGAY AGAIN,DATED TOO 1880'S AND EMBOSSED MINGAYS EMBROCATION. THIS IS THE ONLY ONE OF THESE KNOWN WHOLE (I HAVE THE DAMAGED ONE AS WELL) A VERY RARE BOTTLE. PLEASE CHECK OUT MT JAMES MINGAY PAGE FOR LOTS MORE INFO AND MORE OF MY COLLECTION.

 James Mingay & Co., Apothecaries, No. 472 Broadway.?The establishment so successfully conducted by Messrs. James Mingay & Co., the well-known apothecaries, at No. 472 Broadway, is the leading source of supply at Saratoga Springs for drugs and medicines. lt was established in 1869 by Mr. Jas. Mingay, and in 1884 the presentfirm was organized by the admission of Mr. Frederick Menges to partnership. lt is an elegant establishment in every way. The handsome appointments, appropriate fixtures, and the distribution of stock, present a claim for beauty and finish unsurpassed in this vicinity. A splendid line of goods is shown in every branch of the business. The pure and superior assortment of drugs, medicines and pharmaceutical preparations are supplied from the most reputable sources, -and are selected with special reference to strength and freshness. In the line of novelties in perfumery, toilet articles and fancy goods, the enterprise of the proprietors has placed within the reach of their patrons and the public the best articles that can be purchased. The house is perfectly equipped for its specialty of prescriptions, and accuracy is assured in all cases. The firm are also widely known as manufacturers of Mingay's Cough Balsam and Mingay's Magic Relief, which are highly esteemed for their efficacy and remedial qualities. The patronage of the house is large, first class and influential.business in 1885, and during his subsequent career he has built up a widely extended and liberal trade, which has been secured through his untiring efforts to please all classes of customers, and the strict principles of honor and integrity which have ever governed his transactions. He is thoroughly conversant with every detail of the business, and carries on an extensive trade in all its branches. He buys, sells and exchanges real estate, loans money on bond and mortgage, manages estates, collects rents, furnishes cottages, etc., in the most satisfactory and efficient manner.

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DR. JONES MEDICINES, SANGVIN & LINEMENT        ~         ALBANY NEW YORK
 
MY ONGOING COLLECTION OF DR JONES BOTTLES, I ALSO HAVE A PAGE ABOUT HIM...CHECK IT OUT.
  
 
Dr. Jones was elected a member of the Institute in 1874 at its session held at Niagara Falls. He was a member of the Bureau of Sanitary Science in the years 1867-68. Dr. Jones was the only son of our late colleague., Dr. E. Darwin and Sarah Jane (Phelps) Jones, and was born at Albany, N. Y., Feb. 15, 1849. After graduating from the Boys' Academy in Albany in 1866, he entered Hope College at Holland City, Mich., where he graduated, receiving the degree of Master of Art in 1873.
 
 He studied medicine with his father, and graduated from the Albany Medical College in 1873, and afterward took a Post Graduate course at the New York Homeopathic College, spent the year 1875 in Europe, the greater part of the time at the Vienna General Hospital, and returning to Albany, entered his father's office. 

 He was a member of the Albany County Homeopathic Medical Society, and its President 1885-88-89. He was also a member of the New York State Homeopathic Medical Society, and its President in 1895. He died December I, 1899.

ERASMUS DARWIN JONES, M.D.

In the first list of members of the Institute, one hundred and fifty-two in number, published in 1846, appears the name of Dr. E. D. Jones, of Albany, N. Y.

He was born in Upper Jay, Essex county, N. Y., September 10, 1818, the son of Dr. Reuben Jones, whose father also was Dr. Reuben Jones, a prominent resident of Vermont during the Revolutionary period. He received an academic education at the Keesville Academy, studied medicine with Dr. Alden March, of Albany, attended lectures at the Albany Medical College, and graduated therefrom in 1841. He began practice at Keesville, N. Y., and while there entered on a thorough investigation of the principles of Homeopathy, was convinced of its superiority over the old method, and adopted it in 1841. In 184t> he removed to Albany, where he remained until his death, August 17, l895. He held a commission as surgeon in the New York State Militia in 18 12. His father was commissioned surgeon in the war of 1812, and his grandfather had held the position of surgeon in the Vermont Militia.
He was one of the founders and an original member of the Albany County Homeopathic Medical Society, having been present at its first meeting, held in 1861. He was elected President of the County Society at its third annual meeting in 1813, and elected as Delegate to the State Society from 180l to 1804.

He was deeply interested in, and one of the founders of, the Albany Dispensary and Homeopathic Hospital. He was also one of the founders of the New York State Homeopathic Society, present at its organization in 1850, becoming at that time an active member, a permanent member in 1864 and a senior in 1876, and was elected its President in 1873.

 He was one of the pioneers of Homeopathy in Albany; for many years one of its leading and most distinguished medical men.

He married, September 8, I848 Miss Sarah Jane, daughter of Philip Phelps, who, with a son, Dr. Charles E. Jones, and a daughter, Mrs. T. E. Wadhams, survives him.


1912
Dr. M. Spiegel, of Albany, N. Y., proprietor and manufacturer of Dr. Jones's Liniment Sangvin, Beaver Skin Soap, Dr. Spiegel's Liver Pills and Worm Killer Troches, came to New York last Wednesday and made application for membership in the National Wholesale
Druggists' Association.

3.217. ?Title: "DR. JONES' SANGVIN." (For a Vegetable Remedy for Purifying the Blood and Strengthening the Nerves.) M. Spiegel, Albany, N. Y. Filed January 31, 1913.

DR. JONES FROM ALBANY N.Y. SANGVIN FOR THE BLOOD & NERVES AND LINIMENT WITH TRADEMARK BEAVER PICTURE ~  DR. JONES' SANGVIN." (For a Vegetable Remedy for Purifying the Blood and Strengthening the Nerves.) M. Spiegel, Albany, N. Y.  PAT.REGISTERED MARCH 11, 1913.
CHARLES EDMUND JONES, M.D., Albany, N. Y.
PAVILION & UNITED STATES SPRING CO.


THE PAVILION SPRING.

 

Pavilion spring is situated in the valley a few rods east of Broadway, between Lake avenue and Caroline street, and directly at the head of Spring avenue, and is reached from Broadway by taking Lake avenue or Caroline street to the second block. It is one of the best of the far-famed springs of Saratoga.

The shaft has been re-excavated ten feet deeper to the rock: the spring re-tubed, the course of the brook (which flowed through the grounds) changed, well-arranged walks laid out, and a tasteful pavilion built over the fountain. The shaft of the spring having been carried out through the hard pan to the rock below has greatly improved the water. Its minerals have been nearly doubled in strength and increased in number, and the fountain now stands second to none for medicinal and commercial purposes in this justly-celebrated mineral valley. This deep tubing will therefore secure a uniformity in the strength and quality of the water which cannot be obtained in springs which are tubed near the surface of the ground.

THE UNITED STATES SPRING.

is in the grounds of the Pavilion spring, and owned by the same company. Though less than ten feet from the Pavilion spring, its water is quite different in saline value. It is an alterative, and is much used mixed with wine.

 

BARTLETT & PLUMMER DRUGGIST AND CHEMIST ~  NEW YORK
 
 
A VIBRANT GREEN 9 INCH CYLINDER WITH THICK CRUDE TAPERED  LIP,A PRETTY HARD TO GET DRUGGIST WITH TONS OF CHARACTER AND IN A GLOWING COLOR...SWEET!
 
 
BARTLETT & PLUMMER, Druggists and Chemists, No. 1300 Broadway and No. 405 Fifth Avenue.—The exceptionally high fame which attaches to the business of Messrs. Bartlett & Plummer as druggists and chemists at No. 1300 Broadway, at the corner of Thirty-fourth Street, and at No. 405 Fifth Avenue, has arisen very largely from a recognition of the merits of "Plummer's Coca Wine preparations." of which it is the sole manufacturer; but also from the high quality and purity of every preparation which it manufactures for the trade, the scrupulous exactness with which it conforms to approved formulas has led to the achievement of a trade which has steadily expanded from the date of the inception of the enterprise in 1878, until it now has customers in nearly every part of the Union. Originally the partners were Mr. Smith Bartlett and Mr. Edward Plummer, but the former retired in 1884, and Mr. Plummer has since had the unaided proprietary control of this important business: a task he is eminently qualified to accomplish with credit to himself and unqualified satisfaction to patrons, he being a member of the College of Pharmacy of high attainments and a gentleman of very large practical experience. Each of the stores previously referred to is 25 x 75 feet in size, aud at each a large and really complete stock of goods is carried to enable the house to make shipments immediately upon receipt of orders. Mr. Plummer was born in New York, and is justly regarded as among the most prominent men in his profession in the city.
 
 
 
BARTLETT & PLUMMER'S  EMULSION PURE  COD-LIVER OIL WITH COMPOUND HYPOPHOSPHITES.

Our Emulsion is now being prescribed and recommended by physicians in all parts of the country, and preferred by them to any other preparation of Cod Liver Oil or the plain Oil. It contains 50 per cent, pure Cod-Liver Oil, combined with mucilage of Glycerine and Irish Moss, thus making a most nutritive demulcent and invaluable remedy for all pulmonary and kindred diseases. The facts must not be overlooked that it can be borne by the most sensitive stomach and readily administered to children. By the use of our very complete apparatus and process, which are entirely new, we are enabled to secure a minute division of the old globules, which assertion can be tested by the aid of the microscope. Physicians who have from any cause become dissatisfied with the use of Cod-Liver Oil, either pure or in emulsion form, will on trial find in our preparation results which are desirable not only as a medicine, but as a food where its use is indicated in wide range of diseases. Its curative properties are largely attributable to Stimulant,. Tonic and Nutritive qualities, whereby the various organic functions are recruited.  It is put up in pint bottles, with full directions, or may be ordered in any quantity and obtained from most druggists. We should be pleased to send a sample bottle for trial to any physician. In prescribing, please specify Bartlett & Plummer's Emulsion Of Cod-liver Oil With Compound Hypophosphites.

Prepared by - BARTLETT & PLUMMER,Manufacturing and Dispensing Chemists, 1282 BROADWAY, cor 33d Street, and  NEW YORK 405 FIFTH AVENUE, near 37th Street

 



Coca Wine with Quinine.

Prepared only by  BARTLETT & PLUMMER,  Druggists and Chemists,  1300 BROADWAY and 405 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK.

INVIGORATING TONIC.

This preparation has the endorsement of many prominent Physicians and highly recommended by many persons who have been benefited by its use. It is prepared from selected Coca leaves, with the addition of Tannate of Quinine (tasteless), and forms a most pleasant and invigorating tonic, giving strength to the whole system, and perfectly safe under all circumstances. It is especially adapted to convalescents and children. It improves the appetite and aids digestion and assimilation. It can be borne by the most sensitive stomach. It is Non-Alcoholic, and may be taken in place of food. If taken upon rising, it relieves the faintness and weariness of the stomach of which many persons complain and are subject to. It will often induce sleep where Opium fails. As a stomach tonic in cases of whooping cough it has been found beneficial, and strengthens the vocal cords and increases the volume of voice. We would caution against substitutes, as the success we have attained with our preparation has induced others to offer them.

BARTLETT & PLUMMER, 
GLENS FALLS WINE CO. ~ GLENS FALLS N.Y. & RARE COCA COLA- SNYDER BROS. GLENS FALLS
A LOCAL AND PRETTY HARD TO FIND STRAP SIDE  FLASK FROM THE GLENS FALLS WINE CO. IN GLENS FALLS N.Y. I WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO GET FROM MY FRIEND DANA, IN MINT CONDITION AND A PRIZE FOR MY LOCAL COLLECTION, THANKS DANA.
ON THE RIGHT IS A VERY RARE COCA COLA BOTTLING WORKS FROM GLENS FALLS WITH SNYDER BROS.. AND GLORY EMBOSSED,ALSO HAS FLUTED SHOULDER
 
 
 
BUY YOUR IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC WINES AND LIQUORS AT YOUR WH0LESALER,

Joseph S. Lowenthal, proprietor
The Glens Falls Wine Co. 31 Ridge Street.  (Branch off Pearl street, New York.)
If you wlsh to be happy, buy a bottle of our celebrated Hoffman House Whiskey. Guaranteed eight years old.
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When afflicted with stomach trouble, buy a bottle of our Blackberry Brandy, it's a sure cure. We have all the celebrated brands of
Whiskeys,wines,Gins, "Port Sherry and their five and eight years old; Claret, Rhine Wine. Angelica, Muscatel, Vermouth Angostura, Absinthe, Scotch Whiskey
key, ten years old; Cider Brandy, five years old; also. Guinness' Stout and Bass Ale.Its Good and sold by bottle, gallon or
barrel at Lowest Prices. We have Pure unfermented wines for rnedical purposes always on hand. THE GLENS FALLS WINE CO., 31 Ridge Street, Glens Falls NY

 
Potter House
Street Location: 15 Sherman Avenue, Glens Falls  Date of Original Construction: ca. 1900
Architect: Ephraim B. Potter


 Potter House, named after the architect who presumably owned and designed the structure, is one of  Ephraim Potter's later residential works.  Distinctive features of a transitional late Queen Anne - earlier
colonial style, includes the use of a cross-gambrel roof, similarly employed in Potter's design for the Thomas Burnham House, 1897 (195 Glen Street). 
Other "Potterisms"  include rock-faced limestone foundations, the distinctive porch balustrade (similar to Potter-designed Bemis Place, 5-7 Sherman Avenue; and additions to Sherman House, 380 Glen Street), 2nd floor balcony and light oak paneled hall with multiple classical motifs.   

By 1903, the house was occupied by Joseph S. Lowenthal, the proprietor of the Glens Falls Wine Co.  There is little evidence of Potter having lived in the house, he was, however, involved in speculative real estate projects.  The structure is indicative of the comfort and style, successful middle-class Glens Falls citizens expected of residential properties at the turn of the century. 
 
 
 
Glens Falls Wine Company.
One quart eight year old Whiskey, - - - 70c    One quart Holland Gin," - - - 70c    One quart French Brandy," - - - 75c
One quart Imported Port,  - - - 75c    One quart Imported Sherry, - - - 75c   One quart sweet Catawba, - - - 50c   One quart California Port, - - -35c
One quart California Sherry, - - - 35c  
* Ladies can call as we have no bar.*       Glens Falls Wine Company,  Next door to Goodson Brothers. 
DR. McWHINNIES SPAVOLENE ~ TROY N.Y.
Latest acquisition from a friend, this is  a rare local bottle . I found the information below on the man and his life.
 
 
Henry McWhinnie - Vetranarian, Troy, N. Y.

McWhinnie, Dr. Henry, was born in Chateauguay county, province of Quebec, Canada, May 16, 1865, and received his early education at Ormstown. He remained on the farm until 1880 when he became an apprentice to the blacksmith's trade in Missisquoi county, Canada. In 1884 he entered Huntington Academy and in 1886 matriculated as a student in the medical department of McGill University in Montreal, from which he was graduated in 1889. While studying, he followed his trade of blacksmith summers, earning partly enough in this was

to put himself through college. In 1889 he removed to Troy, where he has built up asuccessful practice as a veterinarian. He joined Chateauguay Lodge No. 36, Q. & R., December 25, 1888. and affiliated with Apollo Lodge, B. & A. M., of Troy in 1890. He is also a member of Bloss Council, Apollo Commandery and Oriental Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; he is a member of the New York State Veterinary Medical Society, the United States Veterinary Medical Society and the McGill University Veterinary Society, and an honorary member of the Montreal Psychological Society. May 7, 1890, he married Wilhelmina, daughter of Creighton Cassidy and sister of Rev. Creighton Cassidy of Montreal.

Emma Willard School patrons list 1913 Henry McWhinnie   -   appointed physical ed teacher at Russell Sage College 1934 -  passed away in 1955
WM. MACOMBER'S  "DR. VELPAU'S FRENCH PILLS" ALBANY, N.Y.
A HARD TO FIND ALBANY N.Y. MEDICINE, STANDING JUST UNDER 3 INCHES TALL "WM. MACOMBER MANUFACTURER ALBANY N.Y. - DR. VELPAU'S FRENCH PILLS"
 
 
 
 
 
 
1862 RedHook Journal       
 
-Ladies-Take Particular Notice.-
THE REAL Dr.VELPAU'S MALE PILLS! (WARRANTED FRENCH)

These Pills, so celebrated many years ago in Paris for the relief of female irregularities,and afterword for their employment in the practice of abortion, are now offered for sale for the first time in America. They have been kept in comparative obscurity from the fact that the originator, Dr. Velpau. is a physician in Paris, of great wealth, and strict conscientious principles, and has withheld them from general use, lest they should be employed for unlawful purposes.
In overcoming female obstructions, whites, green sickness, suppression retention or immoderate flow of the monthly discharges, nervous and spinal affections, pains in the back and limbs, fatigue on slight exertion,
palpitation of the heart, hysterics,ect. and will effect a cure when all other means have failed and
although a powerful remedy, do not contain caomel,. antimony or anything hurtful to the constitution.
To married ladies and young girls who have never been regulated, they are peculiarly suited.They will in a short time bring on the monthly period with regularity.
CAUTION:Married ladies should never take them when there is any reason to believe themselves pregnant, for they will be sure to produce a miscarriage. Ladies can procure a box, sealed from the eyes of the curious, by enclosing one dollar and six postage stamps to M. W. MACOMBER, General Agent for United States and Canada,
at Albany. N. Y. or to any authorized Agent.  (Sold by all druggists. B. F. Gedney Agent for Red Hook.)
MENGES & CURTIS,SARATOGA SPRINGS  ~   H & H WERNER, CLIFTON PARK N.Y. ~ WM. G.BALL, BALLSTON SPA

 THE OLD STORE MENGES & CURTIS SARATOGA NEW YORK. H & H WERNER,CLIFTON PARK N.Y. (RARE), VERY SCARCE WILLIAM G. BALL 1880S DRUGGIST,BALLSTON SPA NEW YORK. ALL DATES TO 1880S RANGE.MENGES & CURTIS ARE STILL IN THE SAME LOCATION IN SARATOGA,A LOCAL ICON THATS BEEN THERE SINCE THE 1800'S.

147-year success story of Menges & Curtis Pharmacy 

 
Charles R. Brown a paraplegic, moved to Saratoga Springs in 1856 after a grueling accident so he could benefit from the Victorian village's healing waters.

Brown somehow raised funds to open hotel after hotel on Broadway, each one built of wood and each one eventually burning to the ground. Park Place Block, one of Brown's original Broadway properties, consisted in the 1860s of a boarding house with an arcade and a pharmacy, called Walcott & Mingay. Pharmacist Jim Mingay employed a 12-year-old apprentice named Fred Menges, the future namesake and owner of the pharmacy. After Mingay locked up the pharmacy to leave the Village to serve in the Civil War, he returned and reopened the drug store just to see it, within the Park Place Hotel, burn down. A persistent Charlie Brown and

Mingay moved north on Broadway, purchasing the Ainsworth Building in 1876. Like City Hall and the village's first railroad station, the four-story structure was built in 1871. In the building, Brown put the Crystal Spring hotel and the James Mingay Pharmacy. The Ainsworth building still stands today. In 1880, Brown passed the deed to the building to his only child, a daughter named Florence Skidmore Brown, who caught the eye of Fred Menges, the original Broadway druggist's apprentice. After marrying Florence Skidmore Brown in 1884, Menges and his brother, Albert, ran the Fred Menges Apothecary for several years. In 1922, Albert Menges took over the business and formed a partnership with Ray Curtis. The pair opened the pharmacy finally giving it its enduring name

© M&C APOTHECARY

Menges & Curtis Apothecary name vanishing after 150 years Read more: The Business Review (Albany)

BALL. WILLIAM G.?Druggist, Ballston Spa. Born in Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 23, 1839. Educated in public schools. (Married.) Captain U. S. V. 1861-5. Town Clerk of Milton, Saratoga County, N. Y., 1869-70. Member Board of Education, Ballston Spa, 1890-5. Now vice-president and director, Ballston Spa National Bank. Member Franklin Lodge No. 90, F. & A. M., and William H. McKittrick Post No. 40, G. A. R.

Wm. G. Ball, son of George and Mary Ball, b. Philadelphia, s. 1851, Druggist.

William G. Ball, one of the leading business men of Ballston, N. Y., died at the age of 69 years. He was in the drug business for forty years and was VicePresident of the Ballston Spa National bank.
 WILLIAM H. QUINN DRUGGIST, BALLSTON SPA W.H. QUINN & BROTHER, BALLSTON SPA

 

A VERY SCARCE WILLIAM H. QUINN DRUGGIST, BALLSTON SPA AND A VERY SCARCE VARIANT OF W.H. QUINN & BROTHER, BALLSTON SPA NEW YORK.

William H. Quinn, Ballston Spa, N. Y., purchased on April 12 1893, the entire drug business late of W. J. Redmond & Co., of that place, of which he was junior partner, and will thereafter be sole proprietor.William H. Quinn will incorporate as the William H. Quinn Drug Co. About May 1 1908, Mr. Quinn will open a new drug store in Schenectady.

Wm. H. Quinn, of De Camp & Quinn, Glens Falls, has purchased his partner's Interest in the drug business there, and will conduct the business hereafter under the firm name of S. T. Quinn & Co. The new member of the firm, S. T. Quinn, a brother of Wm. H., will divide his time between the local store and that of W. H. Quinn & Brother, of Ballston. _ William P. De Camp, the former member of the firm, has entered the employ of Merck & Co., New York, as traveling salesman.

B. SCHERMERHORN ~  SMITHS EYE WATER ~ T. H. SANDS  PENNINGTON 

A RARE B. SCHERMERHORN PHARMICIST SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y. ALSO RARE IS THIS T.H.SANDS PENNINGTON PHARMICIST SARATOGA WHO WAS IN BUSINESS WITH F.T. HILL ON 162 BROADWAY IN LATE 1880'S. THE LAST BEING AN ALBANY N.Y. MEDICINE FROM DR. JONES.ALL DATE TOO 1880-90S RANGE

T. H. Sands Pennington, Pharmacist, No. 400 Broadway.? ln elegance, reliability and extent of trade the pharmacy of Mr. T. H. Sands Pennington at No. 400 Broadway, occupies a leading position at Saratoga Springs. The career of the house since the accession of Mr. Pennington to the proprietorship in 1880 has been prosperous and successful, and under enterprising and efficient management the volume of transactions has steadily increased with each succeeding year. The store is spacious in size, and all its appointments are handsome, attractive and appropriate, no pains or expense being spared to make it as complete as possible in every feature. A very large stock is.carried of pure drugs, chemicals and pharmaceutical preparations, essences and extracts, wines and liquors for medicinal purposes, toilet articles and fancy goods, druggists' sundries of all kinds, and, in fact, everything kept in a first class establishment devoted to this trade. The proprietor makes his purchases from the most reputable sources, approaching first hands only, which is duly appreciated by all who patronize this house. The prescription department is carefully and systematically directed, and the limit of precision and safety is reached in every case. Mr. Pennington is well and favorably known in this community as an experienced and accomplished pharmacist. He is a member of the American Pharmaceutical Association, and we cordially commend his establishment to visitors in Saratoga as worthy of every confidence

THE STAR SPRING CO. ~  SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y.
THE STAR SPRING

Located on Spring avenue near the termination of Circular street. Star Spring Co., proprietors, Melvin Wright, Superintendent.
History.

Under the name of President Spring, and afterwards Iodine Spring, the fountain now called the Star has been known for nearly a century; long enough to test its merits and long enough to sink it in oblivion if it possessed no merits. Its lustre is undimmed, and it promises to be a star that shall never set. During these many years a goodly proportion of tottering humanity have found in this spring an amendment to their several crippled constitutions. It was first tubed in 1835. In 1865 the Star Spring Co. was formed, and in the following year the spring was retubed under their direction. In 1870 they erected the finest bottling-house in Saratoga. Great care is taken to preserve the spring in a pure condition and perfect repair. The water has become immensely popular in New England, where it is "the spring," and throughout the United States and Canada.
For Commercial Use.

The water is sold in cases of quarts and pints, and besides, owing to the large amount of gas which is finely incorporated with the water, the company are enabled to supply families with it in kegs of fifteen gallons, in which the water keeps as well as in bottles, and at one-fourth to one-sixth the cost. This method seems to give entire satisfaction and is fast coming into general use. This is the only spring that supplies the water in bulk to families. The price to druggists in bulk is twenty cents per gallon, to families $4 per half barrel, to the trade in cases at $21 per gross for pints, and $30 per gross for quarts.
Properties.
The Star water is mildly cathartic, has a pleasant, slightly acid taste, gentle and healthy in its action, and yet powerful in its effects.
It is far more desirable for general use as a cathartic than the preparations of the apothecary.  Rev. Dr. Cuyler, in one of his peculiarly charming letters, gives the Star Water preference over all others as an active and efficient cathartic.
 LANSING & SWEENEY DRUGGIST  & REXALL STORE  , BALLSTON SPA, NY

                                                   

2 VERY HARD TO GET LANSING & SWEENEY DRUGGISTS FROM BALLSTON SPA, N.Y. DATED TOO 1870-80S RANGE THIS DRUGGIST STARTED OUT AS REDMOND THEN QUINN AND THEN LANSING & SWEENEY AS NOTED BELOW.. 

 

 Lansing & Sweeney, Ballston Spa., N. Y. Formerly Wm. H. Quinn Drug Co.~That William H. Quinn, Ballston Spa, N. Y., purchased on April 12 the entire drug business late of W. J. Redmond & Co., of that place, of which he was junior partner, and will thereafter be sole proprietor

WASHINGTON SPRING COMPANY, BALLSTON SPA N.Y. ~ J. LAKE & CO., SARATOGA N.Y.



HAD 1 AND SOLD IT TO ANOTHER
COLLECTOR AND THEN LUCKED INTO THIS ONE ON A TRADE FOR A GUN...THIS ONE IS STAYING.ON THE RIGHT A PRETTY SCARCE JOHN LAKE & COMPANY,SARATOGA SPRINGS

THE WASHINGTON SPRING CO. BALLSTON SPA N.Y.is situated near the railroad embankment in the centre of the village, north and south. This was drilled to a depth of six hundred and twelve feet in the summer of 1868.
The proprietors, Simon B. Conde and John Brown, have recently erected a fine building over the spring, and have a tract of seven acres of land, including a portion of the flat, and extending up the wooded slope to the fair-grounds. Mr. Conde, who has sunk most of these wells in Ballston Spa, has given considerable study to this work, and is understood to have been the author of the article in "Appleton's Encyclopedia" upon artesian wells. His skill and judgment have established for him a wide reputation as a successful operator. The following is the analysis of the water of this spring, and it ought to be added that it was made from a specimen


taken before the work was fairly finished, and before it was protected from the intrusion of fresh water, as it is now. A new analysis would show still greater strength and purity:
 
 
JOHN LAKE & CO. SARATOGA N.Y.
(Courtesy of Roy Topka,from his book "Old Schenectady Bottles")
John Lake produced what are probably the most prized Schenectady bottles out there, the J.Lake cobalt soda. It is the oldest known bottle in glass or pottery with Schenectady embossed on it, he had bottles produced as early as 1840s and these were likely pottery. John was in business through at least mid 1859, when he sold out to James Rodgers. He then had bottles produced for himself J.Lake & Co. Saratoga N.Y. although listed in the Schenectady directory took place in Saratoga.
SARATOGA SPRINGS MINERAL WATER BOTTLES

 

4 OF MY SARATOGA BOTTLES AND THE HISTORY OF THEM..
 
Congress Spring was discovered in 1792 by Nicholas Gilman, a member of Congress. It was tubed by Gideon Putnam, an early developer of Saratoga Springs. Dr. John Clark purchased the spring in 1826, bottled the water, and shipped it throughout the world.
 
 
JOHN CLARKE: SARATOGA MINERAL WATER

John Clarke was a soda fountain owner in New York City. He saw the potential of the area's pure water and purchased land with partner Thomas Lynch in 1823. In 1825 both men started bottling water. Saratoga Springs was the home to 122 natural springs and renowned for the therapeutic mineral water. The Iroquois Indians called the High Rock Spring the " Medicine Springs of the Great Spirit". The first bottles produced were from the Mt. Vernon Glass Works. The bottles were embossed LYNCH & CLARKE until 1833. This was the year Thomas Lynch would die. Then the Bottles were embossed John Clarke.
John Clarke would marry Widow Eliza White who purchased the High Rock Springs. Together they form the Company Clarke & White and bottled their Saratoga mineral water. Clarke successfully marketed his bottled water across America and Europe. The Clarke & White mineral water bottles are one of the most common do to their success.(Disagree with this) John Clarke would die in 1856. A few years after his death a William B. White bought the property from his heirs and remained sole owner until his death. Mrs. Sheehan Bouty how was William's sister bought the property from William's heirs. Now she would become the sole owner. She would sell one half of her interest of the company to Chauncey Kilmer and a corporation was formed now called The Congress And Empire Spring Company.
Bottles embossed with the C come from the Congress Springs and bottles embossed with an E come from the Empire Springs.
At some point the Hotchkiss family became the principal shareholder and by 1884 the company would split forming two companies. One was called the Congress spring Company and the other called Empire Spring Company.
 References:
  Saratoga's by Bernard C. Puckhaber 1976.  Sylvester's History of Saratoga County 1866 and 1878.
Frank & Frank Jr. Bottle Collection. 


CONGRESS & EMPIRE SPRING CO.
Preparing the Waters for Export. Not one-fifth part of the mineral waters that flow so freely at Saratoga Springs is consumed at the wells and fountains. A large proportion of the waters used for medical purposes are consumed by invalids and others in distant places, and who are unable to visit the natural springs. The fame of the waters is spread around the world, and, as the people who need them cannot go to Saratoga, Saratoga must go to them by rail or sea, and in good glass bottles or tin-lined casks. Tens of thousands do visit the springs, but their stay is short, and in many cases they find it important to continue the use of the waters, even after they have reached home. They, too, add to the demand for the bottled waters, and in every country and climate they may now obtain the water of nearly every spring, in its native purity and strength, and may rest confident that they are drinking the real waters, unalloyed by artificial mixtures of any kind. To supply this demand, a large and important branch of business has sprung up, involving a liberal supply of capital, and giving employment to a large number of men, and placing the waters on every druggist's counter in the land.

The bottling and packing is carried out throughout the year, and, except during the height of the visiting season, when so much is consumed at the springs as materially to decrease the supply for bottling, the work is prosecuted night and day. The arrangements for this purpose are the most complete of anything of the kind in the country, and all the various operations are carried on with a care, skill, and perfection unsurpassed.

In order to increase the facilities for obtaining bottles, the Congress and Empire Spring Company erected a good glass-house some time since, and now, not only this company, but many of the others are easily supplied with such bottles as they need. Some of the bottles are of dark glass, and others, like those used by the Geyser Company, are of white or crystal glass.

Each bottle, before being filled, is thoroughly washed and rinsed with both warm and cold water, a stream of each of which is constantly pouring into the tanks before the washers. To detach any impurities that cannot be removed by other means, a small brass chain is dropped into each bottle and thoroughly shaken about. The substitution of this simple and effective method of cleansing for the use of shot or pebbles is an improvement which might well be adopted by every housewife.

The corks used are all branded with the initials or trademarks of the companies, and none but the very first quality of cork wood is used. The name of company can be easily seen through the glass, and none but the willfully stupid need be deceived in buying a single pint or quart.

For instance, the corks of the Congress and Empire Co.'s bottles are marked thus: Congress Water, Empire Water,  C. & E. S. Co. C. & E. S. Co.  Columbian Water,  C. & E. S. Co.

The brands used for this purpose are set into a small table, their lettered faces being nearly level with its surface. They are kept hot by a jet of gas turned on them from below, and the corks receive their brand by being rolled over the heated types? an expert boy performing the simple operation with great rapidity.

The wire used for securing the corks is manufactured expressly for the purpose from the finest quality of copper, some two thousand pounds being required annually by one company.

The bottles are securely packed in wooden boxes, and every box is fully marked to prevent all mistake. Each box contains a convenient quantity for family use, which is usually two dozen quart or four dozen pint-bottles.

The waters are either pumped through block-tin pipes from the springs, or the water is forced into the bottles by its own hydrostatic pressure. When pumps are employed a large receiver is used to hold the water under pressure and free from contact with the air, and in drawing it the utmost care is taken to prevent the escape of the gas held in the water. In the case of the pipe wells the water is drawn like so much soda-water into the bottles from pipes that tap the main wells many feet below their outlets.

The corks, after being soaked in warm water until they become so soft as to be easily compressed, are driven into the bottles by machinery, the process reducing their size before entering the bottles about one-third. It requires a strong bottle to stand the pressure of their expansion after being driven in, and even strong men sometimes find it difficult to pull them out. A single workman will fill and cork from fifteen to twenty dozen bottles per hour.

After being filled and corked, the bottles are laid upon their sides in large bins, holding from one hundred and fifty to two hundred dozen each, where they are allowed to remain four or five days, or longer, to test the strength of the bottles by the expansion of the gas, and also to detect any corks that may be leaky or otherwise imperfect. The breakage, while in this situation, is about five per cent, of the whole number filled, and sometimes more. The^bottles frequently burst with a sharp report, like the firing of a pistol or the cracking of champagne bottles. Every bottle that breaks, either while in the testing bins, or in any of the various processes of washing, filling, or packing, is registered in the office of the company, by means of wires going from different parts of the establishment, and centering there in an apparatus arranged for the purpose. All leaky corks are drawn, and the bottles refilled with water direct from the spring. While all these precautions add largely to the expense of putting up the waters, they render a leaky, and consequently a bad bottle almost impossible, and they also render breakage in subsequent handling a matter of rare occurrence.

When the bottles and corks have been thus thoroughly tested, the corks are securely wired, this operation being performed with great rapidity by employees long trained to the work.

The next process is the packing in cases, which is also done with great care and remarkable dexterity. The neck of each bottle is firmly wound with clean, new straw, and the bottles are placed on their sides in tiers of equal number, a parting strip of straw being laid between each bottle and its neighbor on either side. A layer of straw is also placed between the tiers of bottles as well as at the top and bottom of the box. When the box is filled, the packer walks over the bottles, for the double purpose of settling them properly in their places, and as a further test of their strength, before the lid is put in its place and nailed down. If a bottle gives way under the weight of the packer, of course the whole box is emptied, and not again repacked until it is thoroughly dry, as must be all the straw which is used for packing.

As immense quantities of these waters are put up during the winter months, when the demand is comparatively small, and when the weather is usually too cold for their safe transportation, large storage capacity is required to secure and protect the stock on hand. Some idea of the room required for this purpose may be formed from the fact that the buildings used exclusively for storing water in boxes, at the Congress Spring alone, have an area of over twelve thousand square feet on the ground floor, with capacity for safely keeping at a proper temperature through the winter months more than twenty thousand boxes of the water.

The proprietors of the springs are always pleased to show the wonders of their bottling plants to visitors, and an instructive hour m&y well be spent in them.

The rows of men and boys, bare-armed before the steaming washing tubs: the salt-incrusted receivers, and the bottle-filler with dextrous fingers loading up the pints and quarts; the corker, with his queer machinery ; the huge bins of full or empty bottles piled in countless thousands, one over the other, the curious industry of the wire-boys and the packers ; and the vast caverns of the storage cellars, all unite to make a scene of singular interest, and the intelligent visitor should make it a point to see, at least, one of these immense establishments.

The exports of spring water in casks is somewhat different. The casks are of the best of oak, and are securely lined with pure block-tin. This metal must not be confounded with our common tinware. That is only sheet iron having a thin skin of tin. This tin coating soon wears away, and then the iron rusts, as the good housekeeper knows to her sorrow. Block-tin, such as is used as a lining for these casks, is a soft, white metal, that contains no iron and cannot rust. It is made air-tight and will hold the water alone without the cask. The cask is only to keep the tin cask inside in shape, as the metal is so soft that a barrel of water could hardly stand alone, much less be rolled about in a freight-car.

There are two openings in these casks at the top, and to each is secured a block-tin pipe. One pipe extends nearly to the bottom of the cask, and the other is only an inch or two long. In filling the cask the water-pipe from the spring is screwed to the top of the larger pipe, and the water, under the pressure of its gas, flows in and driving the air out of a small air-hole fills the cask. When it is full the air-hole is stopped up, but the pressure is continued for a moment or two longer, so that that cask is not only filed solid, but is packed, so to speak, and the water is under the same pressure in the cask as in its native spring. In those casks the waters of the Excelsior, Geyser, and other springs is readily transported to al] parts of the country. In drawing the water, a block-tin pipe, with a suitable cooler, is attached to the longer pipe, and a small air pump to the shorter pipe. On pumping air into the cask the water flows out through an ordinary soda-fountain faucet in its native parity. When the casks are empty they are returned for refilling, and it often happens that a single dealer will have two or more casks constantly on the road, going and coming each way, perhaps two thousand miles or more by rail or boat. *

The Danger of Artificial Waters.

The value and importance of Saratoga's waters, and the ever growing demand for them has stimulated the manufacture of artificial waters. Owners of soda apparatus, and druggists with small knowledge and smaller conscience, have concocted a number of queer mixtures that they call mineral waters. Some of these strange drinks are about as useful and harmless as good Croton water and vastly dearer, for one can have that for the asking. Some are put up in bottles and siphons, and called after famous Saratoga springs, and are even packed in abandoned Congress-water boxes. Their only connection with Saratoga is in name, and the name is a fraud and a pretense. Even the trademarks of the springs have been imitated, and in the case of the Congress Spring, an important law suit was instituted with the verdict in favor of the spring. The Congress Company thus speak of the matter:

"The use of the terms ' Congress Water,' 'Columbian Water,' or 'Empire Water,' alone or in combination with other words, when applied to any other than the liquids naturally flowing from these springs, is an evident violation of the rights of the proprietors, and a fraud upon the public. In a recent case, determined in the United States Court, the manufacturer and vender of an artificial compound, sold as Congress water, were enjoined from putting up or selling * any water not of the natural flow of the said spring, in bottles or packages marked with the words " Congress Water," or with words of like import.' It would be well for the public if this matter were more fully understood, as the articles thus offered are entirely worthless, and often dangerous; their use frequently producing griping pains, vertigo, etc., and sometimes resulting in serious permanent difficulties?effects wholly different from those produced by the genuine waters. They weaken the digestive powers, and destroy the tone of the stomach and bowels, often rendering a mild case of dyspepsia incurable Old boxes and bottles., bearing the genuine brands, are of
ten bought up by counterfeiters for the purpose of filling them with their valueless articles?for which reason purchasers should always examine the corks, which cannot be used a second time, and which; if the waters are genuine, will have the brand of the bottling company.

"The injury inflicted by the sale of these artificial compounds upon the proprietors and the public is double; for, on taking these spurious articles and finding either no effect, or injurious effects, from their use, purchasers in future refuse the genuine waters, supposing they have already tried them; or, knowing that the waters used are artificial, decline the natural waters on the supposition that they have tried what is in substance the same, without benefit?as if there existed the slightest comparison between them!

"That it is impossible to form these waters artificially the testimony of scientific men is uniform and abundant. 'It is impossible,' says the celebrated English chemist, Sir Humphrey Davy, 'to recombine the ingredients so as to make an article of equal quality, the effects of which will be the same as the natural water.' The language of the late Dr. James Johnson, of London, is as follows : 'Mineral waters contain many agents which we cannot imitate by artificial combinations. This is proved by every day's observations. Thus, the saline, aperient mineral waters will produce ten times more effect than the identical materials artificially dissolved and mixed. The same is true with respect to the chalybeate springs. A grain of iron in them is more tonic than twenty grains exhibited according to the pharmacopceia.'

"An acorn maybe analyzed, but it is as impossible for the chemist to form an acorn from its chemical elements as it is for him to create the oak which in the course of nature the acorn is destined to produce. To give the name, therefore, of Congress water to a mere solution of common salt; soda, magnesia, lime, and iron, or other minerals, is as absurd as to give the name of wine to a mixture of cream of tartar, alcohol, and mineral salts, which this liquid proves to be when analyzed.

"In so important a matter it is deemed well to add the testimony of Dr. Constantino James, to be found
in his 'Practical Guide to the Mineral Watering-places of Europe.' 'Artificial mineral waters of the best fabrication are, in a medical and chemical point of view, only a poor counterfeit of the real waters whose names they usurp. They are doubly pernicious, as they do not attain the physician's aims, and cast a certain discredit on the genuine production.'

'* The testimony of Dr. A. A. Hayes, and S. Dana Hayes, Esq., State Assayers for Massachusetts, is to the same effect. . 'Although we know just what the genuine water contains, an artificial water made by the analysis would not be the same thing medicinally. Mineral waters are the productions of natural chemical agencies, aided by time, and we really know but little of the resulting combinations and their physiological effects.'

"However skillfully combined, therefore, the manufactured imitations may be, they are destitute of the characteristic properties which nature so mysteriously and abundantly supplies in these springs. The editor of the Sew York Gazette gives his readers a timely caution, as follows . . 'If you don't want to grow old prematurely; if you would keep the teeth in your mouth, the luster in your eyes; if you would not have a used-up digestive apparatus; if you would give a wide berth to Bright's disease, which is making so many bite the dust; then, first and most of all, don't drink the manufactured mineral waters that are offered from numberless fountains. They are sadly injurious, and very many
people are drinking them to excess.' 'Go to the natural springs,' says Dr. Bourdon, a celebrated French physician. 'Nature is far better than the laboratory. I cannot condemn in too strong terms the use of artificial mineral waters. They never replace those of the natural springs.'"
 
 
 
CONGRESS & EMPIRE SPRINGS

The Congress Spring. This spring is located in Congress Park, opposite the southern end of Congress Hall. There is an artistic and very beautifu1 pavilion built over it to protect tne visitors from sun and rain, and, as it stands next to the sidewalk and near Broadway, it is easily found. The boxed and bottled waters are familiar to druggists in every State, and over all Europe. it is most generally known and used of any of the Saratoga springs, and has probably effected more cures of the diseases for which its waters are a specific, than any other mineral spring in America. It was discovered by a party of hunters in 1792, and was forthwith named Congress Springs, in honor of John Taylor Gilman, member of Congress from Exeter, New Hampshire, who wag one of the party.As soon as the properties of the water became generally known, the small supply obtainable from the natural overflow led the inhabitants to attempt making a reservoir. This, to their dismay, resulted in a total stoppage of the spring, which continued for some time. One of the first settlers, Gideon Putnam by name, while prospecting in the vicinity, observed bubbles rising from the bed of the brook, near whose margin the Congress Spring had formerly flowed. He dug a new channel for the stream, and, to his delight, found the lost waters bubbling up in their original purity. The spring was soon afterward rudely tubed with plank, and in 1823 it was first bottled for exportation by Dr. John Clarke, of New York, who purchased the spring and adjacent lands from the Livingston family, who held it under an ancient grant. In 1842 the spring was retubed. An ex ? cavation was made which revealed the rock whence the water issued. The tubing was placed in the most careful manner, and by means of packing with clay a large supply of water was ob tained. The property continued in the hands of Dr. Clarke's heirs or their executors until 1865, when it was purchased by a company incorporated under the name of the " Congress and Empire Spring Company." This company owns the beautiful semicircular valley in which the Congress and Columbian Springs are found. The sides of this valley are still covered with forest  trees, amid whose towering trunks are shaded walks, which af« ford a gay and fashionable promenade for the thousands of visitors who throng the great hotels near by. In connection with a recent analysis of Congress Spring, Prof. C. F. Chandler remarks, that " the superior excellence of this water is due to the fact that it contains, in the most desirable proportions, those substances which produce its agreeable flavor and satisfactory medicinal effects?neither-holding them in excess nor lacking any constituent to be desired in this class of waters. As a cathartic water, its almost entire freedom from iron should r.ecornmend it above all others, many of which contain so much of this ingredient as to seriously impair their usefulness." Prof. Chandler also remarks, that a comparison of his analysis with the analysis made by Dr. John H. Steel, in 1832, proves that the Congress water still retains its original strength, and all the virtues which established its well-merited reputation.

The Empire Spring.  This spring is one of the first-class, and is located in the shallow valley that runs through the village, and in the neighbor hood of other noted springs. To reach it from Congress Hall, follow Broadway to the north to Lake Avenue, the fourth turn on the right. Follow this street down hill to the second turn on the left. This is Spring Street, and the large bottling house of the spring will be seen directly opposite the end of the street The spring is in a pavilion before the building. For full and reliable information concerning this spring, call at the office of the Congress and Empire Spring Company, near Congress Hall. Although the existence of mineral water in this locality has been known for a long time, it was not until 1846 that any one thought it worth the necessary expense of excavation and tub ing. At that time the Messrs. Robinson owned the property, and determined to tube the spring. The rock was struck twelve feet below the surface of the earth, and so copious was the flow of water that the tubing proved to be a work of unusual difficulty. It was, however, successfully accomplished, and the water flowed in great abundance and purity. It soon attracted the attention of medical men, and was found to possess curative properties which rendered it available in diseases which had not before been affected by Saratoga waters. It has proved itself adapted to a wide range of cases, especially of a chronic nature, and its peculiar value has become a well-recognized fact among medical men. Its general properties closely resemble the Congress, and it was for a time known as the New Congress Spring. The spring is now owned by the Congress and Empire Spring Company, which was formed by the consolidation of two other companies in 1865

 
BALLSTON SPA ARTESIAN SPRING CO.

A TRADE FROM A COLLECTOR IN VERMONT, BALLSTON SPA ARTESIAN SPRING IN GREAT CONDITION IN PINT SIZE.
 
 
 
BALLSTON SPA MINERAL WATER / ARTESIAN SPRING CO.
 
 
Ballston Spa derives its celebrity from the mineral springs, which flow here in great abundance. The artesian springs flow, from a depth of six hundred feet, through solid rock
A New-York correspondent of a Western journal writes that the new Artesian Lithia Spring, recently discovered at Ballston Spa, in this State, has given new life to that village, and adds that during last Summer a large portion of the visitors to the springs at Saratoga 

 

A scientific writer stated “the original spring issues from a bed of stiff blue clay and gravel, which lies near a stratum of slate nearly on a level with the brook or rivulet which runs through the town.” When the Artesian Litha Spring was discovered as a ditch was being dug near Saratoga Avenue, it first gushed oil, supposedly superior to that of the Pennsylvania oil region. However, some time later the spring began spouting water every third day until it was tubed.

HENRY J. BARNETT ALBANY
 
 
 HENRY J. BARNETT ARCH & SOUTH PEARL STREET ALBANY N.Y.  1/2 PINT GUARANTEED WHISKEY FLASK
J.E. MOORE & COMPANY ~ ALBANY N.Y. & DEMARSH'S FAMILY DRUG STORE, COHOES



















J.E. MOORE & CO. 415 BROADWAY ALBANY NEW YORK WITH GROUND STOPPER. PRETTY SCARCE BOTTLE DATING TO LATE 1880S RANGE. N RIGHT A FAVORITE FOR OBVIOUS REASONS THAT I DUG...DEMARSHS FAMILY DRUG STORE (MY LAST NAME)

The doubling capacity of a pharmaceutical manufacturing plant within three years is pretty good evidence that the products of such a concern are well appreciated by the drug trade. Such is the record of J. E. Moore & Co., 413 Broadway, Albany, N. Y., and they invite every druggist in the United States to send for their 1894 catalogue and become acquainted with the very complete line of pharmaceuticals which they manufacture. They ?will also be pleased to furnish quotations upon special preparations and private formula work, their complete facilities enabling them to turn out such work in the most satisfactory manner.

PEMPHIGUS.
In the treatment many remedies were tried. No good effect was realized from the use of Fowler's solution. The most benefit appeared to be derived from the use of pills manufactured by J. E. Moore, of Albany, from the following formula, viz:
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J. E. Moore, Albany, the well-known Pill manufacturer, exhibits a fine line of Sugar and Gelatine-coated Pills, Isinglass Court Plasters in standard and fancy.styles. He is represented by Mr. C. L. Cotton.

NATIONAL MILLS ~ WALTER McEWAN, ALBANY N.Y.

A COUPLE RECENT FINDS, BLOWN IN MOLD AND DATING TO LAST QUARTER OF 1800S. COFFEE & TEA/SPICE PRODUCER & IMPORTER HERE IN ALBANY NY. 

NO DAMAGE TO EITHER, GLASS FOLD IN INSIDE OF LIP AS SEEN IN PICTURE ON CYLINDER,OTHER IS PERFECT.

 

 1879 ADVERTISEMENT, SATURDAY EVENING POST

 

 

The National Mills of Walter McEwan, corner of Maiden lane and James street, were established in 1865, and came into the possession of the present proprietor in 1872. The premises are comprised in a four-story brick building, 25 by 65 feet in dimensions. The products of this house consist of every variety of ground coffee and spices. A special feature of the mills is the manufacture of flavoring extracts and a large dealer in coffee and spices, manufactures the National Baking Powder, a pure, wholesome, and unquestionably reliable article.
"Royal Dutch Coffee. National Coffee and Spice Mills. Walter McEwan Co., Albany, N. Y., U. S. A." "Prepared by the Beach Process (patented) which removes by steam, before roasting, the Tannic Acid, a powerful astringent, injurious to many, producing headaches, biliousness, etc. Royal Dutch Coffee prepared by the Beach process can be drunk by the most delicate without discomfort or injury."

 

1913

The reorganization of the firm of Oppenheim Bros, wholesale grocers, 42-46 Hudson Ave. and 1 Dallis St., Albany, N. Y., took place January 2, Benjamin F. Oppenheim retiring and his place being taken by Walter S. McEwan. The firm of Oppenheim Bros. was organized 23 years ago by Gustave L. and Benjamin F. Oppenheim, and has come to be recognized as one of the foremost houses of its kind in that section of the State. The reorganization carries with it a change of name from Oppenhelm Bros. to Oppenheim & McEwan Co. The concern has been incorporated to do business in teas, coffees, spices, etc. Capital stock, $100,000; -incorporators, Gustave L. Oppenheim, Saidee L. Oppenheim, Walter S. McEwan and Mrs. Mary B. McEwan. There is absolutely no connection between this new corporation and Walter l\lcEwan Co., wholesale grocers and roasters of coffee, of Albany, whose oflicers are, Geo. Wm. McEwan, president; A. S. McEwan, vice-presidcnt, and Chas. B. McEwan, secretary and treasurer.

GEYSER SPOUTING SPRING  ~ STATE  OF NEW YORK, SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y.

GEYSER OR "SPOUTING SPRING."

This spring is a most wonderful fountain of mineral water. It was discovered in 1870, and is situated about one mile and a quarter southwest of the village of Saratoga Springs, in the midst of the beautiful region now known as "Geyser Lake and Park." The spring-house is a building which was formerly occupied for manufacturing purposes; but has, since the spring was discovered, been fitted up for the reception of visitors. As you enter the building, directly in front is this marvelous spouting spring, sending forth a powerful stream of water to the very top of the room, which, in descending to its surrounding basin, sprays into a thousand crystal streams, forming a beautiful, overflowing fountain charming to behold.

In the centre of the room is the artistical basin into which the spray descends. It is about six feet square, and from the bottom rises an iron pipe. From this pipe leaps, in fantastic dance, the creamy water of the spring. To allow it full play there is an opening in the ceiling, and here it rises and falls, day and night, continually. A large business is here carried on in bottling this valuable water.

The spring rises from an orifice bored in the rock, five and a half inches in diameter, and one hundred and thirty-two feet deep. The rock formation consists of a strata of slate eighty feet thick, beneath which lies the strata of bird's-eye limestone in which the mineral vein was struck. The orifice is tubed with a block-tin pipe, encased with iron, to the depth of eighty-five feet, the object being to bring the water through the soft slate formation, as the immense pressure and force of the gas would dissolve the slate, thereby causing impurities in the water.

GEYSER SPOUTING SPRING, SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y.

 
 
 
 
A COUPLE PICTURES OF MY GEYSER SPOUTING SPRING..WHERE ELSE BUT WITH THE GEYSER SPOUTING SPRING IN THE BACKGROUND, THE COPPER COLOR SEEN IN LIP IS FROM THE MINERAL COLOR REFLECTING UP AND NO MATTER WHAT I DID IT STAYED.
HATHORN SPRING, SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y.

HERE IS A NICE PINT SIZE HATHORN SPRING FROM SARATOGA SPRINGS AND LOCATED, STILL ACCESSIBLE IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN SARATOGA. ON RIGHT IS A LABELED STILL FULL & CORKED WITH RETAINING WIRE LATER BOTTLE I PICKED UP. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
THE HATHORN SPRING.

This spring is on Spring street, directly opposite the north wing of Congress Hall. It was discovered in 1869 by some workmen employed in placing the foundation of the brick block which contains the ball-room of Congress Hall. It is named in honor of the Hon. Henry H. Hathorn, who first developed the spring and rebuilt the famous Congress Hall Hotel. The spring was very securely tubed in 1872, at the large expense of $15,000. The Hathorn spring has since become one of the most valuable springs in Saratoga. Large quantities of water are bottled and sold in the leading towns and cities of the United States and Canada.

The water contains 888.403 grains of solid contents in a gallon, and combines chloride of sodium, the prevailing chemical element of all the Saratoga spring-waters, with bicarbonate of lithia and other valuable properties.
 
 
 

Hathorn Spring No. 1 is located on the Northeast corner of Putnam and Springs Streets, right in the heart of Saratoga Springs.

"Discovered in 1866, by a workman, Samuel Freeburn, while digging an excavation for Congress Hall, and named after Henry H, Hathorn owner of the Congress Hotel .A highly-carbonated water of an Alkaline-Saline flavor noted for its high mineral content, and renowned as a digestive curative...

SARATOGA RED SPRING ~  SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y.

 J.F.LAMBERTON, SARATOGA ~  THAYER & LAMBERTON , SARATOGA SPRINGS

 

 

  #1 ~A VERY RARE J.F. LAMBERTON   SARATOGA SPRINGS NEW YORK, 6+ INCHES TALL AND DATED TOO 1880S RANGE A VERY CLEAN BOTTLE, AS YOU CAN SEE BY THE 2 ADS BELOW THE BUSINESS DROPPED THAYER AND MOVED TOO 416 BROADWAY FROM 180 BROADWAY ALL IN A SHORT TIME AS HE WAS ONLY IN BUSINESS ABOUT 5-7 YRS. BEST I CAN TELL SEARCHING SARATOGA LIBRARY ARCHIVES.

 

#2 ~A RARE BOTTLE, THAYER & LAMBERTON WITH MONOGRAM. BEEN SEARCHING FOR THI ONE FOR A WHILE

 

 

Lamberton & Co Saratoga PharmacyAt No. 410 Broadway, in Ainsworth's Block, opposite the Holden House, is one of the most attractive pharmacies in Northern New. York. It is elegantly fitted up with walnut and chestnut finishing, neatly frescoed ceilings, and is heavily stocked with pure drugs and the choicest toilet and fancy articles. The visitor will find at this store a great0variety of choice perfumes, brushes, fancy soaps, hand-glasses, etc., and the many notions that minister to health and comfort. Dr. Lamberton, besides being a- gentleman, is a graduate of the School of Pharmacy, whose thorough knowledge of the science has won for him the confidence and large patronage of the leading physicians of Saratoga. He has associated with him competent and obliging assistants, some of whom are constantly at the store in readiness to prepare prescriptions at any hour of the day or night. Such a well-regulated pharmacy is worthy the extensive patronage Lamberton & Co. receive from the best citizens of Saratoga, and visitors can rely upon polite and prompt attention if they wiE favor this house with their patronage while sojourning at the Springs. For the special accommodation of visitors at the Grand Union, Congress Hall and vicinitv, Messrs. Lamberton & Co. have opened a branch store at No. 2 Grand Union Hotel. Besides polite attention the visitor will receive a beautiful stereoscopic view of the interior of this elegant pharmacy by calling on Messrs. Lamberton & Co., either as patron or for sight-seeing

DR. DOW'S, TROY N.Y.  ~  HERMANN GNADENDORF, TROY N.Y.  ~  MAISON DORIN  LID, PARIS

 

 THREE OF MY LATEST DIGS, ALL ARE PRETTY SCARCE, THE GNADENDORF BEING MORE SCARCE. BOTH BOTTLES DATE TO 1870-880'S RANGE AND WERE DUG IN TROY ABOUT THE 8 FOOT LEVEL. THE LID..IT'S JUST COOL!!
 
Herman Gnadendorf, of Troy, N. Y., owner of one of the oldest drug stores in that section of the State, died suddenly last week. He was about thirty-five years of age, and was to have been married next month. Mr. Gnadendorf took great pride in his store, and those who have visited it say it is one of the finest to be found anywhere in the country. His laboratory was one of the most complete, and he made his own preparations, some of them well known for efficacy.

 

B.J. GOLDSMITH ~ SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y.
HERE IS A RARE BALTIMORE LOOP BLOB & 1/2 PINT FLASK FROM SARATOGA SPRINGS.

 B.J.GOLDSMITH

B.J. Goldsmith, Dealer in Fine Groceries, Wines, Liquors and Cigars, No. 372 Broadway.?This business was established by Mr. Goldsmith in 1865, since which period he has built up an extensive and influential patronage not only in Saratoga, but also in the adjoining counties. Mr. Goldsmith imports direct from the most celebrated European houses and supplies all the principal hotels in the town. His store is spacious and is fully stocked with a superior assortment of fancy and staple groceries, wines, liquors and cigars, which are unrivalled for quality and excellence, and have no superiors in this country. The wines include all the famous champagnes in the market, the clarets of J. Calvet & Co., Barton & Guestier, Clossma & Co., etc., while the brandies are from the noted houses of Hennessey & Co., Martell, J. Rohins & Co., and J. S. Dulary & Co. All kinds of the finest groceries are to be found here, all quoted at extremely low prices. A specialty is made of cigars, both imported and domestic, the leading brand being "La Tntegudad," which is unsurpassed for flavor and superiority. ln the selection of cigars, Mr. Goldsmith has had an experience of thirty years, and feels confident that smokers will find it to their advantage to favor hfm with a call. ln all departments of his business. Mr. Goldsmith has always successfully aimed to give entire satisfaction to his numerous patrons, and is highly esteemed by the community for his enterprise, business capacity, and integrity. He was born in Poland, but has resided in the United States for the last thirty-two vear

B.J. Goldsmith, son of T.D. and Martha Goldsmith, b. Poland, s. 1863, Tobacconist, 376 Broadway.

Goldsmith, Benjamin Judah was born in Russia, Poland, March 15, 1840. He came to the United States in 1857, settling first in New York,. where he learned the cigar maker's trade. He remained in that city until 1863, when he removed to Saratoga Springs, and was engaged in the manufacture of cigars there from 1865 to 1873. In the latter year he established himself in the wine, liquor and cigar business. Mr. Goldsmith is a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Saratoga Springs. N. Y. He has been twice married; his first wife was Mary J. Howe. who died in 1872, leaving one daughter, Nina; and his second wife was Eliza Cohn, and they have one son, Irving Goldsmith. 

1906 ~  The Hudson Valley Construction Co., of Troy, have secured the contract for the erection of an Arcade building at Saratoga Springs for B. J. Goldsmith, to cost $80,000.

CHAS. FISH,  SARATOGA~  MINGAYS MAGIC RELIEF ~ FRED MENGES, SARATOGA

 Geo. H. Fish & Son, Druggists and Apothecaries, No. 104 Broadway, Saratoga Springs, N. Y., publish an advertisement on page 184. This firm has been so long and favorably known, (having been established in 1840.) that any commendation from us would be entirely superfluous. Suffice it to say that they keep always on hand a large and choice stock of Drugs and Medicines, Chemicals, Toilet articles and everything usually kept in a first-class Drug store. They buy strictly for cash, and directly from Manufacturers and Importers, and can therefore offer special inducements to customers. Particular attention given to prescriptions and family recipes.

 

Chas. F. Fish, Druggist and Apothecary, No. 348 Broadway.? The leading establishment of this kind at the Springs is that of Mr. Chas. F. Fish, druggist and apothecary, which has been in existence for almost half a century. The business was founded in 1840 by Mr. G. H. Fish, the firm subsequently becoming G. H. Fish ,St Sons, and later still, J. H. Fish & Son. ln 1883 the senior member of the firm died, after a most honorable and useful career, and his son, the present proprietor, succeeded to the entire control of affairs. The store occupied has dimensions of 18 x 100 feet, and is elegantly appointed with handsome fixtures, plate glass show cases, and attractive shelf-ware, and an artistic soda fountain, purchased at a cost of $3,000, adds still further to the tasteful appearance of the place. A splendid stock is carried, the assortment embracing every description of drugs, chemicals, mineral waters and medicines, pharmaceutical specialties, toilet goods and fancy articles, perfumery, surgical appliances, and druggists' sundries in general. A staff of experienced assistants is employed, and a leading specialty is made of the compounding of  physicians' prescriptions, the purest ingredients only being utilized, while absolute accuracy is assured in every instance. Mr. Fish, who is a native of this town, is a member of the New York State Pharmaceutical Association. He is the inventor of those well-known specialties: Quinine Plasters and Curaline of Tartar, which have had such a large sale, and which are really meritable articles.

 

  WELLS PHARMACY, SARATOGA

 

 

  VARIANTS OF WELLS PHARMACY, SARATOGA NEW YORK.

 

 

[table][graphic]

 

 

WELLS' PILL-COATING MACHINE..

The apparatus for coating pills with gelatin, here described, is the invention of Charles C. Wells, a pharmacist of Saratoga Springs, New York. The mode of employing it, as thus described by the inventor, explains the various features of the apparatus.The pills to be coated are placed upon the upper part of the piok-up (B), and roll down into the grooves. The needle-bar (A) is inverted so that the needle-points project downward through the notches of the pick-up and into the pills, thereby fastening a pill on each needle-point. When the needle-bar is lifted up, pills will roll into the place of those picked up. In the cover of the water bath (C) is a trough holding the solution for coating the pills; dip the pills on the needles into the solution, and slide the needle-bars (A) into one of the grooves of the drying cylinder (D), which is kept revolving until the pills are dry enough to take from the needles; then withdraw the needlebar (A) from the drying cylinder (D), place the needles in the notches of the upper edge of B, the pills below the strip, draw upward the needle-bar (A), and the pills will be stripped off the needles, and the bar (A) free to repeat the operation.

Sesquicakboxate Of Potassium.—Herr Rammelsberg describes a sesquicarbonate of potassium which had been produced by the evaporation of a large quantity of solution of bicarbonate of potassium in Struve's mineral water manufactory. The crystals, which belonged to the rhombic system, were represented by the formula (2K2C03,H,C03.3 HsO). The conditions under which they were formed are not understood, as all attempts at their reproduction failed. When a solution of potassium bicarbonate was exposed for a fortnight over caustic potash and sulphuric acid, so that half the carbonic acid was withdrawn, potassium carbonate was formed. By heating a solution of potassium bicarbonate untilhalfthe carbonicacid had been expelled, potassium carbonate was formed in the solution, whereas in order to obtain the sesquicarbonate it is theoretically necessary to expel three-fourths of the carbonic acid.

JOHN LUTHER ~ F.E. MITCHELL, BALLSTON SPA

 

MY VERY SCARCE F.E. MITCHELL PHARMACY FROM HEMP HILL BLOCK ON

MILTON AVE., LATER RENAMED GLEASON BLOCK AND DATES TO 1870-90S/ JOHN LUTHER DRUGGIST, BALLSTON SPA NEW YORK. A VERY HARD TO FIND LOCAL DRUGGIST BOTTLE ALSO IN MINT CONDITION.

F. E. Mitchell, Pharmacy, Gleason Block.—Among the leading members of the pharmaceutical profession in this vicinity may be mentioned the name of F. E. Mitchell, who makes a specialty of compounding Physicians' prescriptions and family recipes in the most careful and accurate manner, from pure ingredients in every instance, while bottom prices likewise prevail. The store is compact, ample and finely appointed, and a large, first class stock is constantly kept on hand, including pure and fresh drugs, medicines and chemicals of every description, all the standard proprietary remedies, acids, extracts, flavors, herbs, barks and medicinal roots, pure wines and liquors for medical use, mineral waters and kindred beverages; a handsome soda fountain being one of the.features of the establishment. A full and fine assortment of toilet articles, perfumery, soaps, sponges, chamois and everything comprehended in druggists' sundries is carried; also, while a competent assistant is in attendance, the proprietor, however, exercises close personal supervision over the prescription department, and altogether Mr. Mitchell does a very nice trade. This business was originally established in 1869 by Winnie & Hunt, who were succeeded by C. W. Gould & Co., who were in turn succeeded in 1881 by the firm of Redmond & Mitchell. Under this style the business was conducted up to 1887, when Mr. Mitchell assumed sole control, and has since continued it with uniform success, moving to the present location some three or four months ago. Mr. Mitchell is a native of Ballston, is a capable and efficient pharmacist, and fully merits the flattering patronage he enjoys.

 

  SARATOGA ICE COMPANY                  SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y.

 

The Saratoga Ice Co., Saratoga Springs, N. Y., has harvested ice about six inches in thickness from Loughberry Lake.The Maple Ave. Garage was formerly Saratoga Ice Co. which cut natural ice from Loughberry Lake. Burned in 1951

 

FRANKLINS, TROY N.Y. ~   LEAKE & WELCH, MECHANICVILLE  N.Y. ~   C.W.HART, TROY N.Y.

 

 SOME OF MY LATEST DIGS,ALL THREE CAME FROM SAME DIG ALONG WITH SOME OTHER SCARCE TOO RARE BOTTLES. FIRST IS FRANKLINS BABY'S TREASURE TROY N.Y.~ A VERY COOL CRAMER'S KIDNEY CURE FROM ALBANY  N.Y. -WITH ALL THE "N'S" BACKWARD...AND ONE  I HAVE WANTED FOR SOME TIME~C.W.HART & CO. STOVE POLISH,TROY N.Y. PRETTY SCARCE TOO.

 ******************************************************************************

CRAMER CHEMICAL, CO. ALBANY, N.Y.,

Manufacturers of Cramer's Kidney and Liver Cure and Vegetable Pills, will forward to any druggist sending us his name, free from all charges, dummies for window displays, show cards, also a gnod supply of our new books called "Blink of Wisdom."

 C. W. Hart & Co.. (H. B. Dum-mer.) manufacturers of the funnel- paste stove polish, granite cement, indestructible stove putty, petrified  furnace cement, and shine-shine starch polish, Nos. 652 and 654 River Street.
Firm formed March i, 1886.

.C. W. HART & CO., 052 and 654 River Street, Troy, N. LADIES! DO YOU WANT AN EXTRA GOOD STOVE POLISH ? If so, ask your Grocer for a package of HART'S FUNNEL PASTE. We claim for our Polish several qualifications* 1st. The package is convenient to use, as the tube of the funnel serves as * handle, thereby preventing the soiling of the hands while polishing ymir stoves. 2d. The polish is ready mixed for use, and produces an instantaneous lustre, without laborious rubbing. 3d. It givt-s your stove a jet black, enamel-like shine, which will outlast and outshine any thing you have ever tried. 4th. It does not fil All your house, with a disagreeable odor, nor cause your  stoves or pipe to rust when put away for the season. Please give it a fair trial, and you" will be- convincinced of its superiority. on receipt of sixteen cents in stamps to prepay postage and packing, we will send one sample Funnel. We have the nobbiest stove brush whieh will be sent on receipt of eleven cents In stamps, or we will send one Funnel and one brush for five cents. Ask for Hart's Funnel Paste Stove Polish, and take no other. We copy extracts from two of our many recommendations:N. S. Vedder, Pattern Works, Stove Patterns in Wood and Iron, River Street, Corner Hoosic .C. W. Hart?Dear Sir: I  have for two years or more observed the very fine and lasting lustre your Funnel Paste Stove Polish has put upon the (tarnpic stove in our manufactory. Recently I have had occasion to have a dozen new stoves blacked, ami gave my man some of the Funnel Paste Stove Polish that we had On hand a long time. It did admirable work,  : 'This Marking Is jnst magnif, never saw any thing like it . I  accomplhln'd three days work in one, or three times as much as we had done with other blackings. It will only have to be known to win a large trade."Troy, N. Y, Jan. 25, lS94. Respectfully, H. Cut Bascom. 

WINNIE & HUNT APOTHECARIES, BALLSTON SPA N.Y. ~ WALKERS PHARMACY. SCHENECTADY N.Y.

 

THIS IS A RARE BOTTLE AND THE ONLY EXAMPLE I HAVE EVER COME ACROSS IN ALL MY YEARS OF COLLECTING , SEE BELOW FOR THE CONNECTION TO OTHER BALLSTON SPA N.Y. DRUGGIST/APOTHECARY SHOPS. 

NOTE THE SPELLING ERROR

ON THE RIGHT IS ONE FROM WALKERS PHARMACY IN SCHENECTADY

 

WHINNIE & HUNT 

This business was  established in 1869 by Winnie & Hunt
G.M.Whinnie
Henry H. Hunt, Balston Spa, New York.
Mr. H. H. Hunt died August 31st, 1877, at Ballston Spa, N. Y., of consumption, aged twenty-seven years and ten months. Mr. Hunt was born at Edinburgh,N Y in 1849. Selecting pharmacy as a profession, he entered the drug house of G. M. Winnie, of Ballston Spa, and subsequently formed a copartnership with his preceptor  under the firm style of Winnie & Hunt . On the death of Mr. Winnie, which occurred shortly afterwards Mr. Hunt became sole proprietor and continued in the same place of business in which be first entered  Having passed through the various grades of apprentice, clerk, partner, and proprietor the deceased leaves a wife and two children. He became a member of our Association at Philadelphia in 1876.
 
 
 
WALKERS PHARMACY, SCHENECTADY,N.Y.
 

 Schenectady circa 1950, looking west down State Street from Crescent Park

 

The Lorraine Block sign showed up in downtown Schenectady postcards for over sixty years. When the Lorraine was nearly new in 1906, Walkers' Pharmacy was in the main storefront and the photographic studio of Eugene Clare, the dental office of Elmo Getz, and the real estate-insurance-law offices of Albert and Horace Van Voast were among the businesses upstairs. Like many buildings in this scene, the Lorraine Block disappeared in the 1960s. Today the corner of State and Clinton is occupied by an undistinguished modern bank.

  WINCHELL & DAVIS                                                    ALBANY ~ N.Y.

TWO OF MY LOCAL ALBANY PIECES, THE FLASK IS PRETTY SCARCE AS IS THE "OCB" MINI JUG.

Winchell & Davis Importing Co. Wines,Liqueurs etc.

504-506 Broadway, Albany,New York

The company used the brand names"Albany Club", "Good Old O C B", and "O. C. B..

"THE WINCHELL & DAVIS IMPORTING CO., of Albany, N. Y., have filed papers of incorporation with the Secretary of State. The capital is $30,000. The company is organized to import and deal in wines, liquors and mineral waters. It begins business with $10,000. The directors are Harry N. Pitt, Joseph C. Powers, Emma M. Dearman, William R. Winchell, and Jarard S. R. Davis.

 

WINCHELL & DAVIS ADS

  GURN SPRING COMPANY  ~ J.W. COLTON LABORTORY   SARATOGA SPRINGS, NEW YORK






HERE IS ONE OF MY LATEST ADDITIONS, A QUART SIZE GURN SPRINGS FROM SARATOGA N.Y A PRETTY SCARCE BOTTLE.  A VERY HARD TO GET 11 INCH J.W. COLTON LAB BOTTLE DATED TO 1870S FROM SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y.    

THE GURN SPRING, SARATOGA SPRINGS NEW YORK 

The two springs at Emerson?s Corners (Gurn Springs) were on Ira Roods property in 1898.  In 1909 the springs were sold to Leslie A. Cook, who developed the springs and bottled the water.  The Gurn Springs Bottling Plant was in operation in the early part of the 20th century.  Many favored the mineral waters from the springs located near the Snook Kill stream in the north-central part of the town, as they were extremely effervescent.  The photo was taken about 1914 

To the north of Saratoga the Gurn spring apparently emerges from the Little Falls dolomite. The vent is some feet below the capping of gravel and is no longer visible, but the nearest outcrops are all of the dolomite.

0f the geological history of the district from the close of the time marked by the formation of the slates ? that is, from the later Ordovicic period ? we have but scant records, as will be set forth in the report of Professor dishing and Doctor Ruedemann. Whether other sediments once covered the slates and were then removed by erosion is doubtful. The lack of sediments suggests land conditions at least for the greater part of the time. The strata shared in the mountainous uplifts to some extent, but near the springs the dips are still very flat and notable folds are not immediately concerned with them. Important faulting has taken place and one fault in particular, as will next be described, has an intimate relationship to the springs.

 RARE VARIANT JOHN H. STOCK "ELECTRIC CITY BOTTLING WORKS" SCHENECTADY N.Y.

THIS IS A BOTTLE I DUG IN MECHANICVILLE N.Y., IN MY COPY OF ROY TOPKA'S BOOK ON SCHENECTADY BOTTLES I FINALLY FOUND INFORMATION ON THIS ONE.

IN 1898, JOHN H. STOCK WAS LISTED AS A BOTTLER AND SODA MANUFACTUER AT 23 NORTH COLLEGE STREET. IN 1899, HE WAS LISTED AT 217~219 DOCK STREET AND REMAINED THERE UNTIL 1907. JOHN STOCKS ADVERTISMENT IN THE 1898 SCHENECTADY DIRECTORY STATED THAT HE BOTTLED ALL KINDS OF MINERAL WATERS, SODA,SARSAPARILLA, GINGER ALE AND WAS EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR WEISS BEER.HE WAS ALSO A BOTTLER FOR DOBLER BREWING FROM ALBANY NEW YORK.

THERE ARE 4 KNOWN VARIANTS FROM THIS BOTTLER PER ROY, AND IF ANYONE KNOWS SCHENECTADY BOTTLES...IT'S ROY.

1~ JOHN H. STOCK  SCHENECTADY N.Y. DOBLER BREWING CO.

TRADEMARK  {DOBLER TM WITH HAND HOLDING MUG OF BEER}

REGISTERED  THIS BOTTLE NOT TO BE SOLD

BEER SHAPE BOTTLE, 9 5/8 INCHES, MEDIUM AMBER  NO KNOWN VARIANTS UNCOMMON, A DESIRABLE BOTTLE DUE TO DOBLER TRADEMARK. 198~EARLY 1900S

2~ JOHN H. STOCK SCHENECTADY N.Y. REGISTERED ELECTRIC CITY BOTTLING WORKS

 {JHS MONGRAM} BEER BOTTLE SHAPE, AMBER 9 1/2 INCHES TALL 1898~EARLY 1900S

VARIANT~ A VERY DESIRABLE BLOWN CROWN CAP CLOSURE . UNCOMMON, A VALUABLE PIECE BECAUSE OF THE ELECTRIC CITY EMBOSSING

3~ JOHN H. STOCK SCHNECTADY N.Y. WEBERS WEISS BEER

THIS BOTTLE NOT TO BE SOLD. SQUAT BEER SHAPE, 7 1/8 INCHES TALL,

 1898~ EARLY 1900S , UNCOMMON  AMBERS, NOTE THE MISPELLED "SCHENECTADY" ALL OF THIS BOTTLE SEEN TO THIS POINT HAVE MISPELLING.

4~ JOHN H. STOCK SCHENECTADY N.Y. {J.H.S. MONOGRAM} HUTCH BOTTLE CLEAR/AQUA/AMETHYST, 1898~ EARLY 1900S  VARIANT-NO MONOGRAM, COMMON

DR VAN WERTS BALSAM ~ WATERTOWN N.Y.

NICE APPLE GREEN DR. VAN WERTS FROM WATERTOWN N.Y

The Misbranding of "Dr.VanWert's Balsam for the Lungs" Samuel Felt (Van Wert Chemical Co.)
On March 19, 1915, the United States attorney for the Northern District of New York, acting upon a report by the Secretary of Agriculture, filed in the District Court of the United

States for said district an information against Samuel Felt, trading under the firm name of Van Wert Chemical Co.,

Watertown, N. Y., alleging shipment by said defendant, in violation of the Food and Drugs Act, as amended, on or

about December 20, 1912, from the State of New York into the State of Massachusetts, of a quantity of " Dr. Van Wert's Balsam for the Lungs which was misbranded. The product

was labeled:(On carton) Dr. Van Wert's Balsam for the Lungs The Great No. 2858. Guaranteed under the Food and

Drugs Act, June 30, '06 Chloroform 4 min. to oz. Morphine 1 gr. to oz. Cure Price 25 cts. Manufactured by the Van Wert Chemical Co. Watertown, N. Y. Registered in U. S. Patent Office in 1885 By Van Wert Chemical Co. For Asthma Bronchitis Croup & Whooping Cough The Success of This Medicine Has Induced Many Imitators to Copy the Word Balsam Be Sure You Ask For Dr. Van Wert's And Take No Other Keep in a Cool Place Shake Well Before Using. Van Wert Chemical Co, For Consumption Coughs & Colds." (On bottle) "Dr. Van Wert's Balsam for Consumption, Coughs, Colds, Hoarseness, Croup, Whooping Cough, Asthma, Bronchitis, and all diseases of the Throat and Lungs. Directions. Keep bottle tightly corked and shake well before using. Dose. Ten or twelve drops to be taken as often as the tickling in the throat, which precedes a cough, is felt. In this way the affected membranes are treated to the continuous influence of the Balsam. If preferred, one teaspoonful may be taken after each meal, and upon retiring at night. For a child of ten years and under, five drops should be given on the occasion of every paroxysm of coughing. For infants, 2 drops in teaspoonful of water every hour. Price, 25 cents. Prepared only by Van Wert Chemical Co., Watertown, N. Y. Registered in United States Patent Office" (Blown in bottle) " Dr. Van Wert's Balsam Van Wert Chemical Co.Watertown, N. Y."
Analysis of a sample of the product by the Bureau of Chemistry of this department showed the following results:
Chloroform  (minims per fluid ounce) 2.6 / Morphine (grains per fluid ounce) 0.18 / Alcohol (per cent by volume) 0.73 / Ammonium chlorid (grains per fluid ounce) 5.2 / Ash  (per cent) 0.13 / Glucose (per cent) 51.5
The only medicinal ingredients of this preparation are morphine, chloroform, and ammonium chlorid, together with a small amount of alcohol; the base of the preparation is a water solution of glucose. Misbranding of the article was alleged in the information for the reason that the following statements regarding the therapeutic or curative effects thereof,appearing on the label aforesaid, to wit, "Balsam for the Lungs The Great Cures For Asthma & Whooping Cough
For Consumption Balsam for Consumption Whooping Cough, Asthma and all diseases of the Throat and Lungs were false and fraudulent in this, that the same wrere applied to said article knowingly and in reckless and wanton disregard of their truth or falsity so as to represent falsely and fraudulently to the purchasers thereof, and create in the minds of purchasers thereof the impression and belief, that it was in whole or in part composed of, or contained, ingredients or medicinal agents effective for the cure of asthma, whooping cough,consumption, and all diseases of the throat and lungs; when, in truth and in fact, said article was not in whole or in part composed of, and did not contain, ingredients or medicinal agents effective for the cure of asthma, whooping cough, consumption, or all diseases of the throat and lungs. Misbranding was alleged for the further reason that the article contains 0.18 grain of morphine, and 2.64 minims of chloroform per fluid ounce, and the package then and there failed to bear a statement on the label of the bottle of the quantity or proportion of morphine and chloroform contained therein.
On April 6, 1915, the defendant entered a plea of guilty to the information,and the court imposed a fine of $10.00.
CAKL VBOOMAN, Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
WASHINGTON, D. C, December 4, 1915.

 A.M. KNOWLSON ~ DRUGGIST.                                                TROY N.Y.

Alexander M. Knowlson, No. 350 Broadway. He possesses one of the most attractive drug, medicine and prescription stores in the city. Spacious, well-lighted, tastefully furnished, it presents those admirable features comporting with the business which he has so long and successfully conducted. His first predecessor, Charles Heimstreet, began it at No. 10 State Street, in January, 1836. The latter, in 1851, and his clerk, William E. Hagan, formed the partnership of Charles Heimstreet & Co. On the death of the senior partner, November 25, 1854, William E. Hagan, succeeded to the business, which he conducted until 1858, when he and Fitz Henry Knight became partners in the firm of William E. Hagan & Co. In 1861 F. H. Knight withdrew to enter the army. In November, 1862, William E. Hagan moved his store to No. I First Street, south of the Troy House. On February 16, 1864, Alexander M. Knowlson purchased the stock and interest of William E. Hagan and continued in the business at the same place until January, 10, 1871, when he moved to the building No. 350 Broadway. Besides having all the conveniences of a judiciously arranged pharmaceutical establishment, the store contains a large and expensive stock of drugs and medicines. Knowlson's 4711 cologne, tooth-wash, aromatic dentifrice, glycerine jelly, quinine hair-tonic, and other special toilet preparations sustain the high commendation bestowed upon them. In the prescription department the best and finest drugs are used, and the compounding of them is done only by registered pharmacists. In the manufacture of butter of cocoa suppositories by the cold process, which secures an equal distribution of the medicinal ingredients, Knowlson's patent suppository machine is used. Being equal in weight and uniform in shape, the Knowlson suppositories are superior to those differently made. The mineral waters of Saratoga can be obtained on draught at the store in the natural condition in which they were taken from the different springs, being hydrostatically drawn from block-tin lined barrels by an automatic apparatus devised by Prof. D. M. Greene, of Troy. A. M. Knowlson also has for sale an exceedingly large collection of choice and rare roses and other cut flowers from numerous green houses in the vicinity of Troy and New York City. His command of any number or kind of flowers is almost unlimited, and persons desiring any for weddings, receptions, dinners or other entertainments, can obtain them at short notice by leaving orders at the store or by transmitting them by telephone. Bouquets and floral designs are made by an artist specially employed by him for such work.  BY A. M. KNOWLSON, TROY, N. Y.  I have read with interest the articles of A'lessrs. Kennedy and Kemble on suppositories, in the "Amer. Journ. Pharm." for the months of February and March, respectively, and would crave a small space in your valuable Journal to say a word on the same subject; audi alteram partem. Each of the articles referred to strongly objects to the moulding of suppositories by a machine ; and one rather pointedly intimates that the great end in view of the pharmacist who prepares them, is simply to turn off a great quantity of elegant preparations, and at a large profit to the manufacturer, without any regard to the poor sufferer who is to use them. Now, while this statement may be true, the writer is not inclined to hold so low an estimate of his fellow-craftsmen ; may he suggest that perhaps one reason for the dislike evinced by those gentlemen to the use of a machine, is simply because they have tried none but the oldfashioned one (which truly is open to the objections stated). For some years past I have used a mould of my own invention, which is not liable to the same objections as the one above referred to. My suppositories are moulded by the cold process (which I deem preferable to that of melting), thus securing a more equal distribution of the medicinal ingredients ; and, being shaped by the machine, are always equal in weight and of uniform shape. Mr. Mattison, in his article (March, 1875), has fully explained the modus operandi, in reference to the manufacture of the suppositories, save that I differ with him in preferring to use the cacao butter without melting. Should any pharmacist or physician desire more particular information in regard to or description of my mould for vaginal, intra uterine and rectum suppositories, I should be happy to furnish it.

CLEMENT & RICE  APOTHECARIES ~ ALBANY N.Y.
A RECENT DIG TRADE, ONLY ONE I HAVE EVER HEARD OF SURFACING AND WITHOUT DAMAGE STANDING 6 INCHES TALL, DATING TO LATE MID 1800S
 
CLEMENT & RICE, BROADWAY ~ CORNER OF CLINTON AVE. ALBANY, NEW YORK ..

—H. B. Clement and H. J. Grose have formed a copartnership under the firm name of H. B. Clement & Co., who will hereafter conduct the druggist and apothecary business in Albany, at the old corner established by Mr. Clement in 1859. Mr. Grose has long been associated with Mr. Louis Sautter as pharmacist at his Tweddle Hall Pharmacy.

—E. T. Rice, formerly of the firm of Clement & Rice, succeeds Dr. John L. Cooper at No. 13 Clinton avenue, Albany, in the drug business. Dr. Cooper is engaged in the practice of medicine; office, 705 Broadway, Albany. .
 

1885-The firm of Clement & Rice, of Albany, has been remodelled, and Mr. E. T. Rice has purchased the store 13 Clinton avenue, where he succeeds Dr. John L. Cooper.

Mr. H. J. Grose, formerly with L. Sautter, is now a partner with H. B. Clement under the firm name of H. B. Clement & Co., at the old stand.


FRANK MELVILLE CLEMENT, Ph.cx., M.D. Frank Melville Clement, physician and surgeon in active practice in Chicago, Illinois, and a former practitioner in Albany, New York, was born in the city last mentioned, August 19, 1863, son of Henry B. Clement and Huldah R. Niven, his wife, and comes of old American stock.

His earlier education was obtained in Albany public schools and he graduated from the high school in 1882. After leaving school he was employed in the prescription department of the drug store of Clement & Rice, and remained there until 1887. At the same time he was a student in the Albany College of Pharmacy, where he finished his course and graduated in 1884, Ph.G. Still biter he matriculated at Albany Medical College, the medical department of Union University, and graduated from that institution in 1890, with the degree of M.D.

Time it is that Dr. Clement holds the degrees of two departments of Union University, and his subsequent professional career has shown him worthy of the diplomas of almamater. After leaving the medical college he practiced in Albany less than one year, then removed to Chicago, and in that city has come to occupy an enviable place in professional circles. He is a member of the American Medical Association and the Chicago Medical Society. He is a Republican, but not specially active in politics. On the 30th of October, 1895, Dr. Clement married Virgenia C. Callanan, and has two childrenFrances Virgenia Clement, age seven years, and Henry Melville Clement, age four years.
LEAKE & WELCH MECHANICSVILLE, WM. J. REINECK, ALBANY N.Y., HALLENBECK & MESSIER

             

 HERE ARE A FEW OF MY FAVORITES AND THEE LEAKE & WECH IS ONLY ONE KNOWN AT THIS TIME, SCARCE WM. J. REINECK HUTCH ALBANY NEW YORK WITH SHAKING HANDS,DATED 1885 ON REVERSE AND ....UNIQUE AND SCARCE MUG BASE, HALLENBECK & MESSIER WITH DEER HEAD ON BACK WITH BID SITTING ON HIS ANTLER

 

J.ROMROTH, TROY NY  SCOTT'S SPRINGS, SCHENECTADY NY  VERNON & O'BRYAN, MECHANICVILLE NY
 
 
A FEW MORE HUTCHES, RAMROTH 1882, SCOTT'S SPRING BOTTLING WORKS SCHENECTADY NY AND A VERY SCARCE 1896 VERNON & O'BRYAN MECHANICVILLE NY, YOU WILL SEE 100 +/- 1897 VARIANTS TO ONE 1896.
 FITCHETT, SARATOGA ~   J.M. COLCORD, SARATOGA ~   FRED MENGES, SARATOGA SPRINGS 

                                 

 

  CHAS. F. FISH   ~  J.M.COLCORD  ~   I.P. FITCHETT & MINGAYS  ~  SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y.

LOUIS H. GAUS ~ PHARMACIST, ALBANY N.Y. ~ L. BURTON ~ DRUGGIST, TROY N.Y.

A LOCAL AND VERY HARD TO FIND PHARMACY BOTTLE DATING TO 1880'S RANGE. LOUIS H. GAUS PHARMACY, 254 PEARL STREET

ON THE RIGHT IS A SCARCE TROY N.Y. DRUGGIST FROM L. BURTON

LOUIS H. GAUS ~ PHARMACIST, ALBANY N.Y.

Louis Gaus commenced business at 254 South Pearl street in 1876. He purchased from C. Sprimhart, who had conducted a similar business from 1850

1918 -  Dr. Herbert Louis Gaus (A. M. C. '07), with commission as Major is on duty at Spartanburg, S. C, awaiting departure for France

R. W. Walker, New York agent for J. W. Tufts, has put in a new fountain at the drug store of Louis H. Gaus, Albany, N. Y.

1910

Dr. Louis H. Gaus served as Director from September 15th, 1909 to November 17th, 1910, at which date he was succeeded by Dr. W. E. Lundblad, coming direct to us from the Bender Laboratory at Albany.

Exclusive of the salary paid the Director and of some expense caused by breakage, the total operating expense of the Laboratory for the year was $99.49.

Natural gas was used for fuel and for operating some of the instruments. During the severe weather of the winter of 1909-1910 the supply of gas became greatly reduced and many of the chemicals and specimens were spoiled and considerable damage caused. The expense of replacing the breakage of glassware, instruments, and damage to chemicals and plumbing was $129.52.

An arrangement has been now made for the use of coal during the severe weather and we hope that similar trouble will not occur again.

Your Committee would recommend that all work for the coming year be done without charge to the person sending in the specimens, except as to a few items which require the use of expensive chemicals or other supplies and as to this work, only a nominal charge be made to partially reimburse the County for the expense.

While a great deal of work has been accomplished in the past year, yet more work can be done during the coming year and at little if any additional expense. We believe that under the direction of Dr. Lundblad and with the co-operation of the physicians of the County, the Laboratory's usefulness during the coming year will be greatly enhanced.

Respectfully submitted,

GEO. NOLD, Chairman.  ROBERT C. TURNBULL,  D. C. HUNTER,  J. J. O'HARA,  JOHN D. TAYLOR,
Committee.

 S.H. HALL, MECHANICVILLE N.Y.     GEM PHARMACY {C.H.WHITNEY} MECHANICVILLE N.Y.

             THREE LOCALS ALL FROM SAME DIG, S.H. HALL DRUGGIST PURE DRUGS MECHANICVILLE,NEW YORK, TWO VARIANTS & THE GEM PHARMACY C.H. WHITNEY PROP. PURE DRUGS,CORNER MAIN & RIVER STREETS MECHANICVILLE, NEW YORK. ALL DATE TO THE 1870~90S RANGE.

 LINCOLN SPRING CO. ~ SARATOGA SPRINGS, NEW YORK

 



LINCOLN SPRING COMPANY & BATHS

     MY VERY NICE SARATOGA LINCOLN SPRING CO. QUART BLOB I DUG RECENTLY IN A SMALL PRIVY IN GALWAY..........SWEET.

 THE LINCOLN SPRINGS WERE DRILLED FROM 1896 ~ 1910 ON SOUTH BROADWAY ON LAND OWNED BY THE LINCOLN SPRING COMPANY & THE NATURAL CARBONIC GAS CO.

THEY WERE DRILLED 350 ~ 425 FEET DEEP THROUGH DOLOMITE, ALL ARE EXTRAORDINARILY HIGHLY CARBONATED. THESE SPRINGS WERE VALUABLE FOR YIELDING CARBON DIOXIDE GAS FOR BOTTLING. IN 19911 THEY WERE TAKEN OVER BY THE STATE OF NEW YORK AND THE PUMPING OF WATER FOR THE GAS WAS STOPPED.THERE WERE 80~100 SPRINGS ON THE PROPERTY AT THE TIME. THEY WERE DESIGNATED BY LETTERS AND NUMBERS AND NOT NAMED AS OTHER SPRINGS WERE, MOST HAVE BEEN CAPPED.

THE REMAINING ARE USED TO SUPPLY WATER TO THE LINCOLN SPRING BATH HOUSES.THEIR HIGH GAS CONTENT MAKING THEM IDEAL FOR THIS PURPOSE. THE FIVE WELLS  SUPPLY 24'000 GALLONS A DAY TO THE BATH HOUSES.DURING THE MORNING HOURS ONE HUNDRED BATHS,EACH USING SIXTY GALLONS OF WATER ARE GIVEN PER HOUR.SOME OF THE LINCOLN WATER IS FOR THE FOUNTAINS FOR DRINKING PURPOSES FROM 1920 ~ 1960 THERE WAS A FOUNTAIN OPPOSITE THE MAIN ENTRANCE OF THE CASINO.LINCOLN WATER WAS PIPED TO IT AND ANOTHER FOUNTAIN  ON THE CORNER OF SPRING AND PUTNAM STREETS (NOW A PARKING LOT) AND SUPPLIED A SUPPLEMENTAL SUPPLY TO THE BATHS ON PHILA STREET. OVER THE YEARS THE PIPES CORRODED AND WERE ABANDONED

 

   EDWARD J. HEFFERNAN        SARATOGA SPRINGS, NEW YORK

 

  Heffernan, Edward J., was born in Saratoga Springs, August 29, 1856, a son of Peter and Sarah (Gunning) Heffernan. His mother's father was one of the old landmarks of Saratoga Springs and her brother, John Gunning, was a prominent lawyer. Mr. Heffernan learned the printing trade with B. F. Judson in his boyhood, and in the days of hand composition, before the advent of the typesetting machines, he was one of the most rapid compositors in this part of the country.,working the greater part of the time on the Daily Saratogian. 

He followed this trade from 1869 to 1889, and in September of the latter year embarked in the bottling business, which he has since conducted. Here his energy and enterprise met with swift recognition and prompt success, and he has built up one of the largest and most lucrative trades in his line in that part of the State. He is one of the best known men in public life in Saratoga Springs. He was elected excise commissioner for two terms (six years), and is serving his second term on the board of trustees. He was first elected for the old Second ward and now represents the Fourth ward, the first term being for the years 1892-93, his present term for 1897-98. On April 24, 1878, Mr. Heffernan married Catherine Farrell.  He is a member of the Order of Elks, the Ancient Order of Hibernians, the C. M. B. A. and the Typographical Union.

Mr. Heffernan has always been a straight, sterling and strenuous Democrat, and he is a power in the organization. He served on the Board of Excise Commissioners for many years, and has also been for several terms a member of the village Board of Trustees. He is a strong man, with brains and courage, and his gift for leadership brings him always to the front in every enterprise in which he is engaged. He has been a delegate to the Democratic State Convention and also to many. other conventions, and he has been recognized as one of the most influential Democrats in Saratoga County.

Mr. Heffernan married Miss Catherine Farrell, April 24, 1878. He is very popular, both socially and in business, and has a large army of devoted friends.

 

~ J.H. FARRINGTON ~ SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y. ~

ON THE RIGHT IS THE  J.H. FARRINGTON HOUSE ON NORTH BROADWAY, SARATOGA SPRINGS LATE 1800'S,LONG TIME BOTTLER IN THE TOWN ALSO OWNED BICYCLE SHOP,CANDY MAKER AND DELVED IN THE BUSINESS OF WINES,LIQUOR'S AND GROCERY SERVICES.

THERE ARE A FEW VARIANTS OF THESE BOTTLES, I HAVE 4 NOW & AS TIME PERMITS I WILL PICTURE THEM ALL. 

 

NEW MONEY OVER OLD MONEY

J.H. Farrington, son of Jacob K. and Lucretia E. (Austin) Farrington, b. Otsego Falls, Essex Co., N.Y., s. 1861, Wholesale Wine Merchant, 446 Broadway
(NEWS ART.1886)  Some of the assessment companies make large gains through a harsh working of their lapsing conditions. Mr. J. H. Farrington, a wholesale candy dealer of  Saratoga Springs, N. Y., a policy-holder for $10,000, after paying $283.60 in two years, was assessed for a sum which  was to be paid by January 31, 1886. The company was the Mutual Trust Fund Life Association of New York. The policy-holder mailed the check the 29th of December.

 

It reached New York City after 3 p. m. of the 30th, Saturday. It was delivered to the insurance company Monday, the 1st, and the insured was frozen out This act the policyholder, in a letter to the New York Mercury, brands as strange and dishonorable. It is surely a sign of weakness if the company find it necessary to return to a policy holder his money, after that policy-holder has proved his worthiness to participate in the plan of insurance on which these companies are based. If the companies cannot stand by their old friends, their main idea is a bad one. Did they take in no new business that Monday on which they sent back Mr. Farrington's money ? Was new money better than old money ?

 TRAGEDY STRIKES THE FARRINGTON FAMILY

09 JUN 1902 in Saratoga,, New York
Fire early yesterday destroyed the Arcade and the Citizens National Bank block and the Shackelford building and caused the loss cf five lives. The dead are: Mrs. Elizabeth M. Mabee, suffocated and body rescued by firemen. Mrs. Sarah Owens, burned to death, body recovered. David Howland, burned to death, body recovered. Miss Farrington, burned to death body still in ruins The Arcade property was to have been sold at partition sale June 12. It is owned by the Shoemaker estate of Cincinnati, and Benjamin J. Goldsmith of this place. The exact origin 6f the fire has not yet been discovered.

 

 J.H. Farrington, son of Jacob K. and Lucretia E. (Austin) Farrington, b. Otsego Falls, Essex Co., N.Y., s. 1861, Wholesale Wine Merchant, 446 Broadway.

 

ON THE RIGHT IS A PICTURE OF MR. FARRINGTON IN FRONT OF HIS BICYCLE SHOP AT THE TURN OF THE CENTURY.

BOTTLE VARIANT'S

 

 

THREE VARIANT'S AT LEFT & RARE J.H. FARRINGTON TWO HANDLE JUG ON RIGHT ~ THERE IS A TOMBSTONE SLUG PLATE HUTCHINSON BOTTLE FROM HIS BOTTLING OPERATION AS WELL.

J.H.FARRINGTON ~ WINES,LIQUORS & CIGARS AD


 
 
 EARLY AD FROM ONE OF  MR. FARRINGTONS BUSINESS VENTURES, THE CANDY BUSINESS IS WHAT GOT HIM INVOLVED IN THE SODA BOTTLING BUSINESS OF WHICH HE DID A LARGE BUSINESS.

J.H. FARRINGTON STOPPER


 
 
J.H. FARRINGTON PORCELAIN TOPPED CORK STOPPER FROM HIS WINE & LIQUOR STORE LOCATED IN SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y. ~ 1900'S
 BREWING IN ALBANY NEW YORK IN 1800'S

BREWING.

Albany, as it is at the terminus of the canal and the head of navigation on the Hudson River, is well located for any manufacture. The hop and barley districts are near by, and Albany has established a national reputation in malt products. This important industry had its beginning with the infancy of the city, and the beer and ale interest has grown immensely.

In 1661, Arent Van Corlear was engaged in brewing here, and some authorities have it that in 1635, a brewery was located at Rensselaerwyck. In 1695, Ben. C. Corlaer and Albert Ryckman "were authorized and directed to brew, for the use

of the Common Council, three pipes of beer at £10 13s." One of the prominent brewers of the last century was Harme Gansevoort, who died in 1801. His brewery stood at the corner of Maiden lane and Dean street, and was demolished in 1807. As late as 1833, when the dome of Stanwix Hall was raised, the aged Dutchmen of the city compared it to the capacious brew-kettle of old Harme Gansevoort, whose fame was fresh in their memories.

About the beginning of the present century, a Mr. Gill was proud of the fact that he produced 150 barrels of beer yearly. In this city, during the year ending May 1, 1884, there were manufactured 359,203 barrels of malt liquors, an increase over the previous year of 26,409 barrels. The four breweries in Albany in 1820, are named on a near page.

Robert Dunlop was the first brewer in this city known to persons now living. He started a little brewery at the corner of Broadway and Quackenbush street. This was destroyed forty years ago. Andrew Kirk's brewery on Upper Broadway, now occupied by the Fort Orange Brewing Company, dates back to 1838. James K. Carroll is Treasurer of this Company; Edward F. Carroll, Secretary; and D. McDonald, Brewer. The John McKnight Brewery, on Hawk street, has not been used for years, and the premises are now owned and used by Thomas McCredie, maltster. Uri Burt started a small brewery in a dwelling-house at the corner of Colonie and Montgomery streets, having a capacity of about twenty barrels.

Of the old breweries now in use, the Albany Brewing Company is one. It was founded in 1797 by James Boyd, and to this day the Boyd family retain an interest in it. The original building was 24 by 30 feet. Its buildings now cover the block bounded by Arch, Green, South Ferry and Franklin streets, and are of brick, from two to eight stories high, with fine cellars, their capacity being 150,000 barrels of ale and porter annually. Two hundred thousand bushels of malt also are made yearly, and 125 workmen find employment. The Albany Brewing Company is the successor of Coolidge, Pratt & Co. The officers for 1884 were John S. Boyd, President; James H. Pratt, Secretary and Treasurer; J. M. Knapp, Member of the Executive Committee. John S. Boyd is a grandson of the founder of the establishment. Their products are shipped through the New England States and to New York City, in which they have a depot on West street. G. W. Robinson is Brewer of this Company, and T. C Rowe, Superintendent.

 

 

The Taylor Brewery was started October 12, 1822. Mr. John Taylor, its founder, erected the present building on South Broadway in 1851 and 1852. Upon the death of Mr. Taylor in 1863, the firm name was changed to John Taylor's Sons. The

 Messrs. Taylor who now conduct the business are not relatives of the founder. Their product is shipped mostly through New England and New York.

 

 

George I. and Theodore M. Amsdell Brothers are brewers of ale and porter. Their father at one time was engaged as a brewer at the Taylor brewery. He -afterwards started a little brewery in the country. The present institution began in 1850, and has increased until the area occupied by them is 354 by 150 feet, on which are six large brick buildings, five and six stories in hight. They employ 150 men and turn out 80, coo barrels of ale and 160,000 bushels of malt annually. W. T. Amsdell is Superintendent of this brewery, G. A. Hargrave is Brewer.

What is now the Fort Orange Brewing Company, was established in 1839 by Mr Goewey. He was succeded by Mr. Kirk. Messrs. Kearney & McQuade; Wilson & Co.; Smythe & Walker, who remained until May, 1882, succeeded in turn, when the present Company was formed. Alexander Gregory, the President of the Company, is an experienced brewer.

The establishment of James K. Carroll and Duncan McDonald, at 900 to 912 Broadway, is two stories, 50 x 120 feet, with an annual capacity of 30,000 barrels. They manufacture India Pale Ale XXX, Amber XX, Cream Ales, Pale XXX, Amber XX, Stock Ales and Porter.

Besides the above breweries are those of T. D. Coleman & Brothers, at 132 to 154 Chestnut street, and Granger's brewery, corner of Church and Fourth avenue, of which George F. Granger is proprietor. Ale is the only malt liquor brewed at these two establishments.

Lager Beer.

The manufacture of Lager Beer in this country is comparatively of recent date. In Albany the Beverwyck Brewery on North Ferry street is the largest. This was started forty years ago by James Quinn, who brewed ale on the same street. In 1866, Terence J. Quinn and Michael N. Nolan formed a partnership, which continued until 1878, the year of Mr. Quinn's death; since then the business has been conducted by Mr. Nolan, the firm name remaining unchanged. The buildings on North Ferry street are first-class. The cost of the Beverwyck Brewery was $350,000, and it is now manufacturing 60,000 barrels of beer and over 50,000 barrels of ale annually. Mr. Nolan is President and Treasurer; Augustus Kampfer, Secretary; M. Schrodt, General Manager; W. Hoffman, Superintendent; and Alexander Hargrave, Brewer.

The Cataract Brewery was established in 1857, between Park avenue, South Swan street and Myrtle avenue, by Frederick Hinckel and A. Schimerer; the former conducting the business until his death, in 1882. His successors are his brother, A. C. Hinckel, who is Business Manager, and his sons, Frederick and Charles A., the latter being Treasurer. About 75 workmen are employed, and the annual output is 35,000 barrels.

The following statement shows the number of barrels of ale and lager beer manufactured in Albany for the years ending April 30, 1883, and

April 30, 1884:  

Ale.

1883 236,491 barrels.       1884 263,459 "      Increase, 26,968 barrels.

Lager Beer.

1883 95,743 barrels.  1884 94,475 "   Decrease, 1,268 barrels.

MALTSTERS.

The senior member of the firm of John G. White & Sons, maltsters, 125 Hudson avenue, has been engaged in this business for over 60 years, as in 1823, he, with his brother William, first began the industry in this city. The business has enlarged until they have plants in New York, Philadelphia, and in Bath, opposite Albany. Their malt-house here is seven stories in hight, brick, 150 by 70 feet, with an L 30 by 50 feet, and an annual capacity of 450,000 bushels. The malthouse in New York is five stories, 200 by 80 feet, capacity 350,000 bushels; and at Philadelphia is six stories, 160 by 60 feet, with a capacity of 100,000 bushels. The business done by them is one of the largest in this country, and their trade extends throughout New York, Pennsylvania and New England. The members of the firm are John G. White and his son, Andrew G. White. Matthew White, another son, is manager of the house located in New York, and Mr. William Little, of the one in Philadelphia.

A leading representative of the malting trade of Albany is the house of J. W. Tillinghast, which was founded in 1850 by the late John Tweddle, the business coming into the possession of the present proprietor in 1870. Two plants are operated by Mr. Tillinghast, one located at No 105 Montgomery street, and the other on the corner of State and Lark streets. The former is a five-story structure, 195 by ico feet in dimensions, the latter is three stories high and covers an area of 74 by 140 feet, the two having an aggregate capacity for the production of about 300,000 bushels of malt annually. The equipment of these malthouses embraces all the latest improved machinery and appliances known to the trade, operated by steam, employment being furnished to about thirty skilled workmen.

Thomas McCredie, maltster, 34 Clinton avenue, began his business in barley malting in 1847. His productions have grown from a few hundred bushels annually, to 250,000 bushels, the present output. His four establishments are as follows: first, on Canal, Orange and Hawk street, size 200 by 50 feet, six stories, brick; second, on Clinton avenue, 50 x 200 feet, three stories; third, on Central avenue, Robin and Bradford streets, two stories, 65 x 100 feet; and the last, on North Pearl street, three stories, 50 x 140 feet. Twenty-five workmen are employed.

The house of Messrs. Story Brothers was founded in 1868. The present proprietors are J. T., William and R. R. Story. The firm has two malt-houses, one on Broadway and Cherry street, which is four-stories high, 140 x 70 feet, with a twostory addition, 35 x 35 feet; the other on Broadway and Plum street, which is two-stories high, l37 x 45 feet- The storage warehouse is four stories, 137 x 35 feet in dimensions. The annual product is 175,000 bushels. Fifteen workmen are employed.

William Kirk, son of Andrew Kirk, one of the earlier maltsters in Albany, is the proprietor of a malt-house, 3 Kirk place