RICKS BOTTLE ROOM.COM

~ ALWAYS IN PURSUIT OF GREAT GLASS ~ © 2007 ~

BOTTLE OF THE MONTH


{I'M CHANGING TO A ONCE A MONTH SCHEDULE & WILL ALSO BE RE POSTING THE MANY ARCHIVED ONES}

I STARTED BOTTLE OF THE WEEK YEARS AGO TO GIVE PEOPLE A CHANCE TO SHARE A FAVORITE BOTTLE AND ALLOW OTHERS TO FIND OUT ABOUT THE HISTORY OF THE BOTTLE & COMPANY AS WELL AS RARITY. THERE HAVE BEEN SOME REALLY GREAT ONES, ALL OF WHICH I LEAVE POSTED HERE OR ON THE BOTW ARCHIVES PAGE, SO TAKE A MINUTE AND LOOK DOWN THROUGH THEM LOTS OF HISTORY....SEND ME YOUR FAVORITE TO SHARE.  IT'S NOT A CONTEST, JUST A CHANCE TO SHARE INFORMATION AND SHOW OFF YOUR STUFF. SO SEND ME A PICTURE AND ANY INFORMATION YOU MAY HAVE TO, RICKSBOTTLEROOM@GMAIL..COM  I ALSO SEE WHAT ADDITIONAL INFORMATION I CAN FIND AND I USUALLY CAN FIND SOME TO ADD FROM MY RESEARCH FILES. I REALLY LIKE RESEARCHING FINDS AND AT PRESENT I AM RECEIVE MANY QUESTIONS A MONTH...I TRY AND ANSWER THEM ALL AND USUALLY WITHIN 48 HRS. AND....IT'S FREE!!, SO PLEASE, ASK AWAY.


BOTTLES PICTURED ARE FROM COLLECTIONS OF MICHEAL GEORGE,FERDINAND MEYERS,REGGIE LYNCH & RICK CIRALLI COLLECTIONS AS NOTED.

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BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ ARCHDEACON MINERAL WATER 1850, PATERSON N.J.
 
Bottle of the week comes from the collection of Jim Eifler from Paterson N.J., ARCHDEACON MINERAL WATER PATERSON N.J. 1850. Jim has a literal museum of not only Paterson bottles,go-withs and stoneware but a vast knowledge of history and documentation on the history of everything Paterson. This is a rare bottle and very sought after by collectors, Jim was floored when a fellow collector gave it to him as a gift !!!! Bottle people are awesome.
 
 
 
 
William Archdeacon started bottling and selling soda & mineral water in 1847 in the city of Paterson, he also leased and operated the Odd Fellows Hall on Main St. starting in 1852. On the first floor was an Oyster & Dining Saloon, part of the first floor was an area for sales of his 'Celebrated Sarsaparilla Soda Water' and his 'Carbonated Ginger Soda'. On the second floor was the 'Ladies and Gentleman's Ice Cream and Dining Saloon' where he sold Philadelphia Porters and Ales, Newark NJ Champagne Ciders and many other wines and liquors from around the world.

William Archdeacon was an active member of the Montgomery Riflemen, an Irish Military group that was basically ceremonial and among many similar groups in the area in the 1850's as a lieutenant. His family members Peter and John Archdeacon were also heavily involved in operating similar establishments in Paterson at this time, Peter owned and operated the Museum Hotel on the northeast corner of Main and Smith Streets, Paterson, and the museum was opened to the public on December 21, 1833.  It was a structure of two stories.  On the street level was the hotel, while the upper floor housed the museum and theater.  A second floor balcony faced Main Street, which served as a rostrum for public speeches on many occasions before the days of the old Opera House.

The hotel was one of the best in town, and as was the custom in those days, the county Board of Freeholders usually held their meetings in various hotels and taverns through the county.  Their meetings in the Museum Hotel were not unusual in 1837 and 1838.

John Archdeacon operated the Cottage on the Cliff Hotel and Saloon which was directly across from the Passaic River falls, a spot that was used regularly by General George Washington for 'encampments for the time times that tried men's souls'...
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ BURR & WATERS, BUFFALO N.Y.

BURR & WATERS PANELED BEAUTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF WAYNE KROTT ~ PHOTO CREDIT,  JEFFREY HUNTER, A RARE MINERAL WATER FROM BUFFALO NY & GREAT PICTURE AS WELL

 

Mineral Springs Road is located in the southeastern edge of the City of Buffalo, extending into West Seneca.  The street runs between Seneca Street in Buffalo to Union Road in West Seneca.  The Mineral Springs (also known as the Sulphur Springs) were located in a grove of trees near the corner of Mineral Springs and Harlem Road.
The springs were known to the Seneca as Dyos-hih, ?the sulphur spring?.   On August 10, 1830, a notice was posted in local newspapers advertising that ?a medicinal spring possessing the properties of the Spring at Avon has been discovered on the Indian Reservation about three miles from Buffalo Village near the junction of the Hydraulic Canal and Buffalo Creek?.  The waters in this area were reputed to have healing powers for the sick.

In 1848, a brochure was published by A.F. Lee to advertise the Springs.   Mineral springs
were known as an ancient cure, going back to at least the time of the Greeks.  The waters didn?t have the medicinal properties when they were bottled, so people would drink them directly at the spring.  The sulphur springs contain sulphuretted hydrogen.


Other famous sulphur springs include Aix-La-Chapelle which was built during the time of Charlemagne, the Sulphur Springs of Virginia, the waters of Harrowgate in Yorkshire, England, and the Avon Springs in Avon, New York.  The springs at Buffalo was believed to be superior to all of the other springs.   A chemical analysis of the springs was done by Dr. Chilton of New York City in 1844.  The water was found to contain sodium chloride, calcium chloride, magnesium chloride, lime carbonate, soda carbonate, magnesia sulphate, and lime sulphate.  The springs contained 12 times more sulphuretted hydrogen than most springs and double that of the spring at Avon.

Different springs were cured different diseases.  The spring at Buffalo was good for the following diseases: obstinate cutaneous diseases, rheumatic and gouty affections, cases of neuralgia, indolent ulcers, dyspepsia, early stages of tuberculosis and consumption, and was also ?useful in some complaints peculiar to females?.

The spring was endorsed by several doctors in Buffalo.  The following doctors wrote letters of support of the medicinal properties of the spring:  J. Trowbridge, Bryant Buruell, A.S. Sprague, M. Bristol, Austin Flint, Frank Hamilton, Erastus Wallis, J. Barnes, Jno. S. Trowbridge, and Chas. W. Harvey.

The springs were owned by Messieurs Burr and Waters of Buffalo.  A three-story frame structure with a large porch was built as a bathing house.  The springs were a resort for Buffalonians for a short while, but the roads were well not well maintained and the springs were eventually abandoned. (Angela Keppel)

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ PHELPS ARCANUM, WORCESTER MASS.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK, FROM THE COLLECTION OF RICK CIRALLI, WHAT A FANTASTIC LOOKING PIECE THIS IS, LOVE THE OVERALL LOOK ,FORM AND COLOR. I FOUND SOME HISTORY ON MR. PHELPS AND ALSO SOME INFORMATION AND PICTURE OF HIS ELABORATE ADVERTISEMENT. (SEE BELOW) THANKS RICK, GREAT BOTTLE.

 

DR. AZOR G. PHELPS was born in Shrewsbury and practiced there until his death in 1832. Little is known about him except that he held a patent for a medicine called "Phelps' Arcanum," and that he possessed 200 bottles of the substance (valued at only $20) when he died. His total estate was worth $2,479.58.


No. 4 Butman Row, " In September, 1840, Mr. J. W. Hartwell occupied it, and in November of the same year, B. F. Mann, both of whom were in the dry goods business. Two or three years later, Mr. J. H. Everett, a rather eccentric individual, was occupying the same store and in the same business.

J. P. Kettell was one of the original occupants of the "Row," having removed there from "Goddard's Row," which was north of Thomas street. He was in the hat, cap and fur business, and only remained a few years in the block, when he removed farther down street, which in that day was considered a more eligible position for business. In June, 1841, after the fire in the block opposite, this store was for a short time occupied by J. B. Tyler & Co., then by J. H. Rickett in the dry goods business.* The latter was succeeded by Meltiah B. Green, under the firm name of James Green & Co., who for many years dealt out drugs and patent medicines, and compounded prescriptions for the ailing. The newspapers of that day show that patent medicines for the cure of all diseases that flesh is heir to, were about as plenty then as now, a page and a half of the Spy being taken up with advertisements extolling the healing powers of "Indian Balsam," "Balm of Life," Soothing Syrups, Matchless Sanative, Jayne's Expectorant, Compound Tomato Pills, and Phelps's Arcanum. Some of my hearers will probably remember the elaborate lithograph, issued to call attention to the merits of the last named preparation. This picture, with its rows of bottles supporting a dome or canopy, over which floated a winged figure with a scroll bearing the words : "Phelps's Arcanum." and about the base boxes of the medicine directed to all parts of the world, derives special interest from the fact that it was designed and drawn on the stone by George L. Brown, before spoken of, and now an eminent American landscape artist

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ CELEBRATED CRAIG HEALING SPRING, CRAIG COUNTY VA.
 
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF TRAVIS LAYMAN, A FAVORITE OF HIS AND I SEE WHY BEING LOCAL TO HIM AND HAVING A GREAT HISTORY. THE PROPERTY TODAY IS A CHURCH OWNED ESTABLISHMENT AND HAS BEEN ADDED TO THE HISTORICAL PLACES REGISTER. GREAT BOTTLE,THANKS FOR SHARING TRAVIS.
 
 
 
The Craig Healing Springs resort prospered during the first fifty years of this century, although it never achieved the notoriety of the larger Virginia springs such as the White
Sulphur or the Hot. While a hotel (now demolished) was built at the springs ca. 1885, the Property was not commercially developed on a large scale u n t i l 1909. Simple frame construction and a homogenous architectural style give Craig Healing Springs more the appearance of a summer camp than of the successful resort that it was once. The present complex of twenty-three buildings continues t o enjoy a remote, lush location in the Allegheny Mountains of Craig County.
 
 The presence of "yellow spring waters" on this property was noted as early as 1796 in a deed from Governor James Monroe to:William and Joseph Eakins. The remote and almost inaccessible location of the springs during the 19th century, however, prevented its development as a health resort  after the manner of,more. famous Virginia spas such as the Hot Springs and the White Sulphur Springs. The first suggestion that plans for resort development were contemplated for the area is found in a deed dated 1880 in which reference i.s made to "this valuable property," an indication of the potential commercial significance of the site .Five years later the Yellow Springs tract was purchased by eleven men, who probably were responsible for the ca. 1885 construction of the now-demolished Craig Hotel, the first hotel structure a t the spring?. One of the eleven partners, Elartin Hoffman, bought out the other ten and called the property " All Healing Springs," a name that spoke to the popular late 19th-century belief i n the healing properties of various mineral waters. The promise of profitability on mining and the extension of rail lines to nearby Eiew Castle brought people and commercial investment to the vicinity of the springs by the last decade of the 19th century. With the completion of a spur l i n e of the Chesapeake and Ohio railroad (begun in 1897), passengers could travel by rail to within twelve miles of the resort. The example of railroad magnate Melville Ingalls, who invested one million dollars in the Homestead Hotel at Hot Springs in 1890, no doubt also encouraged investors to consider development of the southwestern Virginia resort.
 
LABEL FROM HALF GALLON SIZE >>>
 
A 1907 booklet extolling the advantages of Craig County specifically mentioned the area's mineral springs and pleasure and health resorts and thus gave Craig Healing Springs its first important publicity. Following several changes of ownership involving men who were active in acquiring mining rights in the county, the Craig Healing Springs Company purchased the property in 1909 and initiated an era of expansion. The land it bought included the old Craig Hotel and two school buildings, one of which now serves as part of the conference center dining room. A new, three-story hotel, built in 1912, formed the nucleus of the complex. Under the management of N. S. Buck, a row of cottages was added to the resort before World War I, while G. W. Layman, owner of the mineral springs portion of the property,remodeled the early school buildings and probably built some of the stone buildings and the bowling alley. By 1920 Craig Healing Springs had largely' assumed its present form.
 
 

 
 
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~  KIDERLEN ROTTERDAM CELEBRATED OLD GIN

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF BILL STEELE, A RECENT ADDITION TO HIS COLLECTION AND ALSO CONSIDERED TO BE VERY SCARCE IN COLOR AND FORM. WHAT A GREAT BOTTLE,THANKS FOR SHARING BILL. I FOUND SOME INFORMATION ON IT AND POSTED IT HERE.

 

The Netherlands Distilleries at Delft, Holland.

It is with pleasure that we call attention to the very important industrial establishment in Holland whose excellent article, the "Kiderlen Gin," some of our readers already know. We mean the Netherlands Distilleries, which has its chief works at Delft with branches in Holland and Belgium, which may be called factories of importance in themselves.

The Netherlands Distilleries are a combination of four large distillery works:

1. Nederlandsche Gist- & Spiritusfabriek, Delft. (Holland.)

2. Nederlandsche Gist- & Spiritusfabriek, late Jules Verstraeten & Co., Bruges, (Belgium).

3. Netherland Steam Distillery, late E. Kiderlen, Rotterdam. (Holland.)

[graphic]

View of one of the Netherlands Distilleries.

4. Delftsche Distilleerdery, late van Meerten & Zoonen, Delft (Holland), besides a mattery at Schiedam (Holland).

The Nederlandsche Gist- & Spiritusfabriek, established in 1869, started with only a very small capital. Now, about thirty-five years later, its capital in ordinary shares amounts to fSOO.OOO, debentures £150,000. It employs 1,000 people, and it has gradually swallowed up the three other gin distilleries mentioned above and united the whole under the name of The Netherlands Distilleries.

The managing directors are J. C. van Marken and F. G. Waller; first-named is also the founder of the establishment.

only confined itself to put on the market articles, of irreproachable quality and to assure to the shareholders the possession of a flourishing business, but has also called into existence a number of social institutions to make life worth living to the numerous persons engaged.

The salaries and wages paid by the Netherlands Distilleries to the office people and workmen are amongst the highest in this branch of industry.

A neat park was laid out in the vicinity of the Delft works, where a great number of comfortable workmen's dwellings erected after a cottage system, have been built, besides shops, recreation grounds, club buildings, etc. Pension and sick funds are not wanting, so that this establishment is, rightly, highly valued as well from a social economical as from a commercial economical and technical point of view in Holland and abroad.

Messrs. A. A. Solomon, Jr., & Co., 37 Beaver street, New York, are the very able agents of this firm.

From the Monticello Distilling Co. 

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ HENRY FLACH & SONS, PHILADA.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF DAVE DEMSEY AND IS A RECENT ADDITION TO HIS COLLECTION. NOT A COMMON BLOB TOP AND ONE THAT I DO NOT OWN MYSELF, THIS ONE HAS GREAT GRAPHICS AND IS VERY SOUGHT AFTER. THANKS FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE IT DAVE,GREAT FIND.

 

 Henry Flach & Sons beer bottles, showing the logo of an eagle sitting on a keg labeled ?HF&Sons?. In one claw the eagle grasps an olive branch. A shield rests at an angle behind the olive branch. On either side of the eagle the words ?TRADE? and ?MARK? run vertically. Along the base of the bottle it says ?PHILADA?.

 

HENRY FLACH

23 November, 1835 - 13 November 1896

 

Henry was born on November 23, 1835 in house #5 in Neuenhain, a small village located southwest of Kassle in northern Hesse, Germany. He was baptised in the protestant church on January 1, 1836 and was confirmed in 1849. His godfather was Henrich Ehl who was a teacher in Bischhausen.

His father Johannes was an innkeeper, musician, brewer, farmer, and member of the village council. Johannes died at age 44 in 1847 on Henry's 12th birthday. Henry's grandfather was Conrad Flach, a blacksmith from the village of Zimmersrode which is about one mile west of Neuenhain. Conrad had died 15 years before Henry's birth. Conrad was the son of Nicholaus Flach.

On May 6, 1852, at the age of 16, Henry Flach arrived at the port of Philadelphia, Pa. He came from Bremen, Germany aboard the ship Louise Marie. The passenger list had his name spelled Heinrich Floch and his occupation was listed as a farmer. Henry became a citizen on September 28, 1860 and his home in Germany was listed as the "Elector of Hesse-Cassel." He married Rosalie Hartung, who arrived in the United States from Saxony, Germany in 1855.

In the Philadelphia census of 1860, Henry is listed as Henry HOGG, living in the 1st ward of Philadelphia on June 11, 1860. His occupation is listed as a wood turner. He hailed from Hesse Cassle and wife Rosalie shows as being from Saxony. Daughter Anna (age 5) shows born in Pa. Son Henry was age 3 and also born in Pa. Son George was 1 and reported born in Delaware.

In November 1869 Henry petitioned for membership into the William B. Schneider lodge as a mason and on December 21, 1869 Henry was initiated as a 1st degree member. On January 2, 1870 he was a 2nd degree. He became a Master on February 15, 1870 and passed to the Chair December 12, 1871.

Henry petitioned for membership to the St. John Commandery #4 on May 22, 1885. He was 34 years old and the 204th member. His occupation was listed as a Hotel Keeper.

His obituary in the Public Ledger on November 14, 1896 reads as follows:

Henry Flach, a well known brewer of this city, died yesterday at his residence, 1500 N. 52nd St.. Mr. Flach had been complaining of illness for a year past and three months ago underwent an operation, from the effects of which he, for a while, appeared to have nearly recovered.

Mr. Flach was born in Neuenhien, Hessen, Germany, November 23, 1835. He came to this country in 1851 and since resided in Philadelphia. In 1860, he opened a saloon, and in 1873 entered into a partnership and bought the brewery of Leimbach and Mohr, 32nd and Master Sts., the business being conducted under the name of Henzler and Flach until the death of Mr. Henzler in 1885. A year later Mr. Flach took his sons into partnership, the firms name being changed to Flach and Sons. He is survived by a widow, three sons and four daughters.

Mr. Flach was a Mason and was a member of the William B, Schneider Lodge, No. 419; Oriental Chapter, No 183; St. Johns Commandery No. 4; and among other organizations to which he belonged are the 34th Ward Republican Club, Philadelphia Lodge, No. 30 D. O. H.; Belmont Lodge, No.19, K of P; Philadelphia Rifle Club, the Bavarian Society, the Gambrinus Society and the Lager Beer Brewery Association.

Henry is buried at Northwood Cemetery in Philadelphia, located off Broad Street a short distance from Temple University. His burial plot is shared with Philip Spaeter, who, according to Edna Godshall, was Henry's best friend and the reason Henry named his last son Philip
 
 
 AMERICAN BREWING CO. BENNETT, PENNSYLVANIA 

Trade Names for the brewery at 1400 North 31st & Master Streets, Philadelphia, PA: 
Morris Perot (NE corner 31st & Master) 1878-1880  Henzler & Flach 1880-1885   Henry Flach, Eagle Brewery 1885-1888
Henry Flach & Sons 1888-1897  American Brewing Co, 1897-1920  Brewery operations shut down by National Prohibition in 1920
Status of the building is unknown.

American Brewing Co., Wm. C. Kammerer, Secretary and Treasurer, Thirty-first and Master.  1916

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ DR. STANLEY'S  SOUTH AMERICAN INDIAN BITTERS

This weeks bottle of the week and the accompanying information is from Frank on his site Bottle Pickers which i will be running as site of the month next month.  DR STANLEY'S SOUTH AMERICAN INDIAN BITTERS, great bottles and info. Thanks for allowing me to share it.

BOTTLE PICKERS

 DR. ALFRED G. STANLEY : SOUTH AMERICAN INDIAN BITTERS

Alfred G. Stanley was born January 24 1845 in Salisbury England. There he would attend the College of Salisbury. He would learn the drug business with Roberts & Son, who he spent four and one half years with. Then he went to London and worked for the well known firm Peter Boully, retail druggists of London. Alfred would relocate to America in 1869 and for a short time he live in New York. He would move to Philadelphia were he would work for Ellis Sons & Co. In 1871 he would relocate again to the corner of Main St. and Market St. in Lyken’s P.A. Here he would open up his own first class drug business and general supply of all kinds of drugs. He acquired a reputation of being one of the most reliable druggist in the county along with the surrounding counties. Alfred was married in 1873 to Mary Spoeri in Lyken’s. They would have seven children, his son Frederick would became a druggist and work with him. The American Journal of Pharmacy lists Alfred in the graduating class of 1880 from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy.

Dr. Alfred Stanley would produce his Dr. Stanley’s South American Indian Bitters from 1878 to 1906. He was also the President of the Gratz Agricultural Society for sixteen years and President of Lyken’s Agricultural Society for three years. He was a collector of rare stuffed birds from various parts of the world which he had in his possession.
 
 
Bottles above are from Frank & Frank Jr's collection.
 
 
1902 Greater Harrisburg Area Polk Directory ad.
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ HILKE'S SALOON & LUNCH ROOM,TROY N.Y.



































BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS A RECENT ADDITION TO RICHARD PEALS COLLECTION AND A RARE FIND IN THAT CANVAS POUCHES EVEN INSIDE ARE USUALLY EATEN BY RODENTS ECT. THE BOTTLE (ALTHOUGH NOT SAME NAME) I AM BETTING WAS SOLD AS YOU SEE IT WAY BACK IN THE LATE 1800S FROM HILKE'S SALOON AND LUNCH ROOM. FULL PERFECT LABEL,EMBOSSED AND THE POUCH....DOESN'T GET MUCH BETTER,THANKS RICHARD FOR SHARING.
 
 
 
 
 
THE TROY TIMES, 1873
 
The legal force and the necessity at present rates of premium, of limiting accidents insured against by an unregistered ticket to " accidents happening to the public conveyance in which the insured is at the time a passenger," is sorrowfully illustrated in the death of John Newton Howe, of this city, of which the Troy Times, of the 26th day., gives this account:

They arrived at the depot at an early hour, and after Howe had purchased a $3,000 accident life insurance policy, paying 20 cents for the same, the friends entered Hilke's saloon, near the depot, for the purpose of having a few parting drinks. They repeatedly looked out of the saloon to see if the train was ready to start, but did not make a motion to leave until it had commenced to move. Then the rush was made for the train, both Sheehan and Howe attempting to get on the second coach. Sheehan tailed, and then jumped on the rear car. Howe clung to the iron bars on the platform, but was unable to pull himself up before he came in contact with one of the pillars supporting the south end of the depot. The force with which he struck the pillar knocked him off the train. He fell beside the track, but was so bewildered that instead of rolling away from tne train he rolled directly under it.
 
 
 
 
 
  Letter to the editor
 
To the Editor? of The Metal Worker.? Last week_ the stove agents of Troy received the following printed notice, which explains itself :
Dear Sir: You are requested to attend a meeting of the Troy stove agents, to be held at Hilkes? saloon, corner of Broadway and Sixth street, Saturday, January 29,1881 at 8 o'clock, p. m., to take action in reference to a letter published in The Metal Worker, January 22,1881 over the signature of "Direct Draft
It was understood that the self-appointed committee intended to have had the meeting held at the Troy House parlors, but, learning that it was a meeting of stove agents, the proprietors withdrew their permission, on the grounds that they could not afford to have their guests disturbed. The meeting was, therefore, called at Hilkes? saloon, the proprietor of which very kindly gave him the use of his largest room, and arranged it so they would not be disturbed.
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ ATWOOD'S VEGETABLE JAUNDICE BITTERS
THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF ROBERT COHEN A RECENT ADDITION AND ONE NOT SEEN OFTEN. GREAT BOTTLE ROBERT, I HAVE ADDED SOME INFORMATION INCLUDING THE COURT CASE MENTIONED IN THE FIRST WRITE UP. THANKS ROBERT FOR SHARING YOUR NEW ADDITION,GREAT BOTTLE.
 
 
 
 
Moses Atwood, The Man and the Medicine
 
by Calvin Bandstra  published by the New Sharon Area Historical Society v14, #1 (Spring 2006)

For many residents in New Sharons northeast side [Iowa], a check of their real estate records will reveal that their property is located in "Atwoods Addition to Sharon." The phone book shows that there are no Atwoods living in New Sharon right now, and it is not a real familiar name in New Sharons history. So where did "Atwoods Addition" come from?

The Answer: Moses Atwood, who is typically regarded as the towns first doctor. His stay in New Sharon was somewhat short, but he made a lasting impression both locally in the town plat and nationally with the development of a product that became the centerpiece of a U.S. Supreme
Court decision.

Moses Atwood was born April 24, 1810, in Thornton Cove, Grafton County, New Hampshire, the son of Levi Atwood and Elizabeth Francis. His father was a Baptist minister who eventually settled in Nashua, New Hampshire. Very little is known about the early years of Moses, except at the young age of 16 he began studying medicine with Symmes Sawyer, a doctor who was practicing medicine in Woodstock, New Hampshire. This apprenticeship style of medical training was very common in that era, before the advent of medical schools and licenses to practice medicine. Around 1834 he married
his first cousin, Mary Atwood, and the first of their 8 children was born in Woodstock. In 1840, Moses moved with his wife and family to Georgetown,Essex County, Massachusetts.

It was here in Georgetown that the Moses Atwood name became most famous. At the young age of 30, he entered the field of Patent Medicine, which is essentially the production of private medicine. The product he produced was popularly known as Atwoods Bitters, with the full name of Atwoods Vegetable Physical Jaundice Bitters, as well as some other variations. "Bitters" is an alcoholic, herbal preparation that can have a bitter flavor. In some cases "bitters" was really alcohol disguised as medicine, and because of the herbs involved, it could potentially avoid taxes that were placed on alcohol products. Because of this, hundreds of brands of bitters were produced. Also, due to the increasing pressure of the temperance movement, a person could respectably drink bitters while still obtaining the effects of alcohol. Since he was working with herbs, Moses gave himself the rather lofty title of "Botanist"at the time of the 1850 Federal Census. Living in the same house with Moses was the family of George Bingham, a New Hampshire native who also had the profession of Botanist. Later court papers would reveal that the Binghams and Atwoods were in partnership with each other, and one wonders if they may have known each other in their home state of New Hampshire.

By 1850, life in Georgetown seemed to be going well for Moses. He had 7 living children, with one son, Charles, having died at a young age. Another son, named Moses Frances (after his mothers maiden name) Atwood, would eventually follow the elder Moses in the medicine manufacturing industry.The Atwood Bitters product proved to be very popular, and the senior Moses created several alliances to distribute the product over a broader market. These alliances later proved to be quite confusing, resulting in more than one court action. The value of his Massachusetts real estate was $8,487, which was a sizeable amount in 1850 dollars.
In 1855, Moses Atwood and his family made the big decision to move west to Iowa. Why they did this is unclear, as it appeared his Bitters business was booming. Later court testimony indicated that Moses received between four and five thousand dollars for selling out of his business in 1855, with the purchaser also assuming some debts he had due. So perhaps the intense competition in the bitters industry in conjunction with some debt pressure prompted Moses to "take the money and run." As his life history shows, Moses by nature was not afraid of new ventures, so maybe he viewed the move to Iowa as a challenge that would produce more opportunities. In any event,Moses first settled in Jackson Township, Poweshiek County. While the area was still sparsely populated, the town of Montezuma in this township had been founded a few years earlier in 1848, providing a trading center for the incoming settlers. Iowa had a State census in 1856, with Moses listing his occupation as a farmer and showing 5 children living with him and his wife Mary17-year old Moses F., 12-year old Mary, 10-year old Martha, 8-year old Stephen, and 6-year old Harriet. It is believed that an older daughter Hannah stayed in Massachusetts. But another older daughter, Betsey Frances, settled right next to her parents in Jackson Township with her husband, William H. Lewis. The 1856 census shows they had an Iowa-born son not even a year old named Charles H., likely named after Betseys brother that had died at a young age. What happened to this Lewis family is a mystery by the 1860 census, the 4-year old Charles H. Lewis is living with his grandparents, Moses and Mary Atwood. There is no record of his parents in the area, and
following the 1860 census there is no further record of Charles. Whether the Lewis family completely died out, or moved away, is not known.Moses and Mary Atwoods stay in Poweshiek County was short-lived. He was
still there at the 1860 Census, but had the interesting occupation of
"peddler." Moses owned no real estate, so one can assume his livelihood was made by going from cabin to cabin on the prairie to sell his Atwoods Bitters to the settlers who had very limited access to medical resources.His older son Moses F. had gone back to Massachusetts by this time to work with a former partner of his fathers in the bitters business, L. H.Bateman. He reported his occupation as "M.D." on the 1860 Massachusetts census, and that description for this 21-year old was probably puffery at best and deceptive at worst. While out East, Moses F. made some arrangements to sell off the rights to the Atwood Bitters product, with this action eventually resulting in legal issues as both he and his father sold off the same rights to the product.
Moses F. Atwoods trip out East resulted in a marriage in 1861 to Aroline Hoyt Rogers. Shortly after that, he enlisted in the Civil War in a Massachusetts regiment, and then after being discharged in a few months, he moved to New Sharon with his family and enlisted again out of Mahaska County. Moses F. had a distinguished Civil War record, and eventually
received a small pension for being wounded during the service. After the Civil War he spent some time in Mexico to aid the Mexican people in their fight for independence.

While the Civil War was at its height, Moses Atwood moved from Poweshiek County to the New Sharon area. His first known purchase of real estate was in 1863, and consisted of 10 acres located on the northeast side of the existing town plat of Sharon. The deed came from John Culbertson and Morgan Reno, the Iowa City speculators who had purchased a large tract of land from the government. Interestingly, the deed was placed in Mary Atwoods name, who in turn placed the property in her daughter-in-laws name, Aroline H. Atwood, a few months later. Sole female ownership of land was
rare in those days, but it is possible this was done because the senior Moses Atwood was traveling, and Moses F. Atwood was fighting in the Civil War, with his return to New Sharon far from certain. In any event, upon Moses F. Atwoods return to Iowa in 1866, the property was put back into his fathers name. Also in 1863, Moses and Mary bought 40 acres from Richard Snell that was adjacent to the 10 acres previously mentioned; the cost of this purchase was $200. Moses had other real estate transactions as well. Most significant was a farm just east of New Sharon, now owned by Dale and Davonna Fynaardt. This was purchased in the mid 1860s, but it is not known if Moses ever lived there. It is probable that son Stephen farmed this ground, as the 1870 census lists the occupation of this 22-year old son as a farmer. It is believed that the Atwoods lived in a spacious house on their New Sharon property at the corner of High and Elm streets, where the homes of Lois Allgood and Max Speas are now located.

Moses continued to pursue the Bitters business in New Sharon, as the 1870 Census of Prairie Township gives him a very interesting occupation: "manufacturer of medicines." However, it appears that by this time Moses had changed his focus to real estate development. It must be remembered that New Sharon was just getting ready for incredible growth, as the railroad project was in progress and was slated to be finalized in 1871. That same year, New Sharon would be formally incorporated as a city. Growth and optimism were in the airNew Sharons population more than doubled to around 900 residents between 1870 and 1876. All these people needed goods, services, and places to live, which prompted Moses to file the plat for
"Atwoods Addition to Sharon" in the spring of 1871. Moses immediately began an advertising campaign to sell these lots. It is not known whether Moses built any "spec houses" himself on these lots to encourage their sale. This could easily have happened, as his son, Moses F. Atwood, had the occupation of carpenter in the 1870 census (note that his occupation changed from an M. D. in 1860 to a carpenter in 1870!).

The financial situation of the Atwoods is somewhat hard to figure out. In his 1871 advertisement in the Oskaloosa Herald, he states "I am greatly in need of money, and will sell them [the lots] at two-thirds of their value, or less, on that account." It is hard to know whether or not that was really the case, or if he was falling back on the "gimmickry" of the patent medicine business to encourage sales of the lots. His 1872 ad depicts a wholesale liquidation of all of his property. Whether or not Moses started out in a financial bind, he probably ended in one. Following an economic boom, there is often an economic bust. There was a national financial panic that culminated in 1873, and the ripple effect of that event did reach the prairies of Iowa. New Sharon began to lose population, which of course depressed the real estate market. Moses Atwood began to borrow money in 1875 to enhance his cash flow, and he mortgaged his property to secure his debts. From 1871 to 1878 Moses had sold off all of his real estate holdings, and by 1878 he had moved to Washington County, Kansas with his family and the family of his son, Moses F. Atwood.

In addition to his real estate and patent medicine, a few other events marked the life of Moses during his stay in the New Sharon area. One was his membership in the Methodist Church and his 12 years of dedicated service on the Board of Trustees there. Moses was acting in this capacity in 1868 when the Methodist Church took title to the property where the New Sharon Area Historical Society museum building is now located. While the construction of the Methodist Church in 1871 was likely a high point of Mosess stay in New Sharon, he endured two tragedies here as well. One was the loss of his granddaughter Elener (or Elma) Atwood, who died in 1870 at the age of three months. She was the daughter of Moses F. Atwood, and was a twin to her brother Edgar. The other was the loss of his unmarried son Stephen in 1874, at the age of 27 years old. Both are buried at Friends Cemetery in New Sharon.

Moses and Mary moved to Washington County, Kansas, and purchased 80 acres there. Moses F. and Aroline Atwood purchased 140 acres nearby. The 1880 census refers to Moses and Moses F. as farmers. It is not known whether or not they pursued the Bitters business in Kansas. However, the 96-year old Allen Atwood, who now lives in Montana, remembers visiting his grandparents Moses F. and Aroline Atwood in Kansas when he was a young boy living in Kansas City. He recalled playing in a shed on the property and discovering a stash of medicine-related items. Allen Atwood noted that a family story states that the Atwoods also sold a ladies snuff product, which was quite popular in its time. Mary Atwood died in 1881, with Moses Atwood remarrying a Lydia Knepper in 1884. She died in 1891, with Moses dying in 1892 at the age of 82.

So what should we think of Moses? Did he move to Iowa to stay ahead of creditors and disgruntled business partners? Or was he an adventurous individual always ready to relocate to new places to experience new opportunities? Or was he a speculator with some poor timing, getting on the bad side of a boom and bust cycle? In a Washington County, Kansas history book, an 1890 Kansas biographer begins his discourse on the life of Moses with "The Doctor, though a man of advanced years, is as thoroughly interested now as in his earlier life, in behalf of suffering humanity. The millions of people to whom his remedies have given relief from pain and a new lease of life, may well look upon him in the light of a public benefactor." But more importantly, the biographer ends his story on this note: "He is a devout Christian and has been more anxious to do good in his day and generation than to accumulate a large amount of this worlds goods." That sentence is certainly a respectable tribute that summarizes the life of Moses Atwood


 
 
 
 
 
 
US PATENT HEARING 1878

A, the original proprietor of the medicine and its trade-mark, in making assignment to the grantees, through whom immediately the complainants claim, reserved certain territory from the grant, no part of which thereafter vested in the complainants. The respondents, manufacturing in one of the excepted districts, derived title to the medicine and the mark from B, whose independent interest therein, distinct from that of A or his grantees, had been judicially declared in an action brought by the latter to restrain his alleged unlicensed use thereof 1 Hold, that the respondents are without liability.

Trade-marks are an entirety and are incapable of exclusive use at different places by more than one independent proprietor, for, in seeking redress, in order to establish an exclusive right to the mark, the party must show an exclusive right, to the commodity to which it is attached.

Rights to a trade-mark may be forfeited if the mark is deceptively used to designate a spurious article, and a party thus ectopic can convey no valid title in the mark to another.

Equity will not decree for an account of past.- gains and profits where there has been inches in bringing suit and long acquiescence in the adverse use of the mark by others.

Disregard of territorial limits allotted by license of proprietor, and misuse of the trade-mark, are a forfeiture of right and a defeat to any valid conveyance by the wrong-doors.

Voluntary relinquishment of the original mark of the proprietor for another devised by the grantees themselves is a forfeiture of right to the old mark no less than its misuse to designate a spurious article.

[Mons M. Buller and Chase. Beaten: at Holt for complainants; W. H. Glifford and Nathan Webb for defendants]

CLIFFORD, J. : Equity gives relief for the infringement of a trademark, upon the ground that one man is not allowed to offer his goods for sale representing the goods to be the manufacture of another in the same commodity. (Seixo vs. Prorczrude, Law Rep., 1 Chem, 195.) what degree of resemblance is necessary to constitute an infringement is incapable of exact definition, but the rule is that no trader can adopt a. trade-mark so resembling that of another as that ordinary purchasers, buying with ordinary caution, are likely to be misled. (McLean vs. Fleming, 6 Otto.) Two trade-marks are substantially the same in legal contemplation if the resemblance is such as to deceive ordinary purchasers, giving such attention to the same as such purchasers usually give, and to cause them to purchase the one manufacture supposing it to be the other.

Relief is claimed in this case upon the special grounds set forth in the bill of complaint. They are in substance and effect as follows:

1. That the corporation complainants for along time have been and now are the manufacturers and vendors of an article of medicine called and known as “Atwood’s Vegetable Physical J aundice Bitters,” taken internally for the cure of jaundice and other diseases; that during all the time they have been engaged in making and selling the article it‘ has been put up and sold in the some manner and with the same trade-marks, labels, and wrappers affixed thereto, in glass bottles with twelve panel-shaped sides, having on five of the sides the raised words and letters “Atwood’s Genuine Physical Jaundice Bitters, Georgetown, Mass,” blown in the glass on each bottle, each bottle containing about a pint of the medicine in liquid form, labeled with a. light yellow printed label, pasted on the outside, as fully set forth in the bill of complaint.

2. That the said medicine was first invented and put up for sale about twenty-five years ago by one Dr. Moses Atwood, formerly of Georgetown, Massachusetts, by whom, his assigns and successors, the same has been ever since made and sold by the same name, in the same manner, and with the same trade-marks and description.

3. That the complainants, long prior to the alleged infringement, became the lawful, sole, and exclusive owners of the formula or recipe for making said medicine, and of the -sole and exclusive right to use said name or designation therefor, together with all said trade-marks, labels, and good-will of the business of making and selling said medicine.


4. That the respondents, prior to the filing of the bill of complaint, at Portland, and at divers other places unknown to the complainants, have manufactured and sold and are still manufacturing and selling large quantities of medicine, of an inferior quality, in imitation of the article manufactured and sold by the complainants, and without their consent.

5. That during all that time the respondents have made, put up, and sold, and still make, put up, and sell, their said imitation and counterfeit article as and for the genuine article of the complainants, so put up, marked, and labeled, that it is very difficult to be distinguished from the complainants’ genuine article.

6. Based on these allegations, the complainants pray for an account, and for an injunction restraining the respondents from affixing or applying to any article of medicine manufactured, sold, shipped, or supplied by them, or to the bottles or packages in which the same is put up, the complainants’ trade-mark words, to wit, “Atwood’s Vegetable Physical Jaundice Bitters,” or either of said words, or any imitation thereof.

Service was made, and the respondents appeared and filed an answer, setting up several defenses to the following effect:

1. They admit that the complainants purchased all the right which the parties named in the answer owned to prepare the Atwood bitters, but they deny that those parties held or possessed the exclusive right to manufacture the same, or any exclusive right whatever to the same, or any exclusive right to any trade-mark, label, or wrapper, consisting of a glass bottle, with panel-shaped sides, and with the raised words and letters “Atwood’s Genuine Physical Jaundice Bitters, Georgetown, Mass,” blown in the glass; nor did they possess any exclusive right to the preparation of the medicine in a liquid form, or to the light yellow printed label pasted to said bottle, upon which were the words “Atwood’s Vegetable Physical Jaundice Bitters.” Nor did they possess any exclusive right to the residue of what is printed upon the label, and set forth in the bill of complaint.

2. That the twelve-panel bottle, the yellow label, the words “Atwood’s Bitters,” together with the other words alleged to be printed on said label, were in public and common use by a large number of manufacturers.

3. That the complainants did not purchase and do not now own the exclusive right nor the entire right to said bottle, label, and words, or either of them, as alleged, because their said assignors were hot the exclusive proprietors of the same, and therefore could not sell and dispose of what they did not own.

4. They deny that Moses Atwood first invented and put up the said medicine tor sale, and allege that it _was first put up by Moses 1'‘. Atwood, of Georgetown, Massachusetts, in connection with L. H. Bateman, not in a paneled bottle,but in a smooth. round bottle, without panels; that the round bottle used by Batcman had no words blown in the glass, and that the bottles which contained words blown in the glass were rectangular in form and without panels, and that Moses Atwood first used a white label and a round bottle having no panels or blown letters.

5. That Moses F. Atwood, and not Moses Atwood,first obtained the formula for the medicine from some physician to these respondents unknown, and prepared the same according to the formula, and not according to any invention of himself or of said Moses Atwood; and that subsequently thereto the medicine put up by him and Bateman began to be called “Atwood’s Bitters.” 6. That the respondent first named, in May, 1861,purchased the recipe for the medicine and the right of using the bottle and label; that he has a right to use the same, and that no person has ever pretended to interrupt him in such use prior to the present suit.
 

1883 John F Henry & Co. Proprietary Medicine stamp.

These were printed by the American Bank Note Company and placed on packaging for Atwood's Bitters and other patent medicines sold by the firm.


7. That L. F. Atwood, the brother of Moses Atwood, also had a right to use the said label and bottle, and that he sold such right to H. H. Hay, of Portland,who uses the same on the bottles containing the medicine.

8. That they have been in the practice of preparing the medicine under the recipe bought of Moses F. Atwood for the period of fourteen years, and that they have spent large sums of money in advertising the medicine and in creating a market for the same.

Proofs were taken on both sides, and the evidence is voluminous and somewhat conflicting. Any discussion of the legal questions arising in the case would not be of much advantage until the facts are ascertained, which will be best accomplished by distinct findings.

Pursuant to that view, the court finds as follows:

1. That Moses Atwood, Georgetown, Massachusetts, commenced preparing the medicine in question nearly forty years ago; that for a time the formula of the ingredients was a secret, and that he soon began to designate the preparation as his medicine more frequently than otherwise, designating it as “ Moses Atwood’s Bitters,” or as "Moses Atwood’s Jaundice Bitters,” and sometimes as “Atwood’s Vegetable Jaundice Bitters." There is no direct proof that he ever adopted any distinct trade-mark, but the evidence of use is such as to warrant the conclusion that he considered the latter designation as representing the article which he manufactured and put up for sale. For a time no other person had any interest in the business, and throughout all that period he put the article up in round smooth bottles without panels or raised words ‘or letters of any kind. Others subsequently acquired an interest in the business with him, among whom were his brother and L. H. Bateman, and the person who subsequently joined with him in the conveyance to Carter &, Dodge. His son, Moses F. Atwood, had worked with him and Batemau at Georgetown in preparing the medicine under the recipe and knew the ingredients of which it was compounded. He, the son, went to work with Bateman in 1860, and he states that they used a fluted bottle containing the name of the medicine and that of ,his father and his place of residence blown into it. ‘

2. That large rights in respect to the business remained in Moses Atwood, notwithstanding the interests in the same acquired by others; that January l, 1848, he entered into a written contract with Moses Carter, by which he sold to the latter bills against local agents in many places in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New York, and the right to sell the medicine in those places, under the terms and conditions following: that he, the manufacturer, should not sell the medicine in those places so league the other party supplied customers there; that he, the proprietor, agreed to make the hitters during ten years for seventeen dollars per barrel, to be delivered in the State where the same were made, three-quarters of the money to be advanced by the other contracting party.

3. Carter and Benjamin S. Dodge, February 2, 1852, formed a copartnership, which, of course, consisted of two parts, but they subsequently took into the firm C. L. Carter, and by interlincations made the articles consist of three parts. They formed the copartnership for making and vending Atwood’s vegetable medicines and essences. Enough appears to afford an inference that a prior agreement between Moses Carter and Dodge of the one part and Moses Atwood of the other had been made, as the record shows that Atwood and Bingham and Cartcrdr Dodge, September 29, 1852, entered into a contract to settle doubts and supply omissions in the supposed antecedent agreement, which was not introduced in evidence. 4. By the contract introduced Moses Atwood and his partner conveyed to Carter dz. Dodge the right to use said Atwood’s name on the labels and circulars, and to manufacture and sell "Atwood’s Vegetable Jaundice Bitters,” and certain other articles, on the ground hereinafter described, and not to sell by themselves or their agents in any other portion of the world, or sell to others to sell, except on the ground hereinafter described. Massachusetts is named, with numerous excepted towns and parts of towns. Towns and places are also excepted from New York. Seven towns are also excepted from New Hampshire; and all of the ~

State of Maine, except the towns of Kittery, South Berwick, and Lebanon. Other exceptions are made in the same instrument not necessary to he noticed in this investigation. Attempt was made to prove by parol the prior agreement referred to in the contract, and with that view reference was made in argument to the cross-examination of Luther F. Carter, who states that there were papers executed to Carter & Dodge, giving them the right to manufacture the hitters, using Moses Atwood’s name, but that he knew nothing about the bottle. When asked if those papers came into his possession, he answered that he didn’t know that they ever did. He was then asked, “If they were ever in your hands, to whom did you deliver them?” and his answer was, “If they were ever in my hands, I delivered them to Eli B. Johnson,” the record showing that the person named was the agent of the complainants. Taken as a whole, the court is of the opinion that the evidence was not sufficient to admit parol testimony of the contents of the instrument, nor would it benefit the complainants if the rule was otherwise, as the witness states that he does not know that the paper or papers conveyed anything more to Carter & Dodge than the right to put up the medicine and use Atwood’s name; nor does the record contain any evidence tending to show that the original proprietor ever gave them the right to sell the medicines in any of the places excepted out of the contract introduced in evidence.

5. That parol evidence was introduced tending to show that Carter & Dodge owned, at the time of their dissolution of copartnership, all the right in Atwood’s Bitters, to manufacture and sell the same, except what Atwood had reserved; but there is no evidence that he ever conveyed to them any right to put up or sell the same in the places reserved, nor is there any evidence tending to show how, if ever, he acquired the interest in the same at one time held by his brother and Bateman. 6. Suggestions were made in argument that Moses

Atwood, in the year 1855, conveyed to Carter &. Dodge, or Carter, Dodge & 00., his entire interest in the business, except his right to sell the medicine beyond Illinois. \Vhat a party does not own of course he cannot sell, and that is a sufficient answer to the proposition, so far as respects the interests which had become vested in others; but the supposed sale might apply to some of the excepted places, not to all, as the same witness admits that Carter & Dodge did not own what Mr. Atwood had reserved, but he says that he once saw the agreement last referred to, and, when asked if he had made search for it, stated that he had made diligent search for it among his father’s old papers. It was about the time that Carter, Dodge & Co. brought the suit against Bateman that he saw the paper, and he says he has not seen it since that time. According to his statement the paper was from Moses Atwood to Carter, Dodge & Co. Carter & Dodge sued Bateman for putting up and selling the medicine and using the trade-mark, and he prevailed in the suit; and yet no search was made among the papers of Mr. Dodge. For aught that appears to the contrary, it may be among his papers, or in the hands of the attorneys in that suit, or in the files of the clerk’s ofiflce.

Two objections are taken to the evidence, both of which may be sustained:

First. That sufficient search is not shown to admit it.

Second. That if it is admitted it has no tendency to show that the conveyance included Maine, or any other of the excepted places; nor does it appear that the grantor reacquired the interests previously vested in other persons.

Localities almost without number were excepted out of the general grant, and the uncontradicted proof is that the original proprietor made reservations in favor of his father, Levi Atwood, and his brother, Levi F. Atwood, of Maine and part of New Hampshire.

7. Viewed in the light of these suggestions, the court finds that Carter & Dodge never acquired the right to put up and sell the medicine in Maine, or in any of the places excepted out of the grant from the original proprietor, nor did they ever acquire the right or title to any of the same reservations in favor of other parties. Trade-marks are an entirety, and are incapable of exclusive use at difl‘erent places by more ‘than one independent proprietor, for the reason that the party seeking redress, in order to establish an exclusive right to the trade-mark, must show that he had an exclusive right in the commodity to which it is attached. (Upton on Trade-Marks, 24; Canham vs. Jones, 2 Vcs. & B., 218.) Throughout the largest portion of the period since 1842 Bateinan, or his son, who succeeded him, put up and sold Atwood’s hitters in the same town with the original proprietor, and the proofs show that he put the medicine up in half-pint glass bottles with the words “Atwood’s Jaundicc Bitters, Moses Atwood, Georgetown, Mass,” blown upon the bottles; that when the proprietor removed, in 1855, he left with Bateman his original recipe for the manufacture of Atwood’s hitters, with all the medicines which he manufactured and sold. Little or nothing was made in the business during the lifetime of Bateman; and when he died his son succeeded to and continued in the business until the heirs transferred the same to the complainants. For a few years Carter & Dodge put up and sold the medicine, in accordance with the course pursued by the original proprietor, when they took into the firm the son of the senior partner, C. L. Carter, and continued to transact the business under the name of Carter, Dodge 8: Co. two or three years longer. \Vhcn they dissolved, and Dodge went out, the new firm, called Carter dz. Son, consisting of Moses Carter and C. L. Carter, took control of the business, and they continued the same for about five years. Subsequently another son of the senior partner joincd tho firm, and they continued the business for two or three years under the firm-name of Carter & Sons. Lastly, the father and the elder son went out, and Luther 1“. Carter took the firm-name of Carter dz. Son, and- continued the business until he sold to the complainants. After Carter &. Dodge dissolved, in 1855, Dodge went to Rowley, and put up and sold the medicine there for five years, using the Atwood labels. On the 4th of September, 1867, he sold and conveyed the right to manufacture and sell Atwood’s bitters to \Villiam Ii. Dorman for the term of fivc years from the date of the agreement, with the right to use the trademarks ho had previously used in the sale of the same. Before that period expired the same party sold the same right to Noyes Manning, now of Mystic, Connecticut, with authority to use the same labels. 8. That Carter & Son had two kinds of labels used on the bottles which they put up for sale. of one of the labels the words “Carter’s are the only genuine” were printed, and below the directions the words “Manufactured by M. Carter & Son, successors to Moses Atwood, Georgetown, Mass,” were also printed. At the bottom of the label were also printed the words “Caution.-Observe that our name is blown in the bottle and on the revenue stamp. None others are genuine." The label also bore the words “Atwood’s Vegetable PhysicalJanndicc Bitters.” Two kinds of hitters were put up at theirplacc. ()ne kind, under the label described, which was the genuine “Atwood’s Vegetable Physical Jaundice Bitters,” sold in the market at wholesale for twenty-seven dollars per gross; the other kind was an inferior article, an imitation of the genuinc, sold in the market at fifteen dollars per gross, hearing the genuine original label of Atwood’s bittcrs, with the “e ” left out in the word “the ” preceding the words United States.’ Cartcr’s traveling agents never sold any but the genuine article, the imitation being disposed of by Carter alone. In most instances the two kinds were retailed at the same price, but when both kinds were known the genuine brought a higher price.

9. That Bateman had the original recipe, and that Moses F. Atwood, the son of the original proprietor, when in the employment of Bateman as a selling agent, sold the recipe for compounding and preparing the Atwood hitters in the State of Maine to Nathan Wood, in 1861. When asked whether the conveyance was in writing, he said it was, and that each party had a copy, and that he sold to the respondent the right to manufacture the hitters and sell the same in the State of Maine and elsewhere. Proof that the grantor had authority from the actual proprietor to execute the conveyance is not shown in the record, but it is shown that the purchaser, with his partner, has continued to prepare, put up, and sell the medicine from the date On the top of the purchase of the recipe to the date of the hill of complaint, without hinderance or interruption, with the exception of the two instances mentioned in the second answer, since the organization of the complainant corporation. None of the grantors of the complainants ever disputed their right to compound, put up, and sell the hitters in question, nor is there any evidence tending to show that tho hitters which they sold were not the genuine Atwood bittcrs. Their grantor possessed the genuine recipe, and the proofs are full to the point that it was the genuine recipe which he sold to the respondent, Nathan Wood. Beyond all doubt the respondent, Nathan \Vood, acquired the recipe, which, not being the subject of a patent, might lawfully be used by any one who possessed the secret; and it is equally certain that be supposed that he had acquired the right to use the labels, as he purchased the right to use the same of the son of the Original proprietor, and of the selling agent of Bateman, whose title to put up the medicine and use the labels was subsequently established by judicial determination.

10. Unlike what is usual in controversies respecting trade-marks, the complainants in this case, instead of using a trade-mark of their own adoption, allege and attempt to prove that the trade-mark in question was adopted by the original proprietor of the medicine, and that they have acquired the title to the same by certain mene conveyances set forth in the record, and the court finds upon that subject as follows:

1. That they or their predecessors, January 1, 1875, acquired. by assignment, whatever right in the same belonged to the heirs and representatives of L. H.Bateman.

2. Also, March 18, in the same year, whatever right belonged to the firm of Noyes & Manning.

3. Also, March 30, in the same year, whatever right belonged to Benjamin C. Dodge.

4. Also, March 30, in the same year, whatever right belonged to William B. Dorman.

5. Also, April 12 and 19, in the same year, whatever right belonged to the Carters in the said trade-mark.

None of these instruments of conveyance, however, convey or profess to convey any greater rights to the complainants than those which were previously held by Carter 81, Dodge; and it is clear that Carter dc Dodge never acquired from the original proprietor any right to put up or sell the medicine in Maine, or to use the labels of the original proprietor in that State out of the three towns specified in the written agreement, which constitutes the evidence of their title.

Nothing remains to be done in the case of much importance, except to state the conclusions of law and fact resulting from the findings of the court.


 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ Dr. L.Q.C. WISHART'S PINE TREE CORDIAL
THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM DAVE OLSENS COLLECTION, THREE GREAT LOOKING WISHART'S PINE TREE CORDIAL WITH EMBOSSED TREE. I DO NOT KNOW WHY I DON'T HAVE ONE OF THESE. GREAT BOTTLES DAVE, THANKS FOR SHARING.
 
Lucius Q. C. Wishart started business as a paint dealer and grocer in Philadelphia, but after patenting his Pine Tree Tar Cordial in 1859, he entered the field of patent medicines; from 1860 through 1873 his listings in the city directories included "patent medicine," "druggist," and "physician" (see McKearin and Wilson, "American Bottles & Flasks and Their Ancestry," p. 304).
 

WISHARTS PINE TREE CORDIAL ~ Dr. L.Q.C. Wishart at No. 10 South Second Street, Philadelphia, compounded Pine Tree Tar Cordial and introduced it to the public in 1859. He soon moved to larger facilities at No. 232 North Second Street. About 1861, he placed Dr. Wishart?s Great American Dyspepsia Pills on the market and in 1865, Dr. Wishart?s Worm Sugar Drops. The latter was advertised in 1875 in Harper?s Weekly. I am not aware of embossed bottles. Wishart?s son Henry R. inherited the Pine Tree Tar Cordial about 1870, and soon sold it to Philadelphia druggists Harry C. Campion and his son John W. John?s brother Franklin joined them, and the firm was called the Campion Brothers until 1897, when Franklin retired. J.W. Campion and Co. was still selling Pine Tree Tar Cordial into the nineteen hundreds. It was for "Consumption of the Lungs, Cough, Sore Throat and Breast, Bronchitis, Liver Complaint, Blind and Bleeding Piles, Asthma, Whooping Cough and Diphtheria, & c.".
Caspar Wistar compounded the original Balsam of Wild Cherry. Isaac Butts, and apothecary near Canterbury, Conn., used the formula in the 1830s, and an 1841 ad indicates that Williams and Company of Philadelphia, prepared it. Isaac Butts, now at 25 Fulton St., New York, had become the sole owner, according to an ad dated December 21, 1843. By the mid 1840s, Benjamin Sanford and John D. Park of Cincinnati, had become agents for at least part of the country. After 1850, the listing was only John D. Park, dealer in patent medicines. His role as an agent for Wistar?s Balsam of Wild Cherry may have ended due to a financial strain, because by 1856, the medicine had come under control of Seth Fowle of Boston; this lasted into the 1880s. Since there are many later bottles with IB. embossed, Fowle probably had IB. bottles produced long after the original relationship with Isaac Butts had ended. Dr. Wistar?s Balsam of Wild Cherry was advertised as the "Great Remedy for Coughs, Colds, Whooping Cough, Bronchitis, Difficulty of Breathing, Asthma, Hoarseness, Sore Throat, Croup and every affection of the Throat, Lungs and Chest, including even Consumption".
A well known fact is that if children didn?t get colds and coughs so frequently, many more general pediatricians would be unemployed. Upper respiratory tract infections and their complications have been the "bread and butter" for Drs. Wishart, Wistar and Cannon all of these years.....

Thanks to the Medicine Chest and Dr.Richard Cannon

References:
1. Baldwin, J.K.: Patent and Proprietary Medicine Bottles of the Nineteenth Century, 1973. 2. Blasi, B.: A Bit About Balsams, 1974. 3. Holcombe, H.W.: Weekly Philatelic Gossip, October 15, 1938. 4. Holst, J.: Pontiled Medicine Price Guide, 1998.  5. Richardson, L.C. and C.G.: The Pill Rollers, 1992. 6. Wilson, B. and B.: Nineteenth Century Medicine in Glass, 1971.

 
BOTTLES OF THE WEEK ~ DEMIIJOHNS FROM DALE SANTOS
 

 
THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS PART OF THE  IMPRESSIVE  DEMIJOHN COLLECTION OF DALE SANTOS.
 
 
McKearin and Wilson, in their book AMERICAN BOTTLES & FLASKS AND THEIR ANCESTRY, provide this account: {THE DEMIJOHN PAGE}


Sometime about the middle of the 18th century, two new names entered the language to designate large glass bottles, usually wickered and used for transport of liquids. They were "demijohn" and "carboy," which were used sporadically by merchants and bottle manufacturers before the 19th century. "Carboy" was used far less often than "demijohn," at least in advertisements. Also, it would seem, neither was admitted to a dictionary until well into the 19th century.
According to accepted derivation, "carboy" was a corruption of the Persian "garabah"; "demijohn" of the old French "dame jeanne," as large bottles were called. Though the spelling of "carboy" apparently was consistent, that of "demijohn," perhaps because it was spelled mainly from its sound when spoken, was most unsettled before 1815; "demi-john," "demi jeanne," "Dame John," "dime-john," "Demie-John," "Demi John," "Demy John," "dimijohn," and "demijohn." "Demijohn," which became official, occurred most frequently.
In the newspaper advertisements covered, the name was not found until 1762, but in 1753 "wickered bottles that will hold 5 gallon" were advertised -- demijohns, of course -- which suggests that "demijohn," however spelled, was unfamiliar before the 1760s. In fa
ct, THE OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY (1933) gives 1769 as the date of its first appearance in print, and for "carboy," 1753, fourteen years before it was found in the advertisements.
In 1767, carboys ranging from a quart to seven gallons in size were offered to the public, and in 1792 demijohns of eight and nine gallons containing spirits of turpentine. The two names, it would seem, were used interchangeably in the eighteenth century, and for the same sizes of bottle. Afterward, the majority of demijohns were bottles from a quart to five gallons in capacity, a few up to ten gallons; carboys were principally a gallon to twenty gallons, with sizes from six gallons predominating.
 
 
 
Demijohn
A  glass  vessel used for storing drinks or other liquids; typically cylindrical without handles and enclosed in wickerwork with a narrow neck that can be plugged or capped.
 
A NICE COLLECTORS STORY ABOUT SOME DEMIJOHNS    DEMIJOHNS
 
 
The demijohn was an colorful part of American commercial and social life for well over 150 years. Like many traditions it disappeared in the industrialized way of life and the rise of name brands.
 
Though covered in wicker for protection, transport carried with it the danger of breakage and so numerous bottle holders were invented and used both commercially and in the household. Most often these consisted of a wooden box-like covering to protect the vessel with various lids or methods of obtaining entry. In case pilfering was a problem at along the way or at home, number patents for bottle locking mechanisms were invented. [Digger Odell]
 
 
FROM DALES  COLLECTION
MORE FROM DALES COLLECTION
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ Dr. DAVID JAYNES INDIAN EXPECTORANT

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF DANA CHARLTON ZARRO  AND IS ONLY 1 OF HER MANY AMERICAN INDIAN MEDICINE COLLECTION. A RARE FIND, THIS PONTIL BASED RARITY HAS SOME INTERESTING CHARACTERISTICS AS DANA POINTS OUT. THE "S" ON JAYNES IS MISSING AS THEY RAN OUT OF ROOM & ON THE REVERSE THE "T" IN EXPECTORANT IS ALMOST OFF THE BOTTLE AS WELL. THE "INDIAN" WAS REMOVED IN 1840,WHAT A GREAT BOTTLE . THANKS DANA!

 

No name perhaps is better known in our country, certainly not in JAYNE Pennsylvania, than that of Jayne, through their long connection with the ministry, medicine and science. The family was founded in Connecticut by William Jayne, born in Bristol, England, from whom the late Dr. Horace Jayne descended through his son, William (2) Jayne, born in Connecticut, where his grandson, Ebenezer, was a Baptist minister and the father of Dr. David Jayne, founder of the world famous Jayne remedies.

Rev. Ebenezer Jayne was educated for the ministry of the Baptist Church, and in addition to his eminence in his holy calling was the author of a Baptist hymn book and of various polemical essays.

Dr. David Jayne, son of Rev. Ebenezer Jayne, was born in Monroe county, Pennsylvania, July 22, 1799, died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March 5, 1866. He spent his early life in Pennsylvania and New York, obtaining his early education in the public schools. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania he practiced his profession in Salem, New Jersey, where his father was minister of the Baptist Church, and later in Philadelphia, about 1830 he began to manufacture and sell on a large scale the cough medicine he had prescribed in his own practice, now known as Jayne's "Expectorant." From the profits derived, Dr. Jayne began the erection of a large building for office purposes in Philadelphia, commencing in 1849 and before his death had erected several large buildings of marble and granite that bore his name. He is said to have been the first manufacturer to publish almanacs as an advertising medium and these he printed in all the modern languages of Europe and Asia, even including some of the minor dialects of India. He possessed wonderful capacity, combining with the skill of a trained physician, the qualities necessary to the executive management of his large business. In political faith he was a Whig, later a Republican, and in religion adhered to the Baptist Church. He was thrice married; his third wife, Hannah Fort, born in Burlington, New Jersey, being the mother of Dr. Horace Jayne, Bertha, who died in infancy, and a son Henry La Barre, born in 1857, now an attorney of Philadelphia, who married Elizabeth Matthews of Boston and resides at No. 1035 Spruce street, Mrs. Hannah (Fort) Jayne died in Philadelphia, May 15, 1904.

Dr. Horace Jayne, second son and third child of Dr. David and Hannah (Fort) Jayne, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March 17, 1859, where his early life was spent. He prepared in private schools, was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, A. B., class of 1879, then entering the medical department of the University, was graduated M. D., class of 1882. He went to Europe the same year and continued during 1883 the study of biology at the University of Leipsic and at Jena, under the great scientist, Heckel. Returning to the United States, he studied at Johns Hopkins University, 1883 and 1884. During his college years, Dr. Jayne won honors; was junior orator of his class, and vice-president of the Franklin Scientific Society and in the medical school was awarded the Henry C. Lea prize for the best graduation, these also taking the Anomaly prize.

In 1883 he began his long connection with the University of Pennsylvania as an instructor, being first appointed assistant instructor in biology. In 1884 he became professor of vertebrate morphology, continuing until 1894; secretary of the faculty of biology from 1884 to 1889; director of Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology from 1894 to 1905, and dean of the college faculty from 1889 to 1894. He was an authority on human and mammalian anatomy and the author of many works of a scientific nature, including "Monstrosities in North American Coleoptera," "Revision of the Dermeotidae of North America," "Notes on Biological Subjects," "Origin of the Fittest,"' "Mammalian Anatomy" (1889) and numerous contributions to the scientific journals.

He was a Fellow of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Philadelphia, and ot the American Association for the Advancement of Science; was a member of the American Philosophical Society; The Philadelphia Academy of Natural Science; The Society of American Naturalists; The American Entomological Society; The American Academy of Political and Social Science; The Franklin Institute of Philadelphia; a trustee of Drexel Institute; a director of the Academy of Music of Philadelphia, and president of the Free Library of Wallingford. He was contributing editor of "The Journal of Morphology," "The Anatomical Record" and "The Journal of Exp. Zoology." His clubs were the University and Rittenhouse of Philadelphia, bctii of which he served as treasurer.

Dr. Jayne married, October 10, 1894, Caroline Augusta Furness, born January 3, 1873, died June 23, 1909, daughter of Horace Howard Furness, Ph.D., LL.D., L. D. D., the greatest of modern Shrtkespenan scholars; children: Kate Furness, born July 29, 1895; Horace Howard Furness, June 9, 1898, both attending private schools in Philadelphia.

Dr. Jayne, who was eminent in the world of science, was a most kindly approachable man, numbering as his most devoted friends those of lowly life who served him with a willingness that can only come from unselfish regard. He held the honorary degree of Ph.D., conferred by Franklin and Marshall College in 1893. He died July 9, 1913.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ G.W. WESTON & Co., SARATOGA N.Y.

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE JACK STECHER, A REAL BEAUTY AND RARELY COMES UP. I ADDED SOME INFORMATION ABOUT THE HISTORY OF G.W. WESTON & CO. AND ALSO SOME INFORMATION ON THE SPRING  BEARING HIS NAME FOR A PERIOD IN HISTORY.

 

 

"It's embossed G.W.Weston & Co. Saratoga N.Y and considered a wide mouth jar,( by collectors), rolled lip, no pontil, and has the original McKearin sticker still on the base. Not many of these around, according to Tucker and Waddy."

 

1855  proprietors Messrs. G. W. Weston & Co.

It was analyzed by Prof. E. Emmons in 1846, and found to be highly medicinal in its properties.

The Analysis of the Empire Water, by Prof. E. Emmons, is as follows:
Chloride of Sodium, 269.696       Bicarbonate of Lime 141.824

Bicarbonate of Magnesia, 41.984      Bicarbonate of Soda, 30.848
Hydriodate of Soda or Iodine, 12.000     Bicarbonate of Iron, a trace 000
Solid contents in a gallon, 496.352     Specific gravity, 1.039

The following remarks are copied from the American Journal of Agriculture and Science, and the facts as stated in 1846 have been fully corroborated by observation and experience:

" The most remarkable fact brought out by this analysis is, the presence of a large quantity of Iodine. We were able to detect it in one ounce of the water. This water, too, is mainly free from iron, as tincture of nutgalls after standing twenty-four hours produced merely a green tinge or color, and the salt when evaporated, is white or slightlyyellowish white. The Spring, it seems to us, is quite an accession to the waters of Saratoga. It has a remarkably pleasant saline taste, with a pungency and liveliness which makes it agreeable as a beverage. For bottling it is equal to the Congress, remaining transparent longer than that water when its carbonic acid has escaped."

The water of the Empire Spring is bottled with the utmost care, and packed in strong boxes, suitable for exportation, by the subscribers.

Orders should be addressed to G. W. WESTON & CO., Saratoga Springs, or at their Depot, 68 Barclay street, New York.


EMPIRE SPRING.

This spring is situated near the base of a high limestone bluff in the northerly part of the village, about three-fourths of a mile from the Congress Spring, and is the most northerly spring of any considerable importance within the village limits. The presence of mineral water in this locality had been known for a long period; but, owing to the popularity of the Congress Spring, and the great expense attending the excavations and improvements requisite to make the water practically available, its development was neglected until the year 1846, when William and Henry S. Hoblnson, who were the owners of the property, undertook to tube it. They made an excavation about twelve feet in depth, eight of which passed through the dense hard pan to the solid rock, from which the water was found to issue so copiously that it became a task of no small magnitude properly to secure it. It was tubed, however, directly from the rock, and in the most thorough and satisfactory manner. The water immediately attracted general attention, and it was evident that it was of a quality scarcely, if at all, inferior in any respect to that of the Congress Spring, as a cathartic and diuretic, while a chemical analysis, which was made during the same year by Prof E. Emmons, then State Geologist, and a man of eminent scientific attainments, developed the fact that it possessed some valuable properties which adapted it to the successful treatment of various forms of lung complaints—a class of diseases hitherto thought to be beyond the remedial powers of the waters of this locality. The knowledge of its characteristic properties thus acquired, so favorably impressed Prof. Emmons that he immediately purchased one-fourth interest in the spring; and its successful use in the treatment of diseases has given it a rapidly increasing popularity and fully confirmed the favorable opinions originally founded upon its scientific analysis. It has proved itself adapted to a wide range of cases, especially of a chronic nature, and its peculiar value has become a well-recognized fact among medical men.

From the general resemblance of this to the Congress Spring, it was at first called the "New Congress ;" but afterwards, in 1848, when it came into the hands of George W. Weston and PeckHam H. Green, it received its present name, as significant of its speedily acquired importance. These parties, under the firm name of G. W. WesTon & Co., commenced bottling the water, and making extensive improvements, particularly in the opening of streets, and draining and ornamentthe opening of streets, and draining and ornamenting the grounds, and their business soon acquired a considerable degree of magnitude.

In 1861, the property was sold for $100,000 to D. A. Knowlton, and in 1863, Knowlton conveyed the same to the Saratoga Empire Spring Company, by whom the present buildings were erected. This company transferred the property by dsed to the Congress & Empire Spring Company, upon its consolidation with that company, in 1865, the latter company thus assuming its management in connection with that of the Congress Spring, as already stated.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ ENSIGN SALOON, SAN FRANCISCO

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF TIM HENSON,  ANY SALOON FLASKS/BOTTLES FROM OUT WEST ARE ALWAYS SOUGHT AFTER AND THIS ONE IS A REAL BEAUTY. THE BEAUTIFUL COLOR YOU SEE IS DUE TO THE MANGANESE THAT WAS IN THE GLASS GATHER AND WHEN EXPOSED TO SUNLIGHT/ULTRA VIOLET LIGHT WILL OVER TIME TAKE ON THIS COLOR, I DUG UP SOME INFORMATION ON THE SALOON AND HISTORY OF THE TERM ITS SELF. THANKS TIM, GREAT FLASK.
 
 
From the third quarter of the 1800s into the 1900s San Francisco was known for its abundance of saloons, the Ensign Saloon located at Market Street with the back door exiting on East street was one. It was said that if you walked into the Ensign and hollered Captain that half the men there would stand up. May be why the name Ensign was given as it was a sea farers hot spot of the period.


Buried Ships of San Francisco

Rome — "a big Russian hulk that cost me [Lawson] about $1,000...used for a coal ship and sunk...at the southwest corner of Market and East streets, under where the Ensign saloon was. Her bow touches the edge of Market street. I sank her for Joseph Galloway..."  "Project workers digging a tunnel near the Ferry Building discovered what appears to be the remains of a 200-foot Gold Rush-era ship...tunneling crews...hit the hull of the ship during digging...project archeologists believe that the ship is either the Roma or Othello...the ship was unearthed about 35 feet underground in an area that was once known as Yerba Buena Cove...Initial surveys indicate that the ship may be close to 200 feet long, with a 30-foot beam.
 
SALOONS

A Western saloon is a kind of bar particular to the Old West. Saloons served customers such as fur trappers, cowboys, soldiers, prospectors, miners, and gamblers. The first saloon was established at Brown's Hole, Wyoming, in 1822, to serve fur trappers. By the late 1850s the term saloon had begun to appear in directories and common usage as a term for an establishment that specialized in beer and liquor sales by the drink, with food and lodging as secondary concerns in some places. By 1880, the growth of saloons were in full swing. In Leavenworth, Kansas there were "about 150 saloons and four wholesale liquor houses

Saloons in America began to have a close association with breweries in the early 1880s. With a growing overcapacity, breweries began to adopt the British “tied-house” system of control where they owned saloons outright. Brewers purchased hundreds of storefronts, especially on the highly desired corner locations, which they rented to prospective saloon keepers, along with furnishings and recreational equipment such as billiard tables and bowling alleys. Schlitz Brewing Company and a few others built elaborate saloons to attract customers and advertise their beers.

Legislative factors also played a factor in the growth of brewery owned saloons. The Chicago City Council increased the saloon license from $50 to $500 between 1883 and 1885 to pay for an expanded police force made necessary by the barrooms. Relatively few independent proprietors could afford to pay such amounts.

Politicians also frequented local saloons because of the adaptable social nature of their business. In neighborhoods where literacy was low, the bar provided the principal place for the exchange of information about employment and housing. A savvy politician could turn his access to resources into votes. In factory districts, saloons became labor exchanges and union halls, as well as providing a place to cash paychecks.
Temperance illustration of drunkard hitting his wife

Beginning in 1893, the Anti-Saloon League began protesting against American saloons. In 1895 it became a national organization and quickly rose to become the most powerful prohibition lobby in America, pushing aside its older competitors the Woman's Christian Temperance Union and the Prohibition Party. The League lobbied at all levels of government for legislation to prohibit the manufacture or import of spirits, beer and wine. Ministers had launched several efforts to close Arizona saloons after the 1906 creation of League chapters in Yuma, Tucson, and Phoenix. League members pressured local police to take licenses from establishments that violated closing hours or served women and minors, and they provided witnesses to testify about these violations. Its triumph was nationwide prohibition locked into the Constitution with passage of the 18th Amendment in 1920. It was decisively defeated when prohibition was repealed in 1933.

The traditional saloon was declining many years before Prohibition. The automobile took patronage away from the pedestrian institution. Nickelodeons also competed for the entertainment niche. An increasing numbers of employers demanded abstinence during the workday. City health departments also enacted regulations that eliminated many features of the free lunch table. Finally, World War I brought not only an attack on anything that seemed remotely German but also a temporary ban on brewing.
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ ROHRER'S WILD CHERRY TONIC
 
THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF ERIC RICHTER OF   1780  FARMHOUSE.COM
  WHO NOW RESIDES IN LANCASTER COUNTY PA. AND HAS WANTED TO ADD THIS TO HIS COLLECTION FOR A WHILE.THIS BOTTLE HAS IT ALL, PONTILED,ROPE CORNERS,GREAT SHAPE AND LOTS OF EMBOSSING...GREAT BOTTLE ERIC, THANKS FOR SHARING.
 
 
JEREMIAH ROHRER : WILD CHERRY TONIC EXPECTORAL

Jeremiah Rohrer is first listed in the Lantis Lancaster City Directory from 1866-1867. He was listed as wines, liquors and Rohrer's Wild Cherry Tonic. His establishment (liquor store ) was located at 22 Penn Street Lancaster, Pa. In the same directory he is also listed under Herb Bitters Manufactures.

 Below is a list of directories Jeremiah Rohrer is listed in.

1863-1864 Gopsill's Lancaster City Directory. Jeremiah is not listed.

1866-1867 Lantis Lancaster City Directory. Wines, liquors and Rohrer's Wild Cherry Tonic. Also listed under Herb Bitters Manufactures. 22 Penn Square.

1869-1870 Lancaster City Directory. Bitters Manufacture also manufacture of Rohrer's Wild Cherry Tonic. 115 S. Queen Street. Also advertises on several pages in this directory.

1882-1883 Howe's Lancaster City Directory. Wines & liquors 22 Center Square.

1884 Ferris Bros. Lancaster City Directory. Wines and liquor wholesale 22 center Square.

1888 Williams Lancaster City Directory. Liquor store 22 Penn Square.

1890 Williams Lancaster City Directory. Wholesale liquors 22 Penn Square. 1892 Williams Lancaster City Directory. Bitters manufacture of Rohrer's Wild Cherry Tonic 22 Penn Square.

1894-1895 Williams Lancaster City Directory. Liquor store 22 Center Square. 1896 Williams Lancaster City Directory. Wholesale wines and liquors 22 Center Square.

1897 Lancaster City Directory. Jeremiah & Howard 22 Penn Square.   1898 Lancaster City Directory. Jeremiah & Howard Rohrer wholesale liquor 22 Penn Square.   1899-1900 Lancaster City Directory. Jeremiah & Howard wholesale liquor 22 Penn Square.

References:      Lancaster City Directories from 1863-1900.
(c) 2011 Frank Wicker
 
 
 
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ WILLINGTON G11-62


BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF MIKE BRAUSER, WHAT AN AMAZING LOOKING BOTTLE THIS IS. DESIGNATED AS G11-62 AND VERY SOUGHT AFTER FOR OBVIOUS REASONS.THANKS FOR SHARING MIKE, I ADDED INFO ON THE GLASS WORKS FROM CONN. MUSEUM OF GLASS.
 
 
 
The West Willington Glassworks 1814-1872

In 1814, a stock company was formed by John Turner, Ebenezer Root and Frederick Rose, all presumably from Coventry, CT and Roderick Rose, Stephen Brigham Jr, Elisha Brogham and Spafford Brigham, all of Mansfield, CT. Abiel Johnson Jr was also said to have been part of the organizing group which was clearly competing against the Pitkin Glassworks, The John Mathers Glassworks and the Coventry glassworks.

They remained the owner until 1828 when Gilbert, Turner & Company acquired the glassworks as well as the Coventry works. This company operated the Willington glassworks until 1847.

There was a Hartford agent named Lee, Hopkins & Butler who advertised Willington porters in 1829. In 1847, Gilbert, Turner and Company sold the works to a group of six men. Harvey Merrick, Elisha Carpenter, William M. Still, William & Francis Shaffer and James McFarlane.

The first output of glass bottles consisted of inkwells, snuffs, demijohns, chestnuts and flasks including some pitkin types. There were reportedly a few rare sealed bottles as well. As far as we know, there were no marked bottles or flasks prior to 1849. From this date to 1872, demijohns dominated the sales with wines, some bitters and even a booze bottle cabin figural. Perhaps the most famous of the wares are the Willington gothic cathedral type pickle jars of varying sizes and colors. They also produced base-embossed cylindrical bottles (there are 9 variants known), varying sizes of berry bottles in olive amber and olive green colors, and of course, the popular Liberty Eagle marked flasks in 1/2 pint, pint & quart moulds. The Willington glassworks also produced utility bottles, insulator types, rolling pins and assorted tableware. The colors of the glass were similar to Pitkin's & Coventry's but the shades of greens are among the most beautiful glass ever produced in this country.

The Willington Historical Society has many members with interest in the local glass and Connecticut glass also. They have regular meetings with guest speakers and presentations. A glass display and historic museum are in the works. 
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ FRANK WRIGHTS ALE, INDIANAPOLIS

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF TIM HENSON, FRANK WRIGHT 'S ALE INDIANAPOLIS. I LIKE THE FORM OF THIS BOTTLE, TIM IS SEARCHING FOR THE GREEN VARIANT OF THIS BEAUTY ...GOT ONE? GREAT BOTTLE TIM, THANKS FOR SHARING.

 

 JOHN H. WRIGHT

Was the first merchant of Indianapolis to inaugurate the system of selling goods for cash only, which he did in the fall of 1838, at which time he first made this city his residence; but he soon discovered that the Hoosiers were not willing to
give up the credit system, by which they had done business from the first settlement of the place, so he gradually fell into the prevailing custom of the times.

He was born on the eastern shore of Maryland, but when a boy, with his father's family, removed to Philadelphia, from Philadelphia to Richmond, Indiana, where he was principally raised, and was engaged in business previous to his removal to this place.
He was a fine business man, and during his eight years residence in this city did a large business in the sale of dry goods and purchase of produce. He was the first person to purchase and pack pork in this place for a foreign market. He died in the summer of 1846, leaving a wife and two sons, all of whom yet reside in the city. His wife was afterwards married to Dr. Charles Parry and yet resides in her elegant mansion on the northeast corner of Ohio and Meridian streets.

His eldest son, Frank, is engaged largely in the brewing and manufacture of ale, which is well known in this and other markets as " Frank Wright's Cream Ale."

The second son, Dr. Mansur Wright, is one of the practicing physicians of the city. The two sons inherit to a considerable degree the liberality and companionable qualities for which their father was justly celebrated.


 Frank Wright began and maintained for several years an ale brewery on or near the site of the large Mau& lager beer brewery, about the time the war broke out. C. F. Schmidt's enterprise, now the most considerable in the state, was commenced earlier than Wright's. Lieber's and. Maus's are both later. The beer product of 1873, by the Board of Trade report, was $317,000, with a capital of $125,000 and 45 hands. In 1880, the last report that has been made or published, the value of the beer product was$477,000 and the number of the hands employed 74



An Indianapolis, Ind , court recently decided the case of Frank M. Wright, charged with operating a brewery agency in the city without taking out the required license of J 1,000. The court decided Wright had been guilty of no violation of the city ordinance in question for the reason that he had purchased his beer outright from foreign breweries and the product was therefore his personal property which he could retail or wholesale to saloons or individuals in this city at will This is a hint to brewers of which they ought to avail themselves wherever such licenses are imposed

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ VERY RARE CHALMERS CATAWBA WINE BITTERS
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS AN EXTREMELY RARE CHALMERS CATAWBA WINE BITTERS FROM THE COLLECTION OF DALE MIASKO AND IS ONE OF A HANDFUL KNOWN TO EXIST. WHAT A GREAT BOTTLE THIS IS, I HAVE ALWAYS CONSIDERED AQUA BOTTLES TO HAVE A CERTAIN APPEAL ALL THEIR OWN AND THIS IS A PERFECT EXAMPLE OF THAT. I HAVE ALSO ADDED HIS SITE "OREGON TRAIL ANTIQUE BOTTLES & GLASS" AS THIS MONTHS SITE OF THE MONTH SO BE SURE TO CHECK THAT OUT AS WELL. THANK YOU DALE FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE YOUR GREAT SITE AND OF COURSE THIS BEAUTIFUL PIECE OF WESTERN HISTORY, AWESOME.
 
 
 
 
 
Chalmers Catawba Wine Bitters
   The Chalmer's Catawba Wine Bitters has an incredible history in the West. It is the only true "historical" or commemorative bottle as it celebrates the most significant event in Western U.S. history, the California Gold Rush. Gold was discovered at Coloma at Sutters old Mill, and this bottle clearly depicts this site in glass. Blown in 1873, the majority of these were shipped to Nevada, and as the text indicates, Utah. I have never heard of so much as a shard of a Chalmer's dug in Utah. If anyone has, please let me know. There are approx. 12-15 examples of this bottle known in any condition.

Vineyard House and Vineyard of Coloma   

    The following is a true account of the famous "Vineyard House" and Vineyard of Coloma.  This was one of the largest winery operations in both Amador and El Dorado Counties.  The Vineyard House has a long and tortured history.  I'll leave the ghost stories to other web sites.  The following report was written by Martin Allhoff Jr., who's father established the vineyards and winery in the early 1850's.  The report was written in 1933 most likely in an attempt to preserve the much forgotten history of what was once a major hub of political and social activity in early California History.  The author died 9 years after writing this report and was buried across the street next to his father.  Today, the house remains intact.  It is owned by a private family and, unfortunately,  is not accessible to the general public.  The following text is exactly as Mr. Allhoff wrote it in 1933, complete with spelling, punctuation, and other various errors which lend to it's authenticity.


History of the Coloma Vineyard Winery and Coloma Vineyard House:

  I was lucky enough to stumble upon a few more photographs related to the vineyard house.  The following are pictures of Robert Chalmers, Louisa Allhoff/Chalmers and check out the high-res, worth the wait, image of the vineyard house at approximately 1900.  This is the only photo I have ever seen of the vineyard house which actually shows some of the grape vines which once covered many acres, also if you look close, you'll see the Marshall Monument in the background to the right.
  Martin Allhoff / Martin Allhoff Jr.  Robert Chalmers / Louisa Weaver
A HISTORY OF THE COLOMA VINEYARD WINERY AND COLOMA VINEYARD HOUSE  Martin J. Allhoff Sacramento, Calif., Oct. 26th-1933A correct History of the once Celebrated Coloma Vineyard Winery And Coloma Vineyard House
This winery at one time was numbered with the largest in the State and today nothing remains but the house - a photo of the house is attached to this report. The Winery, Distillery and Barn that at one time housed from 12 to 14 Horses used on the Vineyard and for hauling was torn down in 1883. The Cooperage including the 600 gallon capacity improved Johnson Still (copper) was sold to the California Winery at Sacramento, Calif.  This Vineyard and Winery was started by my father Martin Allhoff in the early fifties and is located about one quarter of a mile southeat of the main town of Coloma: it adjoins the Marshall Monument which is on the west side.  The three connecting buildings of the Winery were built on sloping land therby giving each of them a ground floor.    On the first floor was the entrances to each of the Cellars or Vaults.  The first and Second Cellars were built by my father Martin Allhoff in 1860 and 1866; both of these Cellars were built of Soft White Rock quarried at Granite Hill about two miles South of Coloma both of these two cellars were arched overhead with stone.  These two Cellars contained Sixteen five hundred gallon casks made of Eastern Oak with manhole to each cask.  The Third Cellar was built by Robert Chalmers in  1875.  The side walls and ends were built of Granite taken from the Old Coloma County Jail built in early days and afterwards torn down when the County Seat was removed to Placerville, Calif. In 1856.  The east side of this cellar was built up with shelves for Bottled Wine, Brandy and Cordials ready for any imergency order, The laying of the corner stone to this cellar was duly celebrated by many prominent people or citizens of Coloma who made speeches suitable for this occasion, standing on the corner stone.  In this corner stone were deposited a bottle each of the different wine, Brandy & Cordials manufactured at this winery, also letters, papers & etc a number of old relics by Mr. Marshall (James Wilson Marshall, Discoverer of Gold).Joining this cellar was the main business office and the Western union Telegraph Office.  On this floor bottles and Barrels were washed and made ready for use also Bottling room and when Labels were placed on each bottle, wagons were also loaded from this floor ready to be hauled to Shingle Springs and Auburn and placed
on board the train two four horse teams  were always on hand to haul the Shipments.  The principle destinations of the Shipments were to Nevada and Utah.The first floor of the Second building was used for a fermenting room.  It was equipped with a large Stove used only when necessary to complete the fermentation of wines when the weather turned cold and stopped the fermentation large puncheons and Barrels  were used in this room.The third building the largest, contained the Hopper where wagons loaded with grapes would back in after bing weighed on How es Standard Scales which had a weighing capacity of ten tons the grapes would be unloaded on this Hopper where four men ready waiting to rub the berries from the stems, the berris falling through to a large roller were then crushed and from there the mash was transferred to the large fermentation vats and treated according to the kind of wine to be made.This floor had twelve fermenting vats averaging in size from three hundred to twelve thousand gallons a two inch rubber hose was used to carry the wine down to the Cellars.  All wine and first and second water from the vats for distillation was run into a receiving tank nearby which was connected with the distillery by pipe.  The Still was one of Johnsons Improved (Copper) with a Six hundred gallon Boiler, the distillery was located about fifty yards north of the Winery. This Winery was supplied with clear spring water and piped to all parts of the Winery. On the top of this building is a large Bell and was rang every day at 12 noon except Sundays and holidays Correct time was received every day over the Western Union Tel Wires and all inhabitance of the town could adjust their clocks to the correct time.  This Bell could be heard at Lotus two miles distance.The Coloma Vineyard and Orchard consisted of about 160 acres and nearly every variety of grapes used for wine making was raised on this Vineyard  Many tons were bought from other growers and the quantity of grapes crushed each Season would average from fifty to one hundred tons.The closing of this Winery cased many men to be out of employment one particular feature about this Winery was that during its existance not one employee had ever been discharged for drunkenness or being intoxicated during working hours. (what remains of the winery & cellar)The Coloma Vineyard House still in existence is a two story building all hand finished with granite and Brick foundation.  It was built by Robert Chalmers in 1879 at a cost of $15,000 furnished  The main building consisted of 18 Rooms Bath Room also Ball room 25 by 90 feet  Under the Ball was the dining room Kitchen, Pantry wood shed and Toilet.  The basement consisted of two large storerooms Bar or wine room and reading room this room was used as a Band Room where the Marshall Monument Brass and Reed Band organized with Joseph Reinhart from Georgia Slide as teacher.  Mr Reinhart led the first Coloma Band in the early fifties which played for the mock funeral held for Abraham Lincoln who was assassinated which president of the U. S. hundred of miners and citizens marched and took part in this parade. The Coloma Vineyard House was noted for its excellent dinners and suppers served and all meals were strictly under the supervision of Mrs. Hardie (nee Allhoff) each year a Reunion was given and the very best of music was obtained for this occasion.  People from all parts of the county waited for the date of this Reunion.
On the day of the Unveiling of the Marshall Monument (May 3rd, 1890) thousands of people who attended the ceremonies from all parts made this day a very busy one over four hundred sat at the first table which was repeated several times.  Gov R.W. Waterman Gov of California and his Staff sat at the head of the table in the main dining room.  The Governor and others made brief speeches appropriate for the occasion.  The dance in the evening was crowded to its fullest capacity dancing being almost impossible owing to the dense crowd but all enjoyed themselves under the circumstances when all went home after the Ball was over remarking what a glorious time they had.     Marshall Monument Unveiling

The Payroll for the Vineyard and Winery would run from $500 to $600 per month during the month when grape picking and wine making was being done the expense would be greater The names of the various kind of wines cordials and Brandies manufactured at this Winery are here given, vizWines Angelica, Burgundy, Sherry, Port, Green - Hungarian. Zinfindel Claret. Dry Muscat. Sweet - Muscat.  Catawba. Iabella. Tokay. Sauterne. Reisling. Cocomingo.Cordials. Blackberry. Grape Brandy. Blackberry Brandy. Chalmers Catawba Wine Bitters. Orange Bitters.
Martin Allhoff was born at Britsenhem on the River Rhine Aug 21st 1827.  He came to Coloma ElDorado Co California in 1849 with his brother john allhoff he engaged in mining and soon had sufficient money to buy a home and about 35 acres of land.  He then went back to Dayton Ohio and was married to Louisa M. Weaver in 1852 then came back to Coloma Calif.  his brother John allhoff also went back to Dayton Ohio and remained there.  Martin went into the wine business and was very successful in his undertaking being well versed in the manufacturing of wines and Brandy he soon gained a wide reputation for his product, his market being principally in the State of nevada outside of his local trade in California.  All goods at that time had to be hauled by team as there were no other means of transportation.  No railroads were built at that time and while on one of these trips with goods he took suddenly ill at Virginia City on Oct 9th 1867 and died.  His remains were brought to Coloma and F and A M Masons of which Lodge he was a member at Coloma Calif and burried in the Allhoff plot.     Martin AllhoffPioneer Cemetary Coloma

    There were 3 children in the family - Joseph Allhoff who was Born Sept 17th 1857, and died July 19th 1897, Charles Allhoff Born Jan 22nd 1863 and died April 25th 1866 and Martin J. Allhoff is still living.  (**Note Martin Allhoff, who wrote this text in 1933 died in 1942 as indicated on the above tomb).  Louisa M. Weaver was born at Millhousen France Nov 11th 1838 and was married to martin Allhoff in Dayton Ohio in 1852 and came with her husband to Coloma ElDorado Co California.  She died at San Jose Calif on Nove 18th 1913 and her remains were brought to Coloma by Martin J. Allhoff her son and Burried in the Allhoff plot beside her husband and children.  The funeral was conducted by the Rebeka Lodge of Placerville which she had been a long steady member.  In 1870 she married Robert Chalmers who died at Coloma Calif June 2nd 1880 and buried in the Chalmers plot.  They had 3 children.  Robert Jr. died Feby 24th 1873 - William Chalmers died April 13th 1876 both children were buried in the Chalmers plot at Coloma Calif.  Louisa B. Chalmers was born Feby 4th 1877 at Coloma Clif and died at the Lane Hospital San Francisco Calif July 13th 1900 at which place she was employed as a trained nurse  She was burried in the Allhoff plot in Coloma Calif beside her mother the funeral being conducted by the Rebeka Lodge of Placerville Calif which she had been a member of for many years.     LouisaPioneer Cemetary Coloma
  Robert chalmers died June 2nd 1880 his brother George Chalmers who at that time was in business at Stockton calif and Louisa M. Chalmers wife of Robert chalmers were appointed Executor and Executrix of his Estate which was appraised at about forty eight thousand dollars but on account of litigation brought against the Estate by Hon Chas N. Fox attorney for Louisa M. Chalmers her name was withdrawn as Executrix of the Chalmers Estate, which left George Chalmers sole Executor of the Estate.  Many thousand gallons of wine, Brandies, Cordials and other liquors on hand had to be sold to satisfy the creditors, the principal place for the Sale of thse goods were to the regular customers.  In Nevada, and Utah when these goods were well advertised this required a Salesman which was attened to by George chalmers when business kept him from attending to this duty he was assisted by Martin J. Allhoff who had full charge of the winery and Shipping from Coloma Calif.     ChalmersPioneer Cemetary Coloma

P.S. I had full charge of all parts of the business during Mr. Chalmers lifetime and assisted in closing up the Estate.                                                                                      Mart J. Allhoff
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ RARE HARRISON'S COLUMBIAN INK

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM THE MICHEAL GEORGE COLLECTION AND WHAT A GREAT LOOKING BOTTLE IT IS AND...IT IS FOR SALE !! YES, YOU CAN OWN THIS PIECE OF AMERICAN HISTORY AND ART. VISIT MICHEAL'S FOR SALE SITE HERE .. THANK YOU MICHEAL AND THE FAULKNER'S, GREAT STUFF.  I HAVE POSTED BELOW SOME GREAT INFORMATION COURTESY OF AN ARTICLE BY ED & LUCY FAULKNER  ( SITE )
 
 
APOLLOS W. HARRISON
BY ED & LUCY FAULKNER
 
The Harrison Columbian Ink Company is probably the most well known 19th century ink company, not only by ink collectors, but by bottle collectors in general. The first listing of the company in the Philadelphia City Directory was 1847 at 8 1/2 S. 7th Street, according to McKeanin and Wilson in their book. This address is listed through 1851. The company was known as Apollos W. Harrison, Books, Maps and Ink. The last reference they could find was 1877, which was a home address. There is also no reference to HC in a report published by the Boston City government in 1891 that listed major ink companies of the time, so it is probable they were out of business before then. Their small aqua ink bottles are easily found at bottle shows, and at any given time, there is usually one on Ebay. Larger size and colored ones are more difficult to obtain. And of course, the large gallon cobalt one makes the news every time it is sold, the last time for $30,000 plus buyer?s premium in the Mebane auction. However, like most other 19th century ink companies, Harrison made other products and was not known as just an ink company. Products we know they made (from known bottles) include hair dye, perfumes, tonic stimulants, and flavoring extract. Pontiled and smooth bottom bottles are known.  (SEE HERE) While other ink companies made hair dye, perfumes, tonics and extracts are a bit unusual for an ink company. By 1861, the Harrison Company was known as the Harrison?s Columbian Perfumery and Ink as can be seen on the company envelope. His business address on this envelope is 26 South 7th Street. The stamp dates this envelope to the 1857- 1861 period (the actual postmark date is not legible). Perforated stamps were first used in 1857 and this stamp (No. 26) was taken out of circulation at the beginning of the Civil War. The Civil War caused many problems for the postal service. The Union decided to withdraw and invalidate all existing stamps, issuing new and different ones. The Confederate post offices were ordered to return all stamps, but it is doubtful that they did so. Confederate post offices eventually issued their own stamps. By August of 1861, the Union had issued new stamps although the old ones were accepted in exchange until the end of that year, after which any one used was marked with ?Old Stamps Not Recognized?. For the complete story, we suggest reading a history of the Confederate and US postal Services. As many large ink companies were established in the mid-1800?s, perhaps competition was a reason for turning to other products. One of the most unusual ones for an ink and perfume company, was a Tonic Stimulant. I don?t have access to a picture, but one was sold in the Watt White auction in 1996-97. It had a label and was still in the box. Also in that auction was a large hair dye and a labeled bottle?Extracts for the Handkerchief. Ladies commonly perfumed their handkerchiefs. Perfumed ink was also popular during that period, although I can find no reference to it by Harrison. Perfume bottles include the large clear one pictured here, as well as the aqua octagonal one, a round clear one with attached lid, and a small rectangular one, similar to a small ink bottle. All are This label from an early shipping box gives the 8 1/2 South 7th Street address. Bottles and Extras Spring 2004 9 Company envelope, circa 1860. embossed Harrison?s Columbian Perfumery with the rectangular one being embossed vertically. A large round one was also sold in the Mebane auction. Another product made by Harrison was flavoring extract. The bottle is the typical rectangular bottle with embossing and label. Without the label, one would probably never pick it up at a show. It is clear and the embossing on one side is A.W. Harrison, and the other, Philadelphia. The label reads flavoring extract with an address for the company at 10 South 7th Street. Also pictured here are two small flat hair dye bottles, one aqua, pontiled, and the other clear with a smooth bottom. The small one is only 2.5" tall and probably contained only one use. Note that on both these bottles, the ?S?s? are reversed. While their ink bottles are very popular, there seems to be less interest in these bottles even though they are much less common than the small inks. They generally sell at modest prices for bottles this old and uncommon. With these companion bottles being overlooked by most collectors, we are able to add to our collection of go-withs fairly inexpensively. Check at the next show you attend for these bottles and let us know if you find any different ones that we may not have seen.  We can be reached at:  Faulkner@antiquebottles.com.
 
 OBITUARY
A. W. Harrison?Death at Sea.
Apollos W. Harrison
Harrison?s Columbian Perfumery and Ink Company
The friends of Mr. Harrison at Philadelphia were greatly shocked to read in the morning papers of the 26th the sad news of his death. He was returning from Paris, where he had visited his three sons. Our New York reporter sends the following particulars: Mr. Harrison died Sunday afternoon, the 22d inst., on the steamship Queen, at 4 :30 p.m., aged sixty-six years. The steamer was out from Liverpool eleven days. His disease was stoppage of the bowels, and his death occurred from simple neglect of this important function. He was perfectly well when he came aboard the vessel and ate his meals regularly, taking his breakfast at table the day of his death. He also took a bath in the bathroom of the steamer the same morning. He was attended by Surgeon Berry, of the steamer, who did all in his power to save him, but he was beyond aid. He died at 4:30 Sunday afternoon, was laid out by the stewardess, and was buried in the deep at 8:15 Monday afternoon, the funeral services being read by Capt. John Milliken. His address?108 Queen street, Germantown,
Philadelphia ?was found in a book in his stateroom. His personal effects are in the hands of Steward Rankin, of the "Queen."

Apollos W. Harrison, the secretary for almost twenty-six years of the Pennsylvania  Horticultural society, has been known to the horticulturists and to all lovers of flower and fruit-growing more widely than almost any officer of such societies in the country, and has long been regarded with peculiar favor and the sincerest friendship. His death will be everywhere regretted, and his unfailing courtesy and especial faithfulness in attending to every duty, will make his memory a pleasure to all who ever came within the circle of his acquaintance.

(Photo from Faulkner Collection Sept. 2012) This is same photo as used in the online obituary >
Mr. Harrison was an enterprising and successful merchant and manufacturer for twenty years before his partial withdrawal from mercantile pursuits in 1861 to attend to the attractive work of his favorite society, although he continued some departments of manufacturing, especially of perfumeries and inks, for some years later. Always an active and public spirited citizen, he was favorably known to the active circles of merchants and citizens who made the Horticultural society most active twenty years ago and more. He accepted the position of secretary on the retirement of Thomas P. James in 1861. From that time forward Mr. Harrison had no duty more thoroughly suited, both to his own tastes and wishes and to the greatest pleasure of the thousands attending the many exhibitions of this very active society. His careful forethought, and unfailing courtesy, made the duties of his position always valuable to those who had occasion to meet with the society, or to participate in any degree in its business. This will be the testimony of thousands from other sections of the country, who have visited Philadelphia on the many occasions of horticultural, pomological or floral exhibitions, and on behalf of the florists of America we but join with the general testimony in making a tribute of respect to the memory of a courteous gentleman and a faithful officer. The sad news was uppermost in the minds of all at Philadelphia on the 26th, and the subject of general conversation with the trade. Mr. Wescott, of Fennock Bros., recalled the incident related by Mr. Harrison at the 25th anniversary of his society work, when he applied to himself the story from Landseer's painting, in which a hunter finds his dog who had fallen from a cliff, and rejoices in saying: "There's life in the old dog yet." Mr. Lorin Blodget, the well-known historian, for thirty years a personal friend of Mr. Harrison, referred to the singular excellence of his character as merchant, manufacturer and officer. Mr. Jos. E. Mitchell, president of the Pennsylvania Horticultural society, was seen, but was too deeply moved by the shock to talk of the matter. He said the feeling of the society would doubtless be emboded in appropriate resolutions at the called meeting on Monday, Aug. 30. President Robert Craig said: "During the twenty-six years of his service he missed but two meetings. He was a gentleman of the old school, distinguished for his courtesy: to one and all be gave the most careful and patient consideration." Mr. Vm. F Dreer said: "He was a critical experimenter in vegetable gardening, seeking the finest strains in cultivation, and greatly interested in all improvements in this direction. Mr. D. S. Heffron, of Chicago, said: "It was at Mr. Harrison's breakfast table that the Early Rose potato was christened, Mr. Harrison himself suggesting the name, to which I readily agreed.
From: The American Florist Sept. 1, 1886

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ RARE VAN VLIET JAR OF 1881

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM THE RALPH MEISSE COLLECTION AND AS YOU CAN SEE IS COMPLETE AS THEY COME. ONLY BEING PRODUCED FOR FOUR YEARS THESE ARE HARD TO COME BY IN ANY CONDITION LET ALONE LIKE THIS GEM. HE ALSO HAS GREAT EXAMPLE OF LYON AND BOSSARD'S JAR ALSO FROM EAST STROUDSBURG PA.   THANKS RALPH FOR SHARING.

By Amy Leiser, Executive Director
Monroe County Historical Association

Monroe County has had its share of individuals who have worked to make life a little better, or easier, for everyone. Warren R. Van Vliet was one such individual. During his inventive career, Van Vliet engineered canning jars that were better able to preserve foods than the other canning jars of his day.

Van Vliet was born in Stroud Township on December 1, 1833 to Charrick and Hannah (Barry) Van Vliet. Warren Van Vliet was the great-great-great grandson of Dirk and Rachel Van Vliet, two of the earliest European settlers of present-day Monroe County. The Van Vliet family was originally from Holland and immigrated to America in 1728. They first settled in Kingston, New York, before moving to Walpack, New Jersey, and then to present-day Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania.

Photo: Warren R. Van Vliet with his great-granddaughter E. Ruth Breitwieser Dunning, in 1920.

Warren Van Vliet served in the Civil War as a recruiter for the Union Army. After the War, Van Vliet returned to a career in Monroe County, working as a teacher. He was a forward-thinking man who was best known for his invention and patent of the Van Vliet canning jar. Patents are, and originally were, intended to exclude people other than the patent-holder from using, developing, or selling an invention. Patents were first granted in America in the late 1790s, and with the onset of the Industrial Revolution, inventions, along with their corresponding patents, became common.

The smallest glass factory in Monroe County manufactured Van Vliet’s canning jars. This factory was located on the Stroudsburg side of the Interborough Bridge (now Veterans Memorial Bridge). Warren Van Vliet partnered with Stroudsburg businessman Jackson Lantz who undoubtedly financed Van Vliet’s canning jar industry.

Van Vliet’s jar design was intended to advance the preservation of fruits and other foods by improving the jar’s seal. His jars were narrow at the top and flared to a wider, more stable bottom. To seal the jars, Van Vliet developed a baling device that wrapped the jars with wire. The wire then secured a yoke-shaped clamp that tightly held the jars’ lids when they were closed, creating an air-tight seal. Van Vliet’s jars came in a variety of sizes from one-half pint to two quarts.

Warren Van Vliet’s patent for his fruit jars was approved on May 3, 1881. The jars are imprinted with either “The Van Vliet Jar of 1881” or “Van Vliet Improved PatD May 3 1881.” Unfortunately, the Van Vliet jars were only made for four years; the factory burned down in 1885, and the storeroom, fasteners and jars were lost. The factory was never rebuilt.

Because the Van Vliet canning jars were only made for a short time, there are very few in existence. The rare Van Vliet canning jars, designed to be functional and beautiful, are a great collector’s item today.

 

PATENT # 241.095. "warren R. Van Vliet, of East Stroudsburg, Pa., for "A fruit-jar."—Application filed 19th February, 1881.

 Warren R. van Vliet, patentee of the famous The Van Vliet Jar of 1881,wrote a letter in 1919 to Ball Bros. about making his jar, he was  from East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania.  He was living there back in 1881 when he got a patent for the jar, but companies bearing his name were located in Boston and Philadelphia.  He never owned a glass factory, just companies that sold his jar. He was trying to revive his fruit jar career.  And no, Ball Brothers never made a jar with a wire that went all the way around the base.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ RARE CROWLEYTOWN MASON # 10
 
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF ERIC GUNN, A REAL GEM AND RARE CROWLEYTOWN MASON LOADED AND I DO MEAN LOADED WITH SEED BUBBLES. CROWLEYTOWN MASONS ARE RARE TO START WITH BUT THIS ONE WITH THE # 10 EMBOSSED UNDER MASON'S IS RARE & UNLISTED.
 
 "Rick, This is a very rare Crowleytown Mason jar. If you are not familiar with these jars they are the earliest form of the Mason's Patent Nov. 30 th 1858 jars and were made soon after the Patent date on the jars and were believed to have been made in Crowleytown, N.J. Thus they are called Crowleytown Mason jars. They Have flat bases and round shoulders unlike the later bullet shaped jars with the same patent date on front. Now Crowleytown jars are hard to find and are a little pricey but this one I have to show you is what I have been told by many advanced jar collectors is the only one known to exist for now and is unlisted in The Red Book Fruit Jar Guide. It has the number 10 below the word Mason's. It might not sound like much but again it is the only known example. There are other Crowleytown jars with numbers below the word Mason's but they are all single digit numbers. This jar is also chock full of thousands of tiny seed bubbles and is very whittled. This jar was dug at a construction site outside of New York City about 5 years ago, Eric"

 
 
 
 
The term Mason jar came from its inventor, John L. Mason. His famous patent was a glass container with a disappearing thread molded into its neck, a zinc lid and rubber seal. This is the famous Mason’s Patent Nov. 30th 1858.
These 1858 jars were produced as late as 1920! The Crowleytown Masons are believed to be the first of the 1858 jars. In 1859, Mason sold five of his patents to Lewis R. Boyd and his company; The Sheet Metal Screw Co. Boyd is most famous for his milk glass liners for the zinc lids. This was important because, for the first time, it separated the metal lid from the contents of the jar. Boyd and Mason were partners for a short time in the Consolidated Fruit Jar Co. Many other companies made their jars. (Clyde Glass Works and Whitney Glass Works were just wo.) One of Mason’s biggest competitors of the time was Salmon B. Rowley. Rowley specialized on lid design and listed every
date possible on his lids and jars. Some of the jars associated with Rowley are Hero, Gem, Pearl, Crystal and Porcelain Lined. Rowley’s idea was a top-sealing jar with a metal or glass lid straddling the ground lip, held down by a zinc band. Jars with stoppers were also popular.

Excerpt from Melissa Milner article, read full article here
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ "SYRACUSE EXCELSIOR SPRINGS"
 
THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF MARK YATES FROM SYRACUSE N.Y..WHAT A GREAT COLOR BOTTLE  AND A VERY HARD ONE TO GET HOLD OF, SYRACUSE EXCELSIOR SPRING. I UNDERSTAND THESE ARE FOUND IN QUART AND PINTS WITH THIS EMBOSS AND A.J. DELATOUR VARIANTS ARE FOUND IN PINT AND HALF PINTS. I AM NOT SURE AS TO WHAT EXTENT A.J. DELATOUR WAS INVOLVED IN OWNERSHIP OF COMPANY OR STRICTLY A DEALER/DISTRIBUTOR  FOR THEM. I FOUND SOME INFORMATION ON IT AND POSTED IT BELOW, THANKS MARK...GREAT STUFF.
 
"This is one of my favorite bottles of any kind. Big gloppy top and whittle, very tough color to find and best of all it is a local bottle. I am always looking for colors I don't have in any of the Syracuse Springs."

MARKS EMAIL

 
EXCELSIOR SPRING. —A saline spring flowing 1.000 gallons per hour, containing 668-24 grains of salts per gallon, of which 584 are sodium chloride, in Syracuse, Onondaga Co., N. Y. A resort.


New York.—Twenty of the thirty-four localities in New York whose waters are on sale report figures for 1885, and one, Cayuga spring, reported the waters as free.

The statistics included in the tables are based on reports from the following: High Rock spring, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga county; Vichy spring, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga county; Champion spouting spring, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga county; Star spring, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga county; Putnam spring, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga county; Union spriug, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga county; Excelsior spring, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga county; Victor spring, Darien Center, Genesee county; Sharon spring, Sharon Springs, Schoharie county; Deep Rock spring, Oswego, Oswego county; Artesian lithia spring, Ballston Spa, Saratoga county; Verona mineral spring, Verona, Oneida county; Diamond Rock spring, Williamson, Wayne county; Nunda mineral spring, Nunda, Livingston county; Massena springs, Massena, Saint Lawrence county; Richfield springs, Richfield Springs, Otsego county; Chlorine springs, Syracuse, Onondaga county; Adirondack springs, White Hall, Washington county; Oak Orchard acid springs, Alabama, Genesee county; Lebanon springs, Lebanon Springs, Columbia county.

Excelsior Spring, Syracuse, Onondaga County. Charles A. Goessman, analyst.  Saline.  Calcium carbonate, grains per gallon 15.24    Calcium sulphate,"" 36.45   Sodium chloride,"" 584.53    Alumina, ) H „ t Q2 Silica, f    Sodium sulphate,"" 13.16   Magnesium chloride,"" 17-69   Magnesium bromide,"" 0.15   Free carbonic acid present.   Total grains per gallon 668.24
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ RARE,  DR. H.A. STRUBLES KIDNEY CURE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF EDWARD D. NIKLES AND WHAT A NICE CURE THIS IS. I FOUND SOME INFORMATION ON IT AND POSTED IT ALONG WITH AN OLD AD, THANKS ED...GREAT STUFF.
 
  
 
The Struble Kidney and Liver Cure Company was incorporated in 1890, having a capital stock of $50,000. The object of the company was and is to furnish to suffering humanity a prompt and sure cure for diseases of the kidneys and liver. The medicine prepared is the same as used for fifteen years by Dr. H. A. Struble in his professional work. The incorporators of the company were Hanford Struble, H. N. Huntington, James Spicer, Henry Sherman, Fred U. Swarts, M. B. Shaw, and H. A. Struble. The officers are, Fred U. Swarts, president; M. B. Shaw, vice-president; H. C. Sherman, secretary; H. N. Huntington, treasurer; and H. A. Struble, general manager.
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ A PAIR..OF RARE GREEN MOUNTAIN RENOVATORS
THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE IMPRESSIVE COLLECTION OF MICHAEL GEORGE, SMITHS GREEN MOUNTAIN RENOVATOR IN IT'S EARLIEST FORMS. NOTING THE TWO DIFFERENT LIP APPLICATIONS APPLIED ON THESE VERY RARE BOTTLES. I HAVE ALWAYS LIKED THE BOTTLES FROM SILAS SMITH. THANK YOU MICHAEL, GREAT GLASS ! HERE IS A LINK TO HIS SITE...CHECK IT OUT.  BOTTLESHOW.COM
 
 
THE PRICE CUTTING PROBLEM.

St. Albans, Vt., June ix. 1902.

Your issue of April 23rd contains a very interesting article from the pen of Pert M. Moses of the Omega Chemical Company. His letter to you says: "What I have written will perhaps stimulate some discussion and lead to an eventual solution of the price cutting problem. We don't sell to retailers. We sell only to jobbers."

The methods employed in marketing Smith's Green Mountain Renovator are directly opposite to those outlined by Mr. Moses, and as our scheme was inaugurated purely and simply to stop the cutting of prices, it occurs to me that some of your readers may find a short dissertation upon it of interest. If you agree with me. I should appreciate your giving it space in your medium. Yours truly, St. Albans Remedy Co., Farrand S. Stranahan. Mgr.

Vinol and Smith's Green Mountain Renovator are the only dollar remedies extensively advertised upon the special agency plan. The company which I replesent began business by introducing the Renovator on the open market. The inevitable cutting of prices and substitution followed, with the result that after an experience of two years, our preparation was taken off from the open market and is now sold only to one druggist in each city and town. This special agent is under guarantee, in writing, to maintain the price of $1.00 per bottle for the Renovator; is privileged to sell other druggists in his city at the same price as formerly asked by the jobber, providing that a druggist so buying signs a similar contraot to that of our agent, i. e., guaranteeing to maintain the price of $ 1.00 per bottle for the Renovator; is privihged to sell other druggists in his city at the same price as formerly asked by the jobber, providing that a druggist so buying signs a similar contract to that of our agent, i e., guaranteeing to maintain the price. Every package of goods which leaves this factory is so marked that it is absolutely impossible for an agent or other drug

fist to alter it so that we can not trace rom whom it was obtained. By contract a heavy fine is levied on an agent violating any part of the agreement. This, in outline, is the method under which Smith's Green Mountain Renovator is sold to the trade.

It is my opinion that Vinol and ourselves are pioneers in a method which will be generally followed within ten >ears, providing some solution of the price cutting problem is not evolved. The whole matter- rests, it seems to me, with the manufacturers. If they can put up their goods and mark them in such a way as will enable them, under all circumstances, to trace them, and then if they obtain from the jobber a written agreement not to supply the goods, either directly or indirectly, to any party who will not maintain the full purchase price, I think the problem would be solved.

There are some articles which are undoubtedly more difficult than others to number or mark with some special sign. I can only speak for the Renovator, but this I again assert: no one, unless they absolutely destroy our package, can obliterate our tracer. ~ To stop the cutting of prices I suggest these four methods:

1st. The manufacturer must mark each package of his goods so that it can be traced.

2nd- The jobber must contract in writing not to supply any person who is not a legitimate dealer and who will not maintain the purchase price of the article.

3rd. The retailer when purchasing from the jobber must guarantee in writing to maintain the price and not supply the cutter.

4th. For any violation on the part of the wholesaler or retailer of their agreements, the manufacturers having adopted this method shall black list such wholesaler or retailer and refuse thereafter to supply them with their products, and not allow other wholesalers or retailers to supply them.

This scheme, though roughly sketched, I believe is the key to the situation.

IT WAS DESERVED.
The Edcell Company.  13th and Hamilton streets.  Philadelphia, June 18, 1902.
 
Testimonial 
"Gentlemen :—I am not desirous of troubling you, but feel it my duty to write that your wonderful Smith's Green Mountain Renovator cured our little girl, who was a helpless cripple, suffering intensely for live years. At the age of five years our child had a severe fall which, the doctors said, had caused intrusion of the bone.

For four years we employed the most skilful physicians in this section, till there were four running sores, from the size of a twenty-five-cent piece to that of a silver dollar, with several smaller ones appearing from time to time, making the leg from the knee to the ankle a mass of sores, and discharging a great many small bones; one which I now have is three inches in length and one inch wide.

After failing to find any physician or remedy to help our daughter, we interviewed one of the leading physicians of the State, who claimed she would have to undergo an operation, which would cost us two hundred dollars. About this time we were fortunate enough to hear of a parallel case where Smith's Green Mountain Renovator effected a cure after physicians had given up.

I at once bought a bottle of our druggist, Mr. Sheldon, who said he had sold it for forty years with remarkable success. After our child had taken a few bottles she began to regain her strength, and the sores gradually disappeared until she was entirely cured. For the last three years she has enjoyed good health and has regained the use of her leg entirely.

Hoping that others may be blessed, as we have been, by using Smith's Green Mountain Renovator,

I remain very respectfully,"

(Signed) Mks. Claka E. Holden.
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ RARE SWAIM'S PANACEA, PHILADA.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF STEVEN JAMES ANDERSON, SWAIM'S PANACEA PHILADELPHIA. I HAVE ALWAYS LIKED THESE BOTTLES AND THIS IS A KILLER EXAMPLE OF IT. I FOUND SOME INFO AND POSTED IT BELOW, THANKS STEPHEN.

On or about March 11, 1913, from the State of Missouri into the State of New York, of a quantity of “Swaim’s Panacea” which was misbranded. This article was labeled: (On wrapper) “ Serial No. 644. Guaranteed by James F. Ballard under the Food and Drugs Act, June 30, 1906. Refuse imitations. See that the name Swaim ends with M. Swaim’s Panacea 4} Per Cent Alcohol 31-100 Grain Salicylic Acid per

 

Ounce. Druggists Take Notice. The directions for using are pasted on the bottle. Our Trade Marks are registered and we will prosecute to the full extent of the law, any one infringing or copying them. Price Two Dollars Prepared only by Swaim’s Laboratory James F. Ballard Proprietor. St. Louis, Missouri, U. S. A. A Remedy. Of value in constitutional or deep-seated diseases of the Blood. This remedy has been in constant use for nearly a century. It was first put up in the form

of a prepared medicine by Wm. Swaim in the year 1820. It has never been a heavily advertised preparation. Its continued popularity and

general use through all these years is due entirely to its demonstrated power and efficacy in eradicating those obstinate blood diseases (inherited or acquired) which exercise guch a destructive influence on the constitution and vitality. Its long and successful record in the treatment of these terrible diseases should be suffidgnt pl-00f of its merit. Special Notice. The business of Swaim’s Laboratory was

purchased by James F. Ballard, from Elisa Battanchon Swaim. and moved from Staten Island, N. Y., to St. Louis, l\Io., October 23, 1900. The genuine Swaim’s Panacea prepared after October 22, bears this imprint. Swaim‘s for every Disease of the Blood Panacea. Swaim’s Laboratory was established in Philadelphia by Wm. Swaim in 1820 nearly a century ago. It has stood the test of time. The same standard of quality is maintained to-day as was established by its founder. Swaim’s Laboratory. James F. Ballard, Proprietor 500-502 North Second St. St. Louis, Mo. U. S. A. Used with Success in the following Diseases: Scrofula, Eczema, Syphilis, Chancre, Catarrh, Blood Poisoning, Pulmonary Diseases, Weak Lungs, Influenza, Chronic Coughs, Anaemia, Ulcers, Carbuncles, Boils, White Swelling, Ache, Pimples, Blotches on the Face, Poison Oak and Ivy. Swelling Of the Knee Or Hip Joint, Ulcerated Mouth or Throat, Disease of the Spine, Diseases of The Bones, Coxalgia, Copper Colored Spots On the Body, Nervousness, Debilitated Constitution, Sciatica and Neuralgia. It is Especially Beneficial in Acute or Chronic Rheumatism.” (On bottle) “Swaim’s Contains 45% Alcohol 31-100 Grains Sylicylic acid to the ounce Prepared by Swaim's Laboratory James F. Ballard, Prop., St. Louis,—Missouri Panacea.” (On back) “ Directions :—For Adults: Two tablespoonfuls twice a day after meals for the first ten days, then take the dose three times a day. Children 2 to 5 years 10 to 15 drops, 6 to 12 years a teaspoonful, 13 to 18 years a tablespoonful. Avoid liquors. Keep the bowels open with Herrick’s Pills.” (Blown in bottle) “Trade Mark Swaim's Panacea Established 1820 St. Louis, Mo.” The circular or pamphlet accompanying the article contained, among other things, the following: “ Swaim's Panacea for DeepSeated or Constitutional Diseases of the Blood,” “Swaim's Panacea is effective in all diseases of the blood, including any disease that is directly dependent on a diseased or impure state of the blood. The following is a partial list of them being those which occur most frequently :—Scrofula, Syphilis, Eczema, Chronic Catarrh, Chancre, Poison Oak and Ivy, Acne, Amemia, Ulcers. White Swelling, Swelling of the Knee, or Hip Joint, Copper Colored Spots on the surface of the body, Influenza and Pulmonary Diseases, Ulcerated mouth or throat, Boils, Carbuncles, Rheumatism, Sciatica, Contagious Blood Poisoning, Coxalgia and Disease of the Spine. Whenever the blood is at fault Swaim’s Panacea is the remedy. It reaches down even to hereditary taints, drives out the poison, cleanses and vitalizes the weak, polluted blood and brings about healthful conditions,” “Swaim’s Panacea is a remedy of great efficacy in long-standing Rheumatic diseases, Eruptions of the skin White Swelling, Diseases of the Bones, or those of an Uicerous Character. It is particularly useful in the chronic nervous complaints occurring in debilitated constitutions. In incipient or chronic Catarrh it is invaluable. Catarrhal affections find a fertile field for development only where the blood is poor and lacking in vital constituents. In such cases the constitution must be built up and the vitality of the system restored before the disease can be eradicated, for which purpose Swaim‘s Panacea will be found most effectual. All those who are predisposed to pulmonary complaints or lung diseases oi! which consumption is the chief, asthmatic affections or those who have inherited or acquired Syphilitic poison in the blood, and whose health is broken down by the use of mercury, arsenic or quinine will find in S\vaim's Panacea the help they need to shake oflf disease or the evil effects of these powerful drugs. In complicated cases of Scrofula and in cases where the virus of the parent has caused a development of Scrofula in the child it is all-powerful in eradicating the poisons which are lurking in the blood," “It possesses a further valuable quality in that it so acts on the blood as to bring it back to its original purity, strength and quality.”
Alcohol (per cent by volume) ________________________ __ 4.8
Solids (per cent)_ ___________________________________ __ 62,3
Sucrose (per cent) __________________________________ __ 58,5
Ash (per cent)__ ____________________________________ _._ 0.38
Salicylic acid (gram per 100 cc) ______________________ __ 0. 10
Alkaloids (gram per 100 cc) _________________________ __ 0.005
Potassium ______________________ __' ___________________ __ Present.
lodids __________________ __' ___________________________ __ Absent.
Sarsaparilla _________________________________________ __ Present.


Misbranding of the article was alleged in the information for the reason that the following statements regarding the therapeutic or curative effects thereof. appearing on the label aforesaid, to wit; “A Remedy. Of value in constitutional or deep-seated diseases of the Blood," “ Its continued popularity * * *
is due entirely to its demonstrated power and efliciency in eradicating these obstinate blood diseases (inherited or acquired),” “Swaim’s Panacea for every disease of the blood,” “Used with success, in the following Diseases: Scrofuia, Eczema, Syphilis, Chancre, Catarrh, Blood Poisoning, Pulmonary Diseases, Weak Lungs, Influenza, ' * " Anxemia, Ulcers, Carbuncles, ' ‘ ' White Swelling " * * Disease of the Spine, Diseases of the Bones, Coxalgia, Copper Colored Spots on the Body, * * * Sciatica and Neuraigia," and included in the circular or pamphlet aforesaid, to wit, “ Swaim’s Panacea for Deep-Seated or Constitutional Diseases of the Blood," “ Swaim’s Panacea is effective in all diseases of the blood, including any disease that is directly dependent on a diseased or impure state of the blood. The following is a partial list of them being those which occur most frequently :—Scrofula, Syphilis, Eczema, Chronic Catarrh, Chancre, * * * Anaemia, Ulcers, White Swelling, ‘ ' * Copper Colored Spots on the surface of the body, Influenza and Pulmonary Diseases, * * * Carbuncles, " * * Sciatica, * * * Coxalgia and Disease of the Spine. Whenewfer the blood is at fault Swaim‘s Panacea is the remedy. It reaches down even to hereditary taints, drives out the poison, cleanses and vitalizes the weak, polluted blood and brings about healthful conditions,” “ Swaim’s Panacea is a remedy of great efficiency in * * * White Swelling, Diseases of the Bones * * '. In incipient or chronic Catarrh it is invaluable. Catarrhal affections find a fertile field for development only where the blood is poor and lacking in vital constituents. In such cases the constitution must be built up and the vitality of the system restored before the disease can be eradicated, for which purpose Swaim‘s Panacea will be found most effectual. All those who are predisposed to pulmonary complaints or lung diseases of 'which consumption is the chief, asthmatic affections or those who have inherited or acquired Syphllitic poison in the blood, and whose health is broken down by the use of mercury, arsenic or quinine will find in Swaim‘s Panacea the help they need to shake off disease "' "' - '. In complicated cases of Scrofula and in cases where the virus of the parent has caused a development of Scrofula in the child it is all-powerful in eradicating the poisons which are lurking in the blood,” “It possesses a further valuable quality in that it so acts on the blood as to bring it back to its original purity, strength and quality," were false and fraudulent in that the game were applied to the article knowingly, and in reckless and wanton disregard of their truth or falsity, so as to represent falsely and fraudulently to the purchasers thereof, and create in the minds of purchasers thereof the impression and belief, that it was, in whole or in part, composed of, or contained, ingredients or medicinal agents effective, among other things, as a remedy and panacea for constitutional or deep-seated diseases of the blood; as a panacea in all diseases of the blood, including any disease directly dependent on a diseased or impure state of the blood, in eradicating obstinate blood diseases inherited or acquired; as a panacea for every disease of the blood; for the treatment of catarrh; for the treatment of and cure of scrofula, eczema, syphilis, chancre, blood poisoning. pulmonary diseases, weak lungs, influenza, anemia, ulcers, carbuncles, white swelling, disease of the spine, diseases of the bones, coxalgia, copper-colored spots on the body, sciatica, and neuralgia; as a cure for chronic catarrh; as a remedy for hereditary taints; for the relief of incipient and chronic catarrh, pulmonary complaints, and lung diseases consumption, asthmatic aifections, and inherited or acquired syphilitic poisoning of the blood; as a remedy in complicated cases of scrofula and in cases where the virus of the parent has caused a development of scrofula in the child; and effective in so acting on the blood as to bring it back to its original purity, strength, and quality, when, in truth and in fact, it was not, in whole or in part, composed of, and did not contain, such ingredients or medicinal agents.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ RARE J.M. ROSEBERRY SODA , ALEXANDRIA VA.
THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK AGAIN COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF TOM LEVEILLE FROM NEWPORT NEWS, VIRGINIA.WHY?..WELL LOOK AT IT, FRESH FROM A PRIVY IN VIRGINIA AND A VERY SOUGHT AFTER BOTTLE IN DEED. ATTRIBUTED TO THE BALTIMORE GLASS WORKS, BALTIMORE MD. DATING TO 1845~60 RANGE. I AM IN PROCESS OF FINDING MORE INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY OF J.M. ROSEBERRY, ALEXANDRIA VIRGINIA AND WILL POST AS I FIND IT.  TOM AND FRIENDS DUG THIS IN A 6 FOOT WIDE 22 FOOT DEEP PIT IN VIRGINIA THIS PAST WEEKEND. GREAT FIND GUYS.
 
HERE IS SOME INFO TOM MANAGED TO FIND FOR ME...THANKS TOM.
 
***********************************
 
"John M. Roseberry born NJ 1802
February 1855 article Washington post, dissolving partnership with "& co"

Married Mary Anne Conway
Advertised soda & ale.
1862 article in Alexandria gazette soda bottling business was for sale, and sold 1863 by default due to unpaid taxes.last known census information ~ 1869 corner of king & payne st Alexandria Virginia bottling sarsaparilla campasium crab cider draft ale by the half barrel"
 
  MR. ROSEBERRY IS BURIED IN HUFFORD CEMETERY IN PULASKI VIRGINIA.
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK A SUPER COLOR PETER STUMPF & CO. ~ RICHMOND,VA.
THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF TOM LEVEILLE FROM NEWPORT NEWS, VIRGINIA. A  RARE PETER STUMPF & CO IN A SUPER COLOR. THESE ARE HARD TO GET HOLD OF AS I HAVE BEEN HUNTING ONE FOR QUITE SOME TIME AND WHEN THEY DO COME UP FOR SALE THEY COMMAND GOOD MONEY, GREAT BOTTLE TOM. THANKS FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE IT, I HAVE ADDED SOME INFORMATION AND PICTURES TIED TO MR. STUMPF.
 
 
 
Peter Stumpf, born in the city of Offenbach Germany, May 10, 1841, died in Richmond, Virginia, in 1903. He immigrated to the United States when eighteen years of age, and after making his home in New York City, there became connected with a brewing concern. As a wealthy entrepreneur of his age, he often had to entertain his brewery clients at hotels in New York, the equivalent of media moguls of today showing off their casinos in Las Vegas hotels. After moving to Richmond, Virginia, he was for many years proprietor and operator of the Home Brewery, Stumpf  was apparently a better manager than his predecessors as his brewery became a success.  The brewery had franchises in Petersburg, Newport News, and Phoebus, Virginia as well as Raleigh, North Carolina.  They also owned numerous saloons in Richmond, which was normal for breweries of the period.  So called "tied" bars sold only their parent company's products.  In 1897 Stumpf retired leaving his successors with a successful company.  He died in 1903.  Renamed the Home Brewing Company, it had a brewing capacity of between 25,000 to 30,000 barrels a year.  However, even though the brewery bearing his name was changed to the Home Brewing Company, the new owners left the initials "PS" on the barrel on their logo to honor Stumpf.  The only competing brewery (Richmond Brewery) produced only 12,000 to 14,000 barrels a year.  The Home Brewery continued their earlier success in the early 20th century appealing to local pride.  In 1903 George Bernier became brewmaster.  Bernier would remain with the company through Prohibition and repeal.  In the 1950s his son would take over as brewmaster. withdrawing from this line to open a cold storage plant, of which he was owner at the time of his death. He was a Democrat in politics, affiliated with the Improved Order of Heptasophs, and held membership in the Roman Catholic church, to which his children belong, although his widow is a communicant of St. John's Lutheran Church.
 
 
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
 

Peter Stumpf married, in Richmond, Virginia, December 12, 1896, Hermine, born in Richmond, Virginia, March 4, 1866, daughter of Otto and Marie (Meeke) Morgenstern. Otto Morgenstern was born in the Duchy of Brunswick, Germany, his father, Henry, having been at one time secretary to the ruler of the Duchy, and a prominent personage in that locality. Henry Morgenstern had seven children, three of whom are now living in Germany. Otto Morgenstern was born December 22, 1828, died July 14. 1899; when a young man he came to Virginia, settling in Richmond, where he was for forty-five years proprietor of a cafe at Broad and Fourth streets, and where his death occurred. His wife, Marie (Meeke) Morgenstern, was a native of Hanover, Germany, and of their six children three survive: Rosalie, married a Mr. Krause; Emily, married a Mr. Seelinger; Hermine, of previous mention, married Peter Stumpf. Mrs. Stumpf resides at No. 2336 West Grace street, Richmond, with her three children, one, Marie, having died July 14, 1903. The others: Otto, born January 27, 1897; Peter, born February 18, 1898; Dorothy, born April 9, 1903.
 
 
 The Richmond Brewing Company, Mr. Peter Stumpf, President, had a large and very attractive float, with elaborate decorations. There was a pyramid of bottles, with a large eagle at the top, and an abundant display of Home Beer and crates, barrels, etc.
 
 Peter Stumpf, president of the Merchants' Cold Storage
and Ice Co., Richmond, Va., died at his home in that city January 27th, 1903, at the age of fifty-two. He was a native of Germany and came to Richmond about 1869 or 1870. For some years he was connected with the brewing industry, but when the Merchants' Cold Storage and Ice Co. was formed he was elected its president.
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  RARE T.P. MEYER, MONT CLAIR N.J.

 

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF CONNOR RUSH FROM GLEN RIDGE NEW JERSEY, A RARE VARIANT AND FAVORITE OF CONNORS FROM T.P. MEYER & COMPANY, MONT CLAIR N.J. WITH EMBOSSED ROOSTER.

 

I CAN UNDERSTAND WHY THIS IS A FAVORITE BEING A COLLECTOR OF PICTURE BLOBS MYSELF, THIS IS THE ONLY BLOB I HAVE SEEN THAT HAS A ROOSTER EMBOSSED ON IT. A VERY COOL BOTTLE CONNOR, THANKS FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE YOUR GREAT FIND.

 

 

 "Rick, this is my favorite local bottle. Also my favorite bottle I've dug. Very rare. Thomas P. Meyer was in business at 345 Bloomfield Ave. from 1895-1896. George Greason bought him out, and I suspect continued to use all of Meyer's old equipment. Meyer was a real estate agent, (see ad below) then a bottler for a short time, then he became a clerk at the Caldwell Penitentiary. I have a lot of blobs and crowns from him. I have only seen a couple other examples of this rooster blob though, naturally they are rare, having been used for such a short time."

 
 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK DR. KILMER'S OCEAN WEED HEART REMEDY

 THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF DAVE KAM FROM WILSON NEW YORK AND IS A VERY PRIZED BOTTLE TO KILMER'S COLLECTORS I KNOW. I HAVE DUG PARTS OF THIS BOTTLE BUT YET TO LAND A WHOLE ONE, AS SHOWN DAVE ALSO HAS THE TRADE CARD TO GO ALONG WITH IT. NICE....I ADDED SOME MORE INFORMATION. THANKS DAVE, GREAT STUFF.

 

 

The Kilmers of Binghamton, New York
~ By  John E. Golley 1997, Email:   ByGolley@email.msn.com

 This is the history of a family, a "patent medicine" company and ultimately, of a city. The Kilmer family started out in the small village of Cobleskill, New York and through several generations, influenced the health and politics of the city of Binghamton and made their mark upon the world.....this is their story.

Dr. Sylvester Andral Kilmer, MD was born in Cobleskill, New York on December 19, 1840, one of eleven children of Daniel and Maria Shaver Kilmer. He attended the log school in Cobleskill, the Schoharie Academy and then the Warnerville and Richmondville Seminaries. At the age of eighteen, he entered the office of Dr. Scott, a prominent Allopathic physician in Schoharie County. Wishing to get away from the "one school" idea, he then studied with Dr. Downing who had been called the successful pioneer of Homeopathy in the Schoharie region of New York State. Dr. S. Andral Kilmer started his own practice of medicine as county physician at Barnerville, Schoharie County. Following through with the idea of a broad acquaintance with medicine and surgery, he studied Eclectic and Botanic Practice with Dr. Patrick of Wisconsin. He attended the preliminary and regular course of the Bellevue Hospital and Medical College in New York City, where he had instruction at the Eye and Ear Infirmary on Blackwell's Island and other hospitals. He also received a special practical course at the Philadelphia Lying-In-Charity Hospital, where he received instruction in Practical Obstetrics and Diseases of Women; he also received similar instruction at the Central Dispensary of Chicago. He received further instruction at the Philadelphia School of Operative Surgery under the special tutelage of the noted physician Dr. D. Hayes Agnew and he also had a diploma from the Bennett Medical College of Chicago. After a successful tour of medical lectures and practice in the West, he settled in Binghamton, New York.   In Binghamton, he was first employed in visiting Binghamton and the surrounding cities on advertised days, in which practice Dr. Kilmer was so famous and successful that he was soon enabled to begin erection of his Laboratory buildings for the preparation of his remedies, which became necessary to supply the ever increasing demand. In 1878 his brother, Jonas Kilmer, moved to Binghamton to run the business end of the proprietary medicine business, and in 1892, Jonas bought out Dr. S. Andral Kilmer's share of the business. Their first major laboratory and manufacturing plant was located at the corners of Chenango and Virgil Streets in Binghamton. Dr. Kilmer prepared many different medicines, some of which were Dr. Kilmer's Ocean Weed Heart Remedy, Female Remedy, Indian Cough and Consumption Cure, Autumn Leaf Extract, U & O Ointment and Prompt Parilla Pills, but the most well known remedy was Dr. Kilmer's Swamp Root Kidney Liver and Bladder Cure. Swamp Root contained Buchu leaves, Oil of Juniper, Oil of Birch, Colombo Root, Swamp-Sassafras, Balsam Copaiba, Balsam Tolu, Skullcap leaves, Venice Turpentine, Valerian Root, Rhubarb Root, Mandrake Root, Peppermint herb, Aloes, Cinnamon and sugar and contained approximately 9 to 10-1/2% alcohol.  In the years prior to Dr. Kilmer's sale of his interest in the proprietary medicine business, during its growth and increasing professional services, Dr. Kilmer kept looking for a place which included the peculiar properties required and known only to him. He located such a place in Osborne Hollow, situated approximately ten miles east of Binghamton, where there was a sulpho-phosphate spring. He induced the townspeople to rename the area Sanitaria Springs and at a cost of $100,000 he built a Sanitarium and Hydrotherapium in 1892. The outside grounds were a well-arranged system of natural parks and the buildings contained every modern convenience of their time including electric lights, steam heaters and elevators. In addition to the sulpho-phosphate spring, there were ten others including the Blue Lithia, Red Iron, Black Magnetic and Ferro-Manganese. All types of baths were in use summer and winter, including Sulphur, Turkish, Russian and Electric. Dr. Kilmer's son Ulysses was employed as Associate Superintendent and a daughter, Edith, was the Librarian. Another of Dr. S. Andral's brothers, Andrew G. Kilmer, gave up his life work as a teacher ( He had been Associate Principal of the Schoharie Academy, Vice-President of the Franklin Institute, Principal of the grade school in Cobleskill and Principle of the Academy in Bainbridge, New York. He also organized the academy in Schenevus, with much success.) and entered the business office of Dr. Kilmer and Company and later, was the Assistant Superintendent of the Sanitarium. Andrew Kilmer was my maternal grandmother, Alice Cooper Kisselburgh's great-grandfather. She and her sister used to visit him and Uncle Sylvester at the sanitarium in the summer when they were young. It was also around this time that Dr. S. Andral Kilmer began formally treating patients for cancer, both at the Sanitarium and also at his Cancertorium at 254 Conklin Avenue in Binghamton. He advertised his cancer cure nationally and would pay train fare to the Sanitarium upon commitment of a stay of three to six months to effect the cure. He advocated a homeopathic approach to the treatment of this disease , which involved a controlled diet, treatment with the different springs as well as a secret medicine which, after a time, would cause the cancer to be expelled from the body; they would literally fall off. My grandmother and her sister had both been witness to these treatments and witnessed the results first-hand, and swore that they had seen the eradications occur. Dr. Kilmer was decidedly against plasters, radium, x-rays and surgery on these cancers as he felt that not only did they injure the patient, but they caused the cancers to be harder to treat and might even cause them to spread. At this period of time in Binghamton, there was a very heated clash between the traditional medical doctors and the homeopathic doctors; they wouldn't even work in the same hospitals together. Dr. Kilmer had been trained in both practices, but leaned more toward the homeopathic and allopathic teachings. This fact, as well as his ties to the proprietary medicine business, keep him under constant scrutiny by the "old school" doctors of his time. His assertions of having a cure for [graphic]cancer, which they felt was impossible given his methods, made him the brunt of ridicule by his colleagues. He offered to share his knowledge in the non-surgical treatment of cancer with them, according to conversations his daughter Hattie Marguerite had with my grandmother, but was his help was refused and rebuffed, and he was so professionally ridiculed by his colleagues, that he took the secrets of his "cure" to his grave. The patients who were treated by Dr. Kilmer held him in high esteem, and he was treating patients three days before his death of a cerebral hemorrhage. He died in his home at 44 Beethoven Street in Binghamton on January 14, 1924. Whether or not he had a cure for cancer is open to conjecture - my grandmother and her sister would both state a resolute yes, however, testimonials and the like, especially of that era, quite often are at best questionable; my only thought is...what if?  Dr. S. Andral Kilmer and Jonas M. Kilmer had two other brothers who were also in business for themselves. Augustus Kilmer established the Kilmer Manufacturing Company in Newburgh, New York which manufactured baling ties and wire fencing. Another brother, Thomas J. Kilmer, was a physician in Schoharie, New York and several old bottles embossed with his name are known to exist.  Jonas M. Kilmer was also born in Cobleskill, New York on April 11, 1843. He was a graduate of the Bryant and Stratton Business College in Albany, after which he worked for a year in the general store of Joseph Taylor of Schoharie Court House, and then worked the next eighteen years in the mercantile business in New York City with several different firms, rising to important positions. His brother convinced him to move to Binghamton in 1881 where he ran the business end of the "patent medicine" business as an equal partner. In 1892 he bought out Dr. S. Andral Kilmer's interest in the company, though some would say he "swindled" his brother in the deal; the purchase price is unknown. Jonas' son, Willis Sharpe Kilmer became the Head of Advertising for the company, and business began to increase rapidly. The company was incorporated in 1909 as Dr. Kilmer & Company and had branch offices in New York, Chicago, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil and Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies. In 1899, Jonas Kilmer was elected Director of The People's Bank of Binghamton, in which capacity he served from October 2, 1899 until February 9, 1907, at which time he was elected President; he served in this capacity until his death. On December 4, 1907 he was chosen as a trustee of Binghamton Savings Bank and also served as President of the Binghamton Press from 1904 until his death. People's Bank merged with Broome County Trust Company on April 20, 1914 and became People's Trust Company. From 1893 to 1908, Jonas Kilmer also served as a member of the Board of Police Commissioners. Jonas Kilmer died in Binghamton in 1912, but not without first giving all the credit of the success of the family business to his son, Willis Sharpe Kilmer.  Willis Sharpe Kilmer was born in Brooklyn, New York on October 18, 1869. He graduated from Cornell University in 1880 and went to work in the family business. Willis was put in charge of the advertising department of Dr. Kilmer and Company, which lead to a swift increase in business. Advertising in the late 1800's was not the "science" that it is today and Willis Sharpe Kilmer was one of advertising's earliest pioneers. His first wife was Beatrice Richardson who's socially prominent father was one of the brightest executives in a fledgling newspaper advertising agency in New York City. Willis Kilmer had a more metropolitan upbringing than many of his peers and his relationship with Mr. Richardson and his family connections all helped benefit Willis and his new ideas. Dr. Kilmer and Company utilized all the forms of advertising of the day including painted wooden signs, posters and printed circulars, but with the entrance of Willis' leadership, began purchasing ad space in newspapers expounding the virtues of their numerous cures and they were amongst the fore-runners in printing Almanacs, which not only would list the normal items such as moon phases, best planting times and the like, but at every turn of the page, listed one or more of the products, printed testimonials for the same and helped diagnose "ailments" of which one of their products would "cure". The packaging of their products was also easily noticed on the shelf. For ease of finding the correct cure, their Heart Remedy had an embossed heart on it, Swamp Root Kidney Cure had a kidney embossed on it and so forth, and their packaging was bright orange with the likeness of a whiskered Dr. S. Andral Kilmer printed boldly on the front. The package also invited customers to write to Dr. Kilmer for advise and prescription, which, long after Dr. S. Andral Kilmer had sold his share of the business, caused Dr. Kilmer to initiate a lawsuit against his brother and nephew in which he accused Dr. Kilmer and Company of representing him as the physician in charge of their medical department and also, that they pretended to give medical advice and prescribe medicines for diseases which they pretended to diagnose. When a lower court ruled against Dr. Kilmer and Company, Willis pursued the suit in The Appellate Court, and in 1917, the decision against the company was reversed. It was Willis Sharpe Kilmer's advertising prowess as well as his "muscle" via political and professional contacts that made Swamp Root a household word. When other patent medicines were losing popularity due to The Pure Food and Drug Act as well as an increased respect for medical science, Swamp Root was still filling the Kilmer coffers. When asked what Swamp Root was good for, Willis Kilmer once replied, "About a million dollars a year!". Patent medicine wasn't the only thing Willis Sharp Kilmer was involved in. On April 11, 1904, Mr. Kilmer founded The Binghamton Press, which became a very well-respected newspaper in the country. It has been alleged, although never proven, that he started the newspaper for the purpose of putting The Binghamton Evening Herald out of business and he could also control the advertising of various patent medicines and any articles condemning the same. There were several people such as Samuel Hopkins Adams, who were very much against patent medicines and were lobbying very hard for the passage of The Pure Food and Drug Act. Mr. Kilmer was very successful in "squashing" their stories and did eventually put The Evening Herald, run by his long-time personal and political enemy Guy Beardsley, out of business. Mr. Beardsley later sued Willis Sharpe Kilmer charging conspiracy to put him out of business; Beardsley lost the suit.  Willis Sharpe Kilmer was also a very fine judge of horses. The family mansion is still located on Riverside Drive in Binghamton, and on the surrounding grounds, Mr. Kilmer built Sun Briar Court, which had a 1/5 mile indoor track, an outdoor track connected to a half-mile circular track, 100 fire-proof stalls and the main stable included offices, quarters and a clubhouse. The Kilmer racing colors were brown, green and orange and he owned many fine horses; Genie- the son of Man O' War, Sun Briar, Sun Beau and Exterminator, which won the 1918 Kentucky Derby and was the leading money winner for four straight seasons. Sun Beau held the American record for money won until Sea Biscuit broke the record in 1939. Mr. Kilmer owned a large estate on the Rappahannock River in Virginia known as Remlik (Kilmer spelled backwards) as well as a game preserve near Binghamton called Sky Lake and he was a pioneer in forest and game preservation in New York as well as Virginia. He established the Kilmer Pathological Laboratory in Binghamton and started Binghamton's first nine hole golf course, which later became the Binghamton Country Club. Willis Sharpe Kilmer died of pneumonia on July 12, 1940 leaving an estate estimated at $10 to $15 million dollars, and is interred in the family mausoleum in Floral Park Cemetery in Binghamton, New York. After World War II, his second wife, Sarah Jane Wells, sold the rights to make and manufacture Swamp Root to Medtech Laboratories of Cody, Wyoming. The eight story Kilmer Building, built in 1902 after the original building was damaged by fire, still stands at 141 Chenango Street and Swamp Root was still on the shelves of the E. C. McKallor Drug Company in Binghamton in 1983 - it can still be ordered today, more than almost 120 years after it was first produced, a testament to the advertising skill of Willis Sharpe Kilmer and the strength of the Kilmer name and reputation.


BIBLIOGRAPHY
Binghamton and Broome County, New York, Volumes I, II and III, The Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1924  Broome County Historical Society Newsletter, Spring 1982  The Binghamton Press, June 30, 1983  The Sunday Press, July 24, 1983  The Binghamton Press, July 13, 1940  The Binghamton Press, January 14, 1924  The History of the Kilmer Family In America, Rev. C. H. Kilmer, 1897  Lost Landmarks of Broome County, New York, Marjory Barnum Hinman, 1983  One For A Man, Two For A Horse, Gerald Carson, 1961  Willis Sharpe Kilmer's Use of Advertising in the Promotion of Swamp Root, Annette Bakic, 1981  Dr. Kilmer's Swamp Root Almanac, 1930  Dr. Kilmer's Swamp Root Almanac, 1941  Dr. Kilmer's Red Book of Hope  Valley of Opportunity

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  RARE MARSH & FORD COFFIN FLASK
 
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS A RARE COFFIN FLASK FROM MARSH & FORD LIQUORS & CIGARS 300 WEST 3RD STREET LEADVILLE COLORADO AND COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF MIKE HOLZWARTH AND AS HE SAYS, IT IS A FAVORITE. THIS IS  RARE BIRD AND I CAN UNDERSTAND THE ATTACHMENT. MIKE WAS KIND ENOUGH TO SEND ME SOME GREAT INFORMATION AND I HAVE ADDED IT, THANK YOU MIKE FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE IT.
 
 
 
 
 ‎Here you are Rick. I dug this about 6 years ago.A half pint coffin whiskey. Its my best bottle in the collection, only two other known specimens. Very rare and expensive, but not for sale, this one stays in the family
 
 

 George H Marsh was born in Augusta Maine, and came out west to Leadville in 1879. He took part in several different mining operations with little success, and was first listed in Leadville directories as a bar keep for H. Hibschle in 1883. From 1882 to 1886 Marsh held the agency of P. H. Zang & Co. St Louis beer. Thomas Ford was born in Madison Wiscosin, and came to Leadville in 1880. He was in the teaming business, and was listed in the Leadville directories from 1881 to 1887 as an expressman. Ford and Marsh combined forces in 1887 and opened a saloon on 300 W 3rd street, just across the street from the Midland rail road depot. The saloon was known as the Midland saloon, and cartered to the rail road men. This establishment had a reputation for strictly high class liquors, wines, and cigars, and boasted a large select town patronage. George Marsh was listed as prominent Leadville citizen and was a member of the Masonic order, the Elks, and the Knights of Pythias. He also served a seat on the Aldermanic board for the city of Leadville. Though known as the Midland saloon, the business was referred to as Marsh & Ford saloon in all the Leadville directories. It remained in the directories through 1895 ( an 1896 directoriy was not available) and was listed only as George Marsh in 1897, Ford was no longer involved in the business.. Thanks for your intrest in my Whisky flask, it is a very rare western whiskey
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  CASWELL  HAZARD & CO.

 THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF TAYLOR MCBURNEY FROM RHODE ISLAND. THESE BOTTLES ARE FOUND IN AQUA,COBALT BLUE AND SHADES OF AMBER, THIS IS ONE OF THOSE BOTTLES THAT THE AMBER IS RARER THAN THE COBALT. TAYLOR DOESN'T HAVE ONE...HE HAS THREE VARIANTS OF THE AMBER'S. I POSTED SOME INFORMATION ON THE HISTORY AND TRANSITION OF THE COMPANY BELOW, THANKS TAYLOR. GREAT STUFF.

 "They come in 3 eras (Caswell Mack, Caswell Hazard, and Hazard Hazard). They all come in cobalt and clear, the later two in amber. There are also violet, root beer amber, light tea, and green versions. Let me know if you find a Caswell-Massey bottle in this shape!"

 Here are some of my other variants  flickr photo's

 

 Hazard & Caswell

Roland P. Hazard, physician, and John C. Caswell, a wholesale and retail druggist, were located at 12 Washington Square and 132 Thames Street in Newport, Rhode Island in 1856.
    

Their sons, Roland R. Hazard and Phillip Caswell, both residents of New York City, took over the company from their fathers in 1857 becoming Hazard & Caswell. They dealt in medicines, perfumes, brushes, soaps, artists materials, and other items. They became proprietors of Formodenta tooth paste, a liquid dentrifice called Amber Wash, Dentine, a safe
and elegant tooth powder, Feke's Vegetable Dyspepsia Bitters, and several inks and ink and grease removers.

By 1863, John R. Caswell of Newport and Henry F. Mack and Phillip Caswell, Jr. both from New York City, joined together and took over the company changing the name to Caswell Mack & Co. The company was located in both Newport and New York City.

In the early 1880's, the company's name changed to Caswell-Hazard & Co., Family & Dispensing Chemists and still remained in the Newport location as well as the Fifth Avenue Hotel on Broadway at the corner of 24th Street, and at Sixth Avenue at the corner of 39th Street both in New York City.

Later, from 1887 to 1893 the company became Hazard, Hazard & Co. and was run only by John C. Hazard and Roland N. Hazard.

In the late 1890's, John R. Caswell, William M. Massey, and Lyman B. Blackman joined together and were operating out of Newport on Thames Street and another location on Bellevue Avenue, and also in New York under the name Caswell Massey & Co. By 1906 they were succeeded by Hall, Lyons, & Co., New England Apothecaries, 212 Thames Street in Newport and continued until 1915.

The company was still in business, reverting back to the Caswell-Massey name sometime in the past, as evident in their ad in the Providence Evening Bulletin dated August 8, 1980. The ad stated that their motto was, "The Fragrant World of Caswell & Massey."   littlerhodybottleclub.org



Caswell-Massey is a personal care product company and apothecary shop founded in 1752 in Newport, Rhode Island, by a Scottish-born doctor named William Hunter. It is one of the oldest continuously operating companies in the United States and the world; ranked by the Wikipedia List of oldest companies as one of the oldest ongoing retail companies in the United States, and third oldest ongoing perfumer in the world. The main product categories it sells are soaps, fragrances, lotions, shaving products and tools, other apothecary-style personal care accessories, and bath- and fragrance-related products for the home.

Originally called Dr. Hunter’s Dispensary, it began as an apothecary shop selling medical supplies. Dr. Hunter was active in the community, and gave the first lectures on anatomy and surgery in the Colonies in 1755. During that time, he also invented orange soda to help his customers take the medicines sold in his apothecary shop.

Newport, Rhode Island, at the time, attracted the Colonies’ social elite who sought European-style luxuries. While serving his customers’ medical needs, Dr. Hunter also began to serve their cosmetic, personal care and hygiene needs as well. He imported fragrances from Europe and blended some 20 different colognes himself. The fragrances were numbered One through Twenty of which Number Six (created in 1789) was favored by George Washington and John Adams. Number Six, with its orange and bergamot scent, continues to be sold by the company to this day.

For approximately the first three quarters of a century the apothecary shop changed owners in the tradition of each retiring pharmacist handing over the keys to his apprentice. Dr. William Hunter was followed by Charles Feke who in turn was followed by Rowland Hazard in 1822. Hazard took Philip Caswell into partnership and the name became Hazard & Caswell. In 1833 following Rowland Hazard’s death the company became Caswell & Hazard. In the same year the first Caswell-Massey branch opened in New York City.

A fragrance called Jockey Club was introduced in 1840. This fragrance later is said to have been a favorite of President John F. Kennedy. It is also currently sold today. In 1860 Castile Soap is introduced, and was used by Abraham Lincoln after his inauguration in 1861. The company during that time also continued to make other apothecary products. Among General Custer’s personal
effects at “the last stand” Battle of Little Bighorn of 1876 was a Caswell-Massey toothbrush, still on display at the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument.

The company took its present name Caswell-Massey when then-owner John Rose Caswell formed a partnership with New York businessman William Massey in 1876. In that year the company operated only two stores, one in Newport and one in New York City. Over the next 30 years Caswell-Massey grew to 10 stores in New York City, but closed its Newport store in 1906.

In 1916, a 13-year old Ralph Taylor was hired to sweep the shop and clean bottles in the basement. Twenty years later, in 1936, Ralph and his younger brother Milton bought the company. Ralph and Milton would own Caswell-Massey for 53 years.

During the early-to-mid 1900s leaders in business, politics and the arts frequented the Caswell-Massey stores to fill their prescriptions and purchase personal care supplies. Customers included the Astors and Vanderbilts  Edgar Allan Poe, George Gershwin, Judy Garland, Katharine Hepburn and Greta Garbo[3]. In 1926 a store is opened on Lexington and 48th in New York City, in what was then the Barclay Hotel, later InterContinental New York Barclay Hotel. That location is currently the company’s flagship store, and is one of the oldest ongoing retail stores in New York City.

Almond Cold Cream soap was launched in 1940. Dwight and Mamie Eisenhower ordered it for the White House after he became president in 1953. Mamie Eisenhower was also a fan of “White Rose” perfume, writing a thank you letter to the company. During the second half of the century, customers also included Jacqueline Onassis (who bought avocado oil) and the Rolling Stones[3].

Caswell-Massey currently has one retail store in the United States, sells products through its website and mail-order catalog, as well as through department stores and specialty shops. The store is located in New York City, NY. The website is www.caswellmassey.com

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK STRAW YELLOW DRAKES PLANTATION BITTERS
THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS ONE I HAVE WANTED TO RUN SINCE STARTING BOTTLE OF THE WEEK AND FOR SOME REASON HAVE YET TO HAVE ONE SUBMITTED,SO...... I KNEW EXACTLY WHERE TO GO TO FIND ONE.  FERDINAND  MEYERS FROM PEACH RIDGE GLASS WAS ONCE AGAIN GRACIOUS ENOUGH TO ALLOW ME TO SHARE ONE OF THE INCREDIBLE EXAMPLES FROM THE MEYERS COLLECTION. THANK YOU FOR THAT. PLEASE TAKE THE TIME TO STOP BY PEACH RIDGE GLASS AND CHECK IN ON FERDINAND AND ELIZABETH'S LATEST HAPPENING'S.
I FOUND SOME PRETTY INTERESTING INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY AND HAVE POSTED IT HERE.
 
 
 
 
"Rick over at RicksBottleroom.com asked me to send him a picture of one of my favorite Drakes Plantation Bitters. This is darn near impossible. I did send him a neat, soft, straw yellow example as one to consider for his Bottle of the Week post instead of one of my green examples. Tough to pick a favorite Drakes though I am going to submit this oddball, gorgeous, soft straw-yellow baby. The obvious place to look first would have been my green grouping but my back fields today represent this color. A light yellow 6-log like this one is tough to find. Remember there is a Drakes shoot-out in Reno in July."
 
 

DRAKES PLANTATION BITTERS WAS INTRODUCED IN 1860 BY PATRICK HENRY DRAKE & DEMAS BARNES OF NEW YORK CITY. THE ORIGINAL TITLE WAS "PLANTATION TODDY" AND INITIALLY THE BOTTLE WAS EMBOSSED "ST/DRAKES/1860/PLANTATION BITTERS" REPRESENTING THE DATE OF INTRODUCTION. THIS WAS CHANGED TO "PLANTATION BITTERS/PATENTED 1862 WHEN DRAKE PATENTED HIS SQUARE AMBER COLORED LOG CABIN SHAPED BOTTLE. THE CRYPTIC LETTERS "S-T-1860-X" STOOD FOR STARTED TRADE IN 1860 WITH $10.00.
MANY OF THE CABIN SHAPED BOTTLES WERE PRODUCED BY WHITNEY GLASS WORKS, THE FIRM CONTINUED BUSINESS FOR A TIME AFTER P.H.DRAKE DIED IN 1883. OPERATED BY WILLIAM P. WARD AS SOLE PROPRIETOR.
TODAY THEY ARE VERY COLLECTABLE AND COLORS OTHER THAN AMBER COMMAND HIGH DOLLARS.



THE TRIBUNE 1882

"S. T.—1860—X" are the cabalistic characters which advertise to an admiring, and astonished, and love-to-be-humbugged world—one of the most successful impositions of the day. One can hardly open a newspaper without seeing "Drake's Plantation Bitters" displayed in conspicuous capitals. Wherever we travel we are obliged to notice, on every smooth-faced rock a solitary brand by the way side, the inevitable " S. T.—1860—X, Drake's Plantation Bitters." Now all quack nostrum-vendors perfectly understand, that the sale of their stuff is exactly proportioned to the extent of their advertising, and that the benefit of advertising depends entirely on the extent to which it catches the public eye. Nobody pretends to believe a tenth part of what is asserted with regard

to the wonderful virtues of their specifics; but nine-tenths of the people believe, that on the principle that where there is much smoke there must be some fire, the more a given medicine is advertised, and puffed, and displayed, and sworn to, the more virtue there must be in it. Hence, all that an enterprising empiric has to do in order to realize a fortune, is to advertise in a way to ensure attention. Thus, if Drake, Townsend, Brandreth, Moffatt, Holloway, Hostetter, Wolfe, or any other vendor of sweetened alcohol, dietetic gin, or patent perpendicular purging potency's, can expend five hundred thousand dollars a year in advertising, and can thereby sell six hundred thousand dollars' worth of his cure-all, the cost of which will not exceed fifty thousand dollars, he will realize a clear fifty thousand dollars' profit, and, in a few years, become a millionaire, and move in the "first circles" of society.

So far as we can judge from evidences of advertising, Drake is just now distancing all of his competitors in this time of traffic. The less people understand of the nature or qualities of drug-remedies, the more they run after them the world over. It is enough for the proprietor of the plantation bitters to advertise in tho silliest manner possible, and he will be sure to catch the greater number of customers. With tho masses of the people, "the greater the absurdity the more implicit the faith." If they knew precisely what made the charm of plantation bitters, they would not patronize the cunning Mr. Drake at all. They would purchase the raw materials and make their own bitters at a saving of several hundred per cent. The liquor could be had at the first grog-shop, and the seasonings at any grocery or drug-shop, and the article compounded at one tenth the expense.

We must, however, do Mr. Drake the justice to say, that in lauding his hitters as the panacea for all the ills that flesh is heir to, he is hut responding to a demand on the part of the public. The demand for alcoholic stimulus is increasing rapidly. Alcoholic medication is everywhere extending under the auspices of the medical profession. It is even hieing extensively introduced by regular physicians as a preventive of disease. "Wolfe, Reed, Charles, Messenger, Suit, and others are flooding the land with favorite brands of gin, and superior "old Bourbon" whisky, to say nothing of lager-beer breweries which are rising among us like mushrooms of a night. But there is one objection to the general, the almost universal, use of these forms of grog medicine. There is a prejudice with many people against "spirituous and malt liquors, wine and cider," except as a medicine. The temperance people and the teetotal abstainers have created, to some extent, a public sentiment against resorting to alcoholic liquors, under the names of rum, brandy, gin, whisky, &c., except in cases of extreme indisposition—real sickness. The dealers in alcoholic drinks wish to sell them not only as medicine to cure sickness, and prophylactics to prevent sickness, but also as an elixir vita to renovate weak constitutions, invigorate strong ones, impart vitality, prolong longevity, &c., &c. In short it is the interest of all dealers in intoxicating medicines to have all sorts of people purchase them for all possible purposes, and resort to them on all conceivable occasions.

But we have religious and temperance newspapers (and now and then a temperance physician), which have conscientious scruples about advertising grog-remedies for all diseases under the names of gin, whisky, &c.; and it is very desirable to have these mediums of communication with the public on the part of the grogvenders. Indeed one such journal or physician is worth half a dozen of those who make no pretensions to moral and religious convictions, or to physiological principles. And herein Drake has made a hit. He does not advertise "cordial gin," nor "Scheidam Schnapps," nor "Bourbon," but "litters," and lo! the temperance papers advertise it, the temperance doctors recommend it, and temperance people swallow it.

A clergyman writes from Vermont:

"Dr. Trall: I see the papers, even those that claim to be true to temperance, as the New York Independent, for example, are giving large place in their advertising columns to Dr. Drake's 'Plantation Bitters.' Will you please tell your readers, at a distance, the true character

of the bitters. Are they simply a 'patent medicine' to drug the sick? Or are they a substitute for rum, whisky, &c., to catch those who do not like to be esteemed * drinkers?'
AT LEFT ~  MORE AMAZING DRAKES FROM THE MEYER'S COLLECTION.

"Temperance."

THE RADICAL REVIEW 1883

An interesting explanation of the 23rd psalm by the Rev. Mr. Drake, of Northfield, Mass., was considered worth printing in The Tribune, and the style of it suggests a suspicion that the reverend gentleman is the proprietor of "Drake's Plantation Bitters." The sermon reads very much like an advertisement of that nauseous but stimulating tipple. "The twenty-third psalm," said Mr. Drake, "was intended by the Lord as a faith tonic," or, in other words, a sort of theological Plantation Bitters. Following the analogy, and borrowing from the eloquent label on the bottle, the reverend gentleman informs us that "if a portion of it is read every day for several successive days, accompanied by prayer, it will prove a great spiritual strengthener." The defect in this prescription is, that it fails to specify the exact quantity to be taken, whereas the label on the bottle prescribes a wine-glass full of the "tonic" three times a day, and is warranted to give the desired relief without any prayer at all. In fact the Plantation Bitters has most virtue as a "strengthener" when not accompanied by prayer. Still borrowing from the label, and but slightly varying it, the Rev. Mr. Drake warned his congregation that "Christians are too much in the habit of doctoring themselves, and so go down to the grave with afflictions that might have been cured at once if they had applied to the great physician," and taken

their "tonic" with proper regularity. It is comforting to know that the Rev. Mr. Drake is not going to return immediately to Massachusetts, but will continue to dispense the "spiritual strengthener" at the Chicago Avenue Church. It is to be hoped that The Tribune will not fail to send a reporter there so that the prescriptions may be published promptly on Monday morning.
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  BROWN'S BLOOD TREATMENT, PHILADELPHIA

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF ELLIOT WILFONG, BROWNS BLOOD TREATMENT IN A DEEP EMERALD GREEN. I REALLY LIKE THIS BOTTLE. DATING TO THE 1880'S RANGE AND FROM PHILADELPHIA PA.. THANKS VERY MUCH ELLIOT FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE YOUR GREAT BOTTLE.

 

 

 

(From The Journal A. M. A., Sept. 1, 1917.) Brown's Blood Treatment.—This preparation was manufactured and sold by the Brown Co., 935 Arch St., Philadelphia, and had formerly been called "Brown's Blood Cure." The preparation was analyzed by the federal chemists, who reported that it contained 5.65 grams of potassium iodid and 0.1 gram of a mercury compound to each 100 c.c. It was claimed to be a cure for syphilis in all its forms and to be effective in the treatment of all forms of rheumatism, chronic sores, chronic ulcers, scrofula, boils, carbuncles, eczema, contagious blood poison and various other conditions. These claims were declared to be knowingly and

 

wantonly false and fraudulent. The company was fined $100[Notice of Judgment No. 4443; issued Oct. 16, 1916.]

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK WASHINGTON / JACKSON FLASK  ~ COVENTRY GLASS, CONN.

 BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF RICK CIRALLI FROM BRISTOL CONNECTICUT, A COUPLE OF RARE PIECES FROM COVENTRY GLASS CO., CONNECTICUT. THE FLASK IS LISTED AS A  GI~32 WASHINGTON/JACKSON AND ALSO A NICE TUMBLER ATTRIBUTED TO COVENTRY AS WELL. THESE ARE JUST A SMALL PART OF RICKS GREAT COLLECTION OF HISTORICAL GLASS, THANKS RICK FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE A COUPLE OF YOUR GREAT TREASURES. 

 

 

 

The Coventry Glassworks 1815-1848


On January 14th, 1813, seven men signed an agreement to erect a glass factory at Coventry along the Boston Post Road. They were Captain Nathaniel Root Sr., Ebenezer Root Jr and Joseph A. Norton all of Coventry. Eli Evans, Thomas Bishop and Uriah Andrews were from East Hartford. By 1820, it is believed that Thomas Stebbins was operating the glassworks. His initials T.S. are embossed on the Lafayette GI-80 pint mold. Another Stebbins must have also worked there as S & S is also embossed on the Lafayette GI-86 1/2 pint mold. This was around 1825. Later that year the firm became Stebbins & Chamberlain (Thomas Stebbins & Rufus Chamberlain) also evidenced by yet another embossed flask, S & C which was the Lafayette GI-81 1/2 pint mold. In 1828, the firm was taken over by Gilbert, Turner & Company ( Jasper Gilbert, John Turner, Rufus Chamberlain & Levi Turner) On October 31st, 1828, they became both the owners of the Coventry Glassworks and West Willington glassworks. Gilbert, Turner and Alvin Preston were among the founders of the Ellenville, NY glassworks in 1836. In the spring of 1838, Chamberlain bought the interest of some others and the old firm dissolved and the sole owners were Chamberlain & Turner. Lack of fuel and wood slowed the works down and the eventual closing around 1849. Coventry was a powerhouse though and produced all types of bottles, porters, wines, flasks, snuffs, blackings, octagon vials, jars of all sizes, demijohns, chestnuts, sunburst flasks, Pitkin-type flasks, medicine types including a large lettered Swaims Panacea, blown three molded wares including inkwells & tableware. Coventry glass comes in an impressive array of colors but the yellow-olive-greens and ambers dominated. The figured historical flasks are the most popoular and prized with the Lafayette grouping as well as two rare masonic molds. Some examples of Coventry bottles can be seen at the Coventry Historical Society in Coventry, Connecticut.  © 2011 The Museum of Connecticut Glass -- All rights reserved 

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  BOORNE & COMPANY FLAGON ~ WALLINGTON
THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF PAUL BERNARD FROM LONDON ENGLAND. I WOULD NOT MIND DIGGING ONE OF THESE AT ALL, I HAVE A BIG SOFT SPOT FOR STONEWARE AND THIS IS JUST A GREAT DISPLAY. PAUL STATES HE DUG THIS LAST YEAR NEAR GARETH. WHAT A GREAT FIND AND A PRETTY SCARCE ONE AT THAT. I MANAGED TO FIND A LITTLE HISTORY ON THE OPERATION. THANKS PAUL FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE YOUR DIGS.
 
 
BOORNE & COMPANY LTD. WALLINGTON BREWERY, WALLINGTON, SURREY
WALLINGTON BREWERY WAS FOUNDED IN 1810 , PRODUCING ALES,STOUT'S AND PORTERS. FROM THE YEAR 1828 UNTIL 1839 IT WAS OWNED BY MR.JAMES APTED. THOMAS BOORNE THEN TOOK OWNERSHIP IN 1855 TO BE FOLLOWED BY MRS. S.B. BOORNE IN 1859 WHO CONTINUED TO OPERATE IT UNTIL 1894. IN 1894 JAMES BOORNE TOOK THE HELM UNTIL 1927 AT WHICH TIME "BOORNE & COMPANY LTD." WAS REGISTERED AS A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. THE BREWERY WAS RUN FROM 1927 UNTIL 1931 BY SAMUEL ALLSOPP & SONS LTD. BURTON ON TRENT, STAFFORDSHIRE. THEY TOOK OWNERSHIP IN 1931. THE SITE HAS SINCE BEEN DEMOLISHED.
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK CARR BROS AND CARR, NORFOLK STREET, NORTH SHIELDS

 
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  IS A REAL LOOKER AND COMES FROM MY FRIEND ACROSS THE POND..STUART BAILEY. WHAT A COOL BOTTLE THIS IS, I CAN UNDERSTAND WHY STUART CONSIDERS IT ONE OF THE BEST BOTTLES HE HAS EVER OWNED. HE THINKS MAYBE HIS FRIEND EDDIE DUG IT.....GREAT FRIEND. I FOUND THE INFORMATION BELOW AND BELIEVE IT TO BE FROM THE SAME COMPANY AS NAMES ECT FALL IN PLACE. IF ANYONE HAS ANY MORE OR WOULD LIKE TO ADD TO THIS .....PLEASE SEND IT MY WAY. THANKS VERY MUCH STUART....MORE GREAT STUFF!!!
 
North Shields Pottery was established at the Low Lights, North Shields in c.1814 possibly by Collingwood & Beall, although later, the business, trading as "William Collingwood & Company" was a partnership with John Thompson and although this was dissolved in February 1819, William Collingwood carried on alone.Unfortunately, he was soon declared bankrupt and by 1823 the business was owned by Nicholas Bird and trading as "Bird & Co.".

In October 1826 the business was advertised for sale, under the name of "The Northumberland Earthenware Manufactory" and a little later, Mr Bird was also declared bankrupt in October 1827.In or around 1829, the business was owned by Messrs Cornfoot, Colville & Co. and by March 1832 "The North Shields Earthenware Manufactory" was doing business under the ownership of Cornfoot, Carr & Co.,advertising to the public for home consumption or exportation, their stock of best quality goods and ornamental vases of superior quality and exquisite workmanship.

Following the demise of Mr.Cornfoot, in February 1838 the firm became known as "Carr and Patton" and were able,by their alliance with an eminent Staffordshire manufactory,to procure the newest models and patterns of any article of china of the best quality and fashion at manufacturers prices. In July 1838, they provided the plates, etc. for a dinner given by the Borough of Tynemouth, for around 900 aged North Shields seamen, each piece having a portrait of the Queen in the centre surrounded by an inscription. By 1846, Carr and Patton were listed as the owners of both North Shields Pottery and the Phoenix Pottery in Newcastle, but this partnership was dissolved on 31st December 1846 and by 1850 the North Shields pottery was trading as "Carr & Co.". A few years later, in 1855, they announced the opening of a show room in Norfolk Street in the town, under the name of "John Carr & Son".
John Carr & Sons Gardeners Arms Bowl

Having produced brown and black wares in addition to the ordinary earthenware since the start, this was discontinued in 1856 and substituted with white, cream coloured, printed, painted and lustred (Sunderland Lustreware) varieties. These were also exported, principally to the Mediterranean ports and via Alexandria to Cairo and across the Red Sea to Bombay (Mumbai).
John Carr & Sons Geometric Pattern Dish


In 1861, the name changed to "John Carr & Sons" and the firm remained as such until it closed. In April 1884, a fire broke out in the drying house and the building was completely gutted, damage estimated to be under £1000.00. However, in December 1893, a further fire broke out in the printing and dipping department and again the building was gutted and damage was considerable, very many pieces of ware in the final stages of preparation were lost.The remaining stock of pottery was taken over by one of the employees, Mr.M.King, and sold from a large warehouse on the premises.

The manufacture of pottery had actually been discontinued since a change of ownership in June and the end of pottery making in North Shields was confirmed with the sale of plant and machinery in March 1894, although the company did continue in the manufacture of glazed bricks and other similar items, until around 1910.The firm eventually closed completely and the buildings were dismantled in 1913.

During renovation work on nearby Cliffords Fort, whilst re-opening some embrasures which were bricked up during the 1880s, it was discovered that they had been filled with quantities of pottery waste from the Low Lights Pottery. As much of the production was for export, particularly to India and Egypt, many of the forms and patterns found were of a type not seen on Tyneside and it is hoped that enough material will be recovered to put together a small exhibition.

The importance of the pottery to the local economy can be shown by the numbers employed. In 1851, this was 65 men, 32 women, 26 boys and 22 girls. In 1861 this had become 50 men, 15 women and 20 boys. Ten years later, this had changed to 54 men, 28 women, 38 boys and 22 girls, and in 1881, adult employment had increased to 72 men, 45 women plus 21 boys
BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  3 RARE L.P. DODGE MEDICINES

BOTTLE'S OF THE WEEK  ARE THREE L.P. DODGES FROM THE COLLECTION OF EDWARD D. NIKLES AND HAVING ONE OF THESE RARE NEWBURG NEW YORK BOTTLES IS IMPRESSIVE...HAVING THREE, WELL THAT'S AMAZING. THANKS FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE YOUR GREAT COLLECTION EDWARD.

 

"The example in middle is ex. Greer and is GREEN correct sticker on rear ! One on left was dug in NYC & has lots of " orange peel " on glass . One on right is the only hinge mold example known ."
 
 
HERE IS SOME OTHER STUFF MR. DODGE WAS INVOLVED IN.
 
No. 35,222.—L. P. Dodge, of Newburg, N. Y. Improvement in Pumps.—Patent dated May 13, 1862.—This invention consists in arranging the ball valves in valve chambers divided by a partition in the lower portion of tho air chamber, extending from which to each end of the barrel of the pump, are two discharge passages provided with a valve, seat in the same plane with the top of the barrel. This construction is designed to avoid making more than one joint, and that a small and easily adjusted one.

Claim.—First, the arrangement of the valves M Л in the valve chambers К L in the base of the near vessel II, and arranging the scats / g near the joint between the parts, so that there is but a single joint of small area connecting the passages F G with the air chamber, all as set forth and for the purpose specified.

 

TIME OUT TO BUILD A NEW BOTTLE ROOM....A GOOD AS EXCUSE AS YOU CAN GET.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK H.E. BUCKLEN ELECTRIC BITTERS

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM CHRIS EIB (BOTTLEBOYS) COLLECTION AND AS YOU CAN SEE HE HAS PUT TOGETHER A NICE COLLECTION ON THIS COMPANY. I FOUND SOME INFORMATION AND ADDED IT TOO, THANKS CHRIS...GREAT STUFF.

H.E. Bucklen & Company of Chicago were highly successful sellers of a number of well-known brands. Herbert E. Bucklen had purchased the rights to his medicines from one Dr. Z.L. King of Elkhart, Indiana, about 1878 and moved the business from Elkhart to Chicago about 1878-1879. Bucklen spent lavish sums on advertising in all types of media, and created the brand name of "New Discovery", which had national recognition by 1885. He also had several other top selling medicines including the Electric Bitters, mentioned above, and The New Life Pills, introduced in 1880 as a cure for stomach ailments. Products which never sold well were Dr. King's California Golden Compound. Dr. King's Hop Cordial, and Dr. Scheeler's Great German Cure for Consumption

Bucklen's "New Discovery" was a medicine for consumption (tuberculosis) a disease which at the time was killing millions of people. Many companies offered cures and remedies for consumption --- all were frauds, including the "New Discovery."

Bucklen's "New Discovery" was targeted by Samuel Hopkins Adams in his attack on the patent medicine industry in a series of articles in Colliers Magazine in 1905. Of the 'New Discovery," Adams said:

"It is proclaimed to be the 'only sure cure for consumption.' Further announcement is made that 'it strikes terror to the doctors.' As it is a morphine and chloroform mixture, 'Dr. King's New discovery for Consumption' is well calculated to strike terror to the doctors or to any other class or profession, except, perhaps, the undertakers. It is a pretty diabolical concoction to give to anyone, and particularly to a consumptive. The chloroform temporarily allays the cough, thereby checking Nature's effort to throw off the dead matter from the lungs. the opium drugs the patient into a deceived cheerfulness. The combination is admirably designed to shorten the life of any consumptive who takes it steadily."

By 1893, the business was well enough established be a major retailer through sites at the World's Fair in Chicago. This retailing accomplishment was achieved in part by offering for 50 cents a 31 page book, half filled with color lithographs of the world fair buildings, and the other half descriptive text. The advertising contained therein, of the "New Discovery," made sure that most people who went to the World's Fair to see the marvels available to them at the end of the 19th century thought of the "New Discovery" as one of those marvels.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  EAGLE/MASONIC FLASKS ~ KEENE , N.H.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF MICHAEL GEORGE AND WHAT AN IMPRESSIVE COLLECTION HE HAS PUT TOGETHER. HIS COLOR RUN OF EAGLE/ MASONIC FLASKS CIRCA 1815~1820 FROM KEENE N.H. ARE INCREDIBLE AND I CAN IMAGINE THE EFFORT AND ENJOYMENT THAT IT MUST HAVE BEEN SEARCHING THEM OUT. I HAVE ADDED AN ARTICLE WRITTEN BY HIM AND ALSO FURTHER DOWN THE PAGE SOME MORE INFORMATION ON THESE GREAT PIECES OF OF OUR COUNTRIES HISTORY. I ALSO COULDN'T HELP BUT ADD A COUPLE PICTURES OF SOME OF THE OTHER GREAT GLASS FROM HIS COLLECTION. THANK YOU MICHEAL FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE THE FRUITS OF YOUR LABOR WITH OTHER COLLECTORS.

 

Glassmaking in "early" New Hampshire


by Michael George

  Did you know that glassmaking was the first industry in America? There is a wealth of historical importance in the area of glassmaking in New Hampshire, dating back to the American Revolution. New Hampshire, the Monadanock region in particular, was the choice for numerous glasshouses because of its abundance of wood for fueling the operations and high-quality sand, an important ingredient for glassmaking. However, as many locals know, the elements and terrain in this region can be very harsh.

Temple Glass Works

  The first ?experiment? in producing glass in New Hampshire began 1780, and unfortunately, only survived for a couple of years. Robert Hewes, a prominent Boston businessman, selected the mountainside of Temple, NH to construct his factory.

  He employed Hessian soldiers that deserted from the British Army, as glassblowers. This factory was known as the ?New England Glassworks?. The glasshouse was burned down, rebuilt and burned again, all within 2 years. Hewes attempted to raise money to rebuild the glassworks, however, this failed and Hewes moved back to Boston. The glass produced at the Temple site was primarily crown window glass, as well as many utilitarian wares such as chestnut bottles and freeblown vials. The colors of this glass range from colorless to shades of light green, light olive and olive-ambers. There are a few ?documented? whole examples from this works, and many pieces attributed, however without documentation.

Keene Glass Factories

   There were a few glasshouses in Keene during the first half of the 19th century. One was formed in 1814 and blew primarily window glass. This was known as the ?Keene Window Glass Factory?, and the company flourished until the 1850s, however, there were very few bottles, flasks or utilities blown there. The concentration of the collectible flint glass tableware, bottles, and flasks was produced at the Keene-Marlboro Street factory. Henry Schoolcraft (later known for his exploration of the Ozarks and documentation of Native Americans) established this factory in 1815 with the help of associates, Daniel Watson and Timothy Twitchell. They produced primarily patterned flint glass tableware (decanters, tumblers, pans, etc) to compete with the imported cut glass. These geometric patterns were quite beautiful and intricate in design. Colors of the flint glass range from colorless to deep blues and greens. The factory also produced many early flasks which include designs of eagles, sunburst and Masonic emblems.
   After running into financial difficulties, the factory was taken over by Justus Perry in 1819. Efforts were concentrated on flasks, bottles, inkwells and utilitarian wares made from bottle glass in deeper, darker colors. Although this ?bottle? glass was less refined than that of the earlier flint glass, it proved to be more cost-effective. Perry took on a partner, John Wood, in 1822, who later sold his shares in the company to Sumner Wheeler in 1828. The Keene sunburst flasks were produced at this time. These flasks were embossed within the center of the rays, ?Keen? and ?P&W?, and are available in a pint and 1/2 pint size. Perry and Wheeler continued to produce bottles, flasks, inks and commercial wares until around 1841. As the business began to dissolve, one of the master glassblowers, Joseph Foster, also known as ?Old Bottle Foster?, purchased many of the Marlboro Street Glass Factory assets and moved to Stoddard, NH where he began a glass business in this small town which lasted over 31 years.

Stoddard Glass Factories

The Foster Factories
   The small town of Stoddard, located in the hills of Southwestern NH, was the home to numerous glasshouses through the mid 19th century. Joseph Foster, a top glassblower at the Keene-Marlboro Street glassworks, had purchased many of the assets and begun his own operations in Stoddard. His first furnace was located in South Stoddard, and blew many bottles and flasks, some that had originated from the Keene factory molds, such as the Cornucopia/ Urn flasks
and the Eagle/ Cornucopia flasks, Railroad flasks, as well as blacking bottles, whiskeys, inkwells, medicine/ utility bottles and many demijohns and jars. Although wood and sand were quite plentiful in Stoddard, adequate transportation of the bottles was difficult given the isolated proximity of the town to any railways. Closest shipping points were over 20 miles away. His first furnace burned, and was rebuilt at a different location, and the financial woes continued. Over the next eight years, Foster struggled to make ends meet, and eventually sold off his property and any operations. This would be the end of Joseph Foster?s glass factory in NH, however, his children would play a role in the industry in later years.

Granite Glass Company
  
In the meantime, another glass company formed under the partnership of Gilman Scripture, John Whiton and Calvin Curtis, who had begun operations in Mill Village, Stoddard, around 1846. Mill Village is located between Island pond and Highland Lake. This factory was known as the Granite Glass Company. This factory is known for its eagle flasks which bear its name, embossed ?Granite Glass Co? and ?Stoddard, NH?. Other production included numerous medicine bottles, such as the Dr. Townsend?s Sarsaparilla. Because of the limited production, and embossing which usually included an elaborate concoction, these wonderful medicine bottles have become prized possessions for many collectors. Who could resist the lure of a ?celebrated health restoring bitters? or a ?vegetable cancer and canker syrup?. Inkwells for the Farley?s store in Marlow, NH were produced here as well as many other cone and umbrella inks, including a unique 16-sided umbrella. This factory also blew many off-hand pieces such as jars, hats, whimsies, creamers, bowls, and the beautifully decorated lily-pad pitchers, probably blown by master glassblower, Matt Johnson. The glass from these factories can range in color and consistency, however, the majority color ranges from deep root beer amber to a brilliant light ?honey? amber. There were also many olive hues and even some green glass. The glass character is bubbly, whittled and crude, although very durable. This factory went through hardships and ownership changes until its final closing in 1862.

Weeks and Gilson Works
   There was yet another glasshouse operating in Stoddard at this time. In 1850, Luman Weeks and Frederick Gilson, and a few investors, organized an operation in South Stoddard, known as the South Stoddard Glass Company. Also known as the Weeks and Gilson factory, collectors may be familiar with the base embossed whiskeys that bear its name. This was the longest running factory in Stoddard, spanning a little over two decades. Most notable items from
this factory include many umbrella inkwells, many of the smooth-based and iron pontil medicines, such as the Kimball?s Jaundice Bitters, Hartshorn?s Medicine, and CA Richards. Of mass production were the Stoddard ?stubby? beers, three-piece-mold whiskeys and the bottles for the emerging spring water market. These spring water bottles were a large contribution to the success of this factory. As the popularity and competition grew for the ?Saratoga? spring waters, as did the business for the Weeks and Gilson factory, which seemed to have the market cornered at the time. The glass blown at this factory consisted of a wide range of ambers, from light honey to brilliant red ?blood? amber, and everything in between. The depression during the years following the civil war, and the lack of production of the popular ?aqua? colored glass, led to the closing of this factory in 1873. The warehouse containing thousands of bottles was burned in 1877, leaving melted and distorted bottles strewn about the area.

New Granite Glass Works
   During the activities of the Weeks and Gilson factory in South Stoddard, another factory was emerging in Mill Village. The sons of Joseph Foster established the New Granite Glass Works in 1860. Led by George Foster, the facility employed brothers Charles, Wallace and Joseph Foster Jr., as well as many townspeople. It is reported that during the height of the glass industry in Stoddard during the 1860s, the factories employed over 800 townspeople. Of the many bottles, demijohns, and commercial wares blown at this factory, one important flask stands out, the icon Stoddard flag flask. Embossed with an American flag on one side, the other side is embossed ?New Granite Glass Company, Stoddard NH?. These were produced in a pint and ? pint size. This factory also produced many of the whimsical pieces that desired by glass enthusiasts, such as wonderful lily-pad designs, elaborate canes, creamers and bowls. Also known for the vibrant amber colors, the glass from these works can also be found in olive tones. The factory burned in 1871, and was not rebuilt.

It is noted that many of these glasshouses, with overlapping time spans of each other, were known to have shared molds, handled work overflows, etc. A collector will often encounter two bottles of the same mold, however, exhibiting completely different colors and characteristics. These bottles could have easily been blown at two different glasshouses, as the business of many merchants lasted longer than some of the glass businesses.

  There were other glasshouses in NH that followed the Stoddard glassmaking era, most notably, the Lyndeboro factory, but I?ll save that one for another story. The Temple, Keene and Stoddard glassworks represent some of the most versatile and creative glass of its time, and some of the most collectible glass of our time. Today, some rare items from these glasshouses can sell for thousands of dollars, however, some glass, such as the Stoddard lily pad pitcher, has been reproduced. The author of this article is an avid collector, and welcomes any of your inquiries. If you are interested in learning more about historic New Hampshire glass, or would like a free assessment of your bottles, flasks or early glassware, feel free to contact Michael George at 603.765.8079 or email him at   earlyglass@gmail.com

Publications and Clubs

?A Rare Collection of Keene & Stoddard Glass? by Lyman and Sally Lane / Joan Pappas
?On The Trail Of Stoddard Glass? by Anne E. Field
?Old Bottle Foster? by John Morrill Foster

 There are bottle clubs in all states, check the internet or  Email The author  to find one in your area.

MASON FLASKS - PIECES OF HISTORY antique flasks

ebay By Charles I. Bukin nasa

As Mason and antique bottle collector, I became interested in the history and origin on Masonic flasks. I discovered that these flasks were made in America during the period 1810 to 1830, when the United States and Masonry were both expanding. Masonry had been especially strong in the northeastern part of the United States, and most of the Masonic flasks were manufactured in that region.1

The early Masonic lodges in the United States usually met in one room of a local tavern. These taverns were gathering places for exchanging news and gossip as well as for eating and drinking. At the taverns it was customary for a Mason to partake of the food and liquid refreshments, but each Mason was responsible for his own drinking habits. During this period of time Masonic flasks or pocket flasks, became common at Lodge meetings. Drinking and fellowship were enjoyed after the Masonic meetings were concluded.2

These flasks were of particular shape and size. It is generally agreed that flasks, as defined by Helen McKearin and Kenneth M. Wilson (authors of American Bottles and Flasks and Their Ancestry), are bottles whose cross section is elliptical or ovate, whose convex or flat sides rise to a shoulder or taper directly into a narrow short neck and whose capacity is rarely over a quart and usually not under a pint.3

Flasks were usually made as a by-product in the early years. The early glass houses in the United States made window glass as their primary product. With leftover glass, the blowers would blow bottles and flasks by using the blowpipe and a mold to put a pattern into the glass.

The principal raw materials used to make the glass at the time were calcium carbonate or pure limestone, sodium carbonate or soda ash, and quartz or pure sand. When this mixture of 100 parts of sand, 35-40 parts of limestone and 40-45 parts of soda ash is heated from 1200 degrees to 1500 degrees Fahrenheit, it will melt to form a clear liquid which readily
can be worked into molds or sheets. By changing or adding different chemicals such as borax or lead, the glass becomes harder or softer. By adding iron or iron oxide, the glass becomes green in color. It becomes blue by adding the oxide of cobalt, and purple brown or black by adding oxide or manganese. Some glass blowers used hard coal to get olive green and iron rust to get amber.

The colors of Masonic flasks ranged from that of common aqua to a rare clear hue. The colors varied in shades because the production was not controlled. Individual glass blowers made their own decisions and choices as to chemical additives. A complete list of the thirty-four variations in color recognized by present day flask collectors is included in Appendix A.4

After being formed, the glass bottles were then annealed, or hardened, by slowly lowering the temperatures of the fire or by slowly pulling the bottles from the fire. The fires required a lot of wood, and the later movement of the glass houses from the East Coast was a result of the availability of raw materials. Destruction of the glass houses by fire was quite common, and many were short lived.

During the glass blowing operation, a round glob of glass containing ten to twelve pounds of glass was blown in a mold. The blown glass in the mold was transferred from the end of the blowpipe to a punty or shorter rod. This transfer was made because the blowpipes were four to seven feet long and one to two inches in diameter, and the length of the blowpipe was too unwieldy to continue the glass blowing process.

The shorter rod helped keep the glass in the mold in better condition for handling during the remainder of the forming operation. When the flask was completed, it was then cut off the rod with shears to give a sheared lip. A pontil mark, or scar, was created, on the bottom of the flask, by breaking the flask, or bottle, from the pontil rod.5

Beginning about 1850 the "snap" case was used to hold the bottle during the forming, which caused the bottle to come from the mold with a smooth, hollow base and no pontil mark on the bottom of the bottle. This snap case was a mold that held the molten glass and shaped the flask. Pontil marks then became obsolete. The absence of a pontil mark can be used to assist in dating old flasks and bottles. Bottles usually made before 1850 carry a pontil mark on the bottom.6

Masonic symbols were added to these flasks by the bottle or glass manufacturers.7 The symbols were embossed into the flask from the metal molds used to blow the glass flasks. These metal molds were used over and over by the glass blower, and the symbols were even modified on occasion.8

A list of Masonic symbols known to have been used to decorate flasks is included in the Appendix B.9

Records available of those glass works which provided the Masonic flasks during this period included: Keene-Marlboro Street Glassworks, Keene, New Hampshire; Stoddard Glass Works, Stoddard, New Hampshire; Coventry Glass Works, Coventry, Connecticut; Kensington Glass Works, T.W. Dyott and A.R. Samuels, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; White Glass Works, Zanesville, Ohio; Mantua Glass Works, Mantua, Ohio; Knox & McKee, Wheeling, Virginia (later West Virginia); Mount Vernon Glass Works, Mt. Vernon, New York; and Murdock & Cassell, Zanesville, Ohio.10

Some flasks have not been identified as to manufacturer; nevertheless, additional manufacturing information is surfacing from time to time. This information is being used to identify further the glass works responsible for manufacturing the flasks.

Some of the employees and glass blowers of the glass manufacturers were Masons. Masonry was strong during this period, so it was not unusual for glass manufacturers to have Masons as employees. It would be easy to speculate that those glass blowing Masons took speculate that those glass blowing Masons took special care and interest in creating Masonic flasks.

The Keene Marlboro Street Glassworks in Keene, New Hampshire, and the local Masonic Lodge were closely tied to each other. The majority of the Masonic flasks found were manufactured at the Keene Marlboro Street Glassworks. Harry Schoolcraft, a member of the Keene Lodge, was superintendent and owner of the Keene Glassworks in 1815 and his initials, H.S., are embossed in the Keene Masonic flasks.

Later, in 1817, Justis Perry became the owner of the glassworks, and he changed the flask initials to J.P. This accounts for two different versions of the Keene flask. One version has the initials H.S., and the other has the initials J.P.11

 APPENDIX A

Masonic Flasks - Colors  Amethyst Golden Amber  Deep Amethyst (black) Amber   Clear Green Clear Amber   Emerald Green Deep Brownish Amber  Clear Deep Green Citron

Peacock Green Blue, Grayish  Light Green Blue, Pale  Yellow-Green Violet-Blue  Very Pale Green Pale Amethystine  Dark Olive Green Clear, Almost Crystal  Deep Bluish Green Deep Sapphire Blue

Deep Yellowish Green Greenish Blue Puce  Clear Green-Yellowish Tone Clear with Bluish Tint  Light Yellow Green Clear Bluish-Green  Aquamarine Cornflower Blue  Olive Green Colorless, Smokey  Olive Amber Black-Dark Olive Green
    
APPENDIX B

Masonic Symbol on Flasks  The Masonic Pavement  A Two Column Archway with Keystone in the Center  Radiant All-Seeing Eye  Radiant Triangle  Letter "G"  Open Bible

Square and Compass  Trowel  Skull and Crossed Bones  Jacob's Ladder  "Cloudy Canopy" or "Star Decked Heaven"  Radiant Quarter Moon Surrounded by Seven Stars

Blazing Sun  Beehive  Crossed Level and Plumb Line  Paschal Lamb  Ark of Covenant  Scythe  Comet with Tails  Hourglass  Five Pointed Star  Sprig of Acacia  Coffin and Spade

Seven Lighted Tapers in Triangular Form  Setting Maul  Naked Heart  Past Masters Sign   Crossed Keys  Star of David  Sheaf of Rye   Star-Crescent Moon

One of the rarest Masonic flasks ever found was manufactured by Coventry Glass Works at Coventry, Connecticut. On one side of the container is the letter "G" along with a square and compasses. The "G" is reversed and appears to be a mold error. On the reverse side of the flask appear the crossed keys, which could represent the treasurer's office. It is believed by this writer that the designs on the flasks represent various degrees in Freemasonry. Some of he Keene Marlboro Street flasks have the letter "G" embossed while others do not have it, which could represent the several degrees. The designs of this period on the flask are clear, and the workmanship was good, especially in the making of the molds. The outlines and details of the Masonic symbols on these antique flasks are clear and sharp, and the work on the eagles especially shows finer details as compared to newer flasks with eagles.

The glass industry expanded rapidly in the 1860's, and the type of bottles and flasks manufactured changed from ornate to plain with the addition of paper labels. Also, the larger bottles, quart and fifth gallon size for whiskey or spirits, became more popular.

Flasks may be classified into four categories: decorative, Masonic, historical and pictorial. Some flasks may be classified as members of more than on category depending on which design is chosen as most important. Historical flasks are those which have portraits of heroes such as George Washington, Andrew Jackson, Benjamin Franklin and General Lafayette. These flasks usually have an American Eagle on the reverse side.

Debate exists concerning classification of flasks; the Masonic flask is usually defined as one embossed with Masonic symbols. Some have Masonic symbols on both sides, but the majority have an American Eagle on one side. Many of the men depicted on historical flasks were Masons, meaning that a discussion of Masonic flasks would not be complete without reference to historical flasks as well.13

The first advertisement for Masonic flasks was on 4 March 1822 in Aurora General Advertiser of Philadelphia. The Masonic flask offered for sale (2,000 dozen) had the USS Franklin on one side and agricultural Masonic symbols (sheaf of rye, shovel and scythe and also non-Masonic symbols, rake and pitchfork) on the other side. They sold for 62 1/2 cents per dozen. These were manufactured by T.W. Dyott-Kensington factories, located at the corner of Second and Race Streets, Philadelphia.14

The popularity of Masonic flasks rapidly declined around 1840 and they eventually ceased to be manufactured because of several factors. One incident concerned William Morgan, an obscure and derelict stonemason. Morgan disappeared outside the jail at Canadaigua, New York, on 12 September 1826 after serving time in jail for failing to repay a debt of $2,69. He had also just finished writing an expose' of the secret rituals of Freemasonry. He claimed to be a Mason and a member of several Lodges. This claim has never been verified. His disappearance started a period of unrest and fostered bad publicity for Masonry in the Northeastern United States. The Morgan Affair also had a serious impact on Masonry throughout the nation. One result of this bad publicity was the development of the Antimasonic party, which was active from 1826 until 1843 and campaigned against Masonry. According to William Preston Vaughn in The Antimasonic Party in the United States 1826-1843, it was really an anti-Jackson party as well as a movement of social protest.15

Another factor was the temperance issue, which became a national movement in the 1840s. Masons did not want to be associated with flasks, which promoted the consumption of alcoholic beverages. It may be that the Morgan unrest alone caused the sudden cessation of the use of the Masonic flasks and played a major role in ending their manufacture, or it could have been a combination of factors.

IN MEMORIAM

The wines they drank from you, old flask, before the revolution    Would fill full many a keg and cask with vigorous solution;     But now you're empty and alone,

Exiled from liquidation,    And not a drop to call your own,   That's dreamed of fermentation;    The household flagon used to be

The cheer of every minute,    But now it's party of history   That there is nothing in it.

Stephen Van Renssaelaer (1926)16
        
Ironically, one of the first persons to write a book on bottle flasks was Stephen Van Renssaelaer, a descendant of a Past Grand Master of New York during the antimasonic period of the 1820s and 1830s.

Masonic flasks are found today in old barns and buildings, cellars, cisterns, privies, and the older dump sites. The old glass manufacturing sites furnish pieces of old flasks which give us added information about the flasks which give us added information about the flasks manufactured at these various locations.

The majority of the verified Masonic flasks are now in private collections, and care should be taken to preserve and expand the limited number now in public museum, where they may have a permanent, safe home for wider viewing and historical research. There are two Masonic flasks in the Masonic Grand Lodge Library and Museum of Texas at Waco.17

NOTES

    Larry Freeman, Grand Old American Bottle, Watkins Glen, NY: Century House, 1964), 55.   Interview with Dr. George H.T. French, 3 April 1990, Denton, Texas.
    Helen McKearin and Kenneth M. Wilson, American Bottles and Flasks and Their Ancestry (New York: Crown Publishers, 1978), 4.
    Ibid., 591-601.    Stephen Van Rennsaelaer, Early American Bottles and Flasks, Revised Edition, (New Haven, CT: J. Edmund Edwards, 1969), 3-16
    Mary Harrod Northed, American Glass (New York: Tudor Publishing, 1935), 69-70     McKearin and Wilson, American Bottles and Flasks, 591-601      Scottish Rite Museum, Masonic Symbols in American Decorative Arts (Lexington, MA, 2976): 27-29      Allen E. Roberts, The Craft and Its Symbols: Opening the Door to Masonic Symbolism (Richmond, VA, MaCoy Publishing, 1974). 3-90.
    John Ramsay, "Masonic Glassware" New York Masonic Outlook 12. (Aug. 1931?: 362-63      Van Rennsaelaer, Early American Bottles, 71.
    Johnson O'Connor, "The Keene Masonic Bottle", Antiques 5 (Feb. 1924): 67-68     McKearin and Wilson, American Bottles and Flasks, 409-90.
    Ibid., 413      William Preston Vaughn, The Antimasonic Party in the United States, 1826-1843, (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1983), 1-9
    Van Rennsaelaer, Early American Bottles, 236.    Telephone conversation with Elizabeth Hylen, Corning Museum, of Glass, Corning, New York, 5 July 1990.

 BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  LANCASTER GLASS WORKS FLASKS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This historic marker details the location of one of New York State's pioneer glass factories!
"On this site stood one of New York State's pioneer glass factories. Established in 1849, by a group of glass blowers from Pittsburgh, Penna., it operated until 1904. The principal output was glass bottles, bitters bottles and whimseys."   

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM FELLOW COLLECTOR/NEW YORKER  MIKE STEPHANO, LANCASTER GLASS WORKS CORNUCOPIA & URN FLASKS, DESIGNATED GIII ~ 17 PINTS.

WHAT A INCREDIBLE RUN OF COLOR HE HAS ASSEMBLED HERE, THESE ARE HARD TO FIND AND ONE CAN ONLY IMAGINE THE EFFORT PUT FORTH TO GATHER THESE IN THIS MANY COLORS.BUT...THEN AGAIN THAT'S HALF THE FUN OF IT ! THANKS MIKE FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE SOME OF YOUR IMPRESSIVE COLLECTION  

LANCASTER GLASS WORKS ~ 1849-1904

Lancaster Glass Works
Lancaster, NY (1849-1908?)
Year this operation closed is uncertain. McKearin quotes two sources, stating it could be either 1890 OR 1908. Some of the firm names used include Reed, Shim & Co.; James & Gatchell; James Glass Works; and the Lancaster Cooperative Glass Works.

producing bottles for firms such as Hostetters Bitters, Merchants Gargling oil,Plantation Bitters, Warners and flasks,storage vessels ect.
Dr. James retires in 1881, when his company was purchased by some of the workman and called the Lancaster Cooperative Glass Works.
     In the early days of Lancaster the glassworks was among the most prominent of the town's industries, and it flourished until 1904. The buildings stood idle for a number of years serving only as shelter for tramps moving through the area. In 1920 the plant was demolished except for one building thought to have been the company store: it is an apartment house today. Part of the old brick furnace lies under the driveway of two homes.

Established, 1849.
Lancaster Co-operative Glass Works   (Successors to Frederick H. James.)  MANUFACTURERS OF GREEN, AMBER & FLINT GLASS.
Particular Attention Given to Private Molds.  HIGH PRESSURE BOTTLES A SPECIALTY.
Public Telephone. Times Office Lancaster, Erie Co., N. Y.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK VERY SCARCE GERMAN LYSOL IRREGULAR

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS THIS VERY SCARCE GERMAN IRREGULAR HEX WITH STOPPER. I AM WORKING ON THE ADDITION TO MY HOUSE,SO I WILL POST THIS COOL POISON AS A FILL. CATCHING UP AS QUICK AS POSSIBLE.HANG IN THERE....SEND ME YOUR FAVORITE.

Referring to a report from Germany, where a Mr. Fulde has cured foul brood by means of a new disinfectant, lysol. Dr. C. D. Miller asked in Gleanings, page88. "What's lysol? and will It work as well in the English language as in the German?" The editor remarks thereon: "I should be interested, also. In knowing whether the disease stayed away. Perhaps Mr. Uravenhorst will answer the question."Yes, I will answer the question according to the best Information I can get. I have not tried lysol, because I did not know of It before September of last year. The new disinfectant has been manufactured for a few years by Schiilke & Mayr, at Hamburg, Germany. They produced it from coaltar. It has a brown color, and smells like tar. In Germany It is to be had In every drugstore, and perhaps in America also. Mr. Fulde purchased a bottle of lysol for 2j£ cents, and therewith cured his bees, which were badly infected with foul brood. He took ten pounds of sugarsyrup, boiled and skimmed it, and mixed it up with 24 drops of lysol and 4 drops of carbolic acid. He gave a colony a soup-plate full of this food. After three days he found the sick larvae dry in their cells, and In a lapse of three weeks not a trace of foul brood was to be found In his colonies. They were sound, and did swarm. Later he has fed lysol in the same way, particularly In the spring, to protect his bees against foul brood. He never saw a trace of it again. That's all I know about lysol. I hope some of the German and American bee-keepers will try the new disinfectant. It would be a great benefit to bee-keeping if lysol should prove to be a remedy for such a rapidly spreading disease as foul brood. Then it would be a trifle for every one to cure the malady himself. However, I confess that I do not have such confidence in lysol as Mr. Fulde has. Experienced bee-keepers in Germany, and I myself, too, are of the oplpion that the disease will disappear, oftentimes, without any cure other than a good honey-flow, when good sound honey is coming in, and that most of the remedies tried in such cases did not cure foul brood at all. The good honey-flow only, did it, nothing more. Hundreds of remedies have been recommended, but, when tried, they would not work as was claimed. May be that, in one or the other case, the remedy was not used as 11 should have been; but I think most of the recommended remedies are worthless, and rest upon illusion. On account of the importance of the matter, it may not be out of the way to report concernIng a disinfectant that I have used nearly twenty years, with such results, that, for my part, I hold the foul brood question as fully solved. I have had to fight hard against foul brood, as I resided In Brunswick, and, later,, here in Wilsnack; but I have never lost one colony by It. I had to guard my apiaries against neighboring bees infected with foul brood, in apiaries only a thousand paces, or less than half a mile, distant. Well, it was a very bad position for myself; but I have fought it out. In a few cases, where the neighboring apiaries were lost by foul brood, I have found iu some of my hives slight traces of the disease. However, they disappeared swiftly by my treatment. I used, and have used till to-day, although I have not at present any apiaries near by that are Infected with foul brood, carbolic acid—not the refined article you get at the drugstore Iu the shape of white crystals, but black and unrefined carbolic acid, which Is intermingled with coal-tar, and mostly used as paint. Refined carbolic acid is too strong, and the sanative power of the tar Is absent In it. I am of the opinion that just the tar, in connection with the carbolic acid, has much to do In the cure of foul brood, as Dr. Preuss said. He was the first bee-keeper who studied foul brood.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK RARE PHILLIP GARDNER TORPEDO ~ BALTIMORE,MD.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF CHRIS ROWELL FROM BALTIMORE, MARYLAND.

 A RARE GARDNER TORPEDO SODA.

 " I collect Pontiled And Early Smooth Base Baltimore Mineral Waters, Sodas, Beers, Early Pottery Bottles, Pontiled And Early Smooth Based Baltimore Medicines, And Other High Quality Baltimore Bottles That I like. With my favorite type of bottles being the early colored torpedoes and ten pins from Baltimore. I also have an interest in early ceramics primarily redware and stoneware produced in Baltimore"

 

I PICKED THESE GARDNER TORPEDO BOTTLES FROM THE GREAT GLASS HE HAS LISTED ON HIS SITE FOR THE STYLE AND COLOR. THESE ARE JUST GREAT LOOKING BOTTLES. I HAVE A LINK TO HIS SITE POSTED HERE WITH MORE GREAT GLASS, ARTIFACTS DIGGING PICTURES. IT IS WELL WORTH THE VISIT. THANKS CHRIS FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE THESE GREAT BOTTLES.

 

Philip Gardner and Christopher F. Brown were involved in a brief partnership from 1846-1848. They were listed as mineral water manufactures at 116 North Howard Street. There bottles are quite scarce and not often seen. I only know of one mold with there name that is a torpedo mold embossed simply GARDNER - & BROWN they are found in several shades of green ranging from apple to citron and odd shades of ginger ale and puce. The all have the standard sharply tapered Baltimore torpedo lip.

ANTIQUE BOTTLES OF BALTIMORE

ON THE RIGHT IS SOME MORE OF THE  GREAT STUFF FROM CHRIS  FROM HIS WEBSITE, I COULDN'T RESIST ADDING.THESE THREE ARE ALL FROM DIFFERENT BOTTLERS BUT YOU CAN SEE THE BALTIMORE LIP STYLE CHRIS MENTIONS ABOVE.

            BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  DR. S.P.TOWNSEND'S SARSAPARILLA ~ ALBANY, N.Y.


THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM THE COLLECTION OF "BOTTLBOY" (CHRIS EIB) AND IS ONE I HAVE BEEN WANTING TO RUN FOR A WHILE. DR. S.P. TOWNSEND'S SARSAPARILLA, ALBANY NEW YORK. THIS ONE IN A SUPER EMERALD GREEN COLOR...SOME DAY I WILL LAND ONE OF THESE MYSELF. I HAVE MANY MORE PICTURES SENT TO ME OF HIS COLLECTION AND SO I WILL BE PUTTING AN ALBUM TOGETHER AND POSTING IT IN MEMBERS ALBUMS PAGE. THANKS BOTTLBOY FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE YOUR GREAT FIND. 

DR. S. P. TOWNSEND'S COMPOUND EXTRACT OF SARSAPARILLA


This Extract is put up in Quart Battles; it is six times cheaper, pleasanier. and warranted superior to any sold. It cures disease without vomiting, purging, sickening or debilitating the Patient. The great beauty and superiority of this Sarsaparilla over all other medicines is, while it eradicates disease, it invigorates the body. It is one of the best
FALL AND WINTER MEDICINES
ever known; it not only purifies the whole system and strengthens the person,but it creates new, pure and rich blood; a power possessed by no other Medicne. And in this lies the grand secret
of its wonderful success. It has performed within the last two years, more than one hundred thousand cures of severe cases of disease; at least, 50,000 were considered iucuruhl-e. It has saved the lives of more than 5,000 children the two past seasons. 10,000 cases of General Debility and want of Nervous Energy,
Dr. Townsend's Sarsaparilla invigorates the whole system p-rmanetly To who have lost their muscular energy, by the effects of medicine, or indirecrction comittcd in youth, or the excessive
indulgence ot the passions, and brought on by
prostration of the nervous system, lassitude, want of ambition, fainting and mature decay and decline, hastening towards that fatal disease, Consumption, never entirely restored by this
pleasant remedy. This Sarsaparilla is far superior any
INVIGORATING- CORDIAL,
As it renews and invigorates the system, gives activity to the limbs, and strength to the muscular system in a most extraordinary degree.
CONSUMPTION CURED!
Cleanse and Strengthen ! Consumption can be cured!! Bronchitis. Consumption. Liver Complaint. Colds. Cataarh, Coughs. Asthma. Spitting
of Blood, Soreness in the Chest. Hectic Flush. Night Sweats, Difficult or Profuse Expectoration, Pain in the Side, & chest have been and can be cured.
SPITTING BLOOD.
Dr. Townsend—reaily believe your Sarsaparilla has been the means through Providence, of saving my life. I have for several years had a bad Cough It became worse and worse. At last I raised
large qualities of Blood, had night sweats, and was greatly debilitated and reduced, and did not expect to live. 1 have only used your Sarsaparilla a short time, and there has a wonderful change been wrought in me. I am now able to walk all over the city. I raise no blood, and my cough has left me. You can well imagine that 1 am thankful for th«jse results.
Your obedient servant,   WM RUSSEL, 65 Catherine st.
FEMALE MEDICINE.
Dr. S. P. Townsend's Sarsaparilla is a sovereign and speedy cure for Incipient Consumption Barrenness, Prolapsus, Uteri or Falling of the Womb, Costivenes*, Piles, Leucurrhma, or Whites,
obstructed or difficult Menstruation, Incontinence of Urine, or involuntary discharge thereof, and for the general prostration of the system—no matter whether the result ofinhereui cause or  causes, produced by irregularity, illness or accident. Nothing can be more surprising than its invigorating effects upon the huiiian frame. Persons of all weakness and lassitude, from taking it. at  once become robust and full of energy under its influence. It immediately counteracts the nerverlessnpss of the femnle frame, which is the great cause of Barreuuess. It will not bo expected of  Uh, in canes of so delicate a nature, to exhibit cei lificatus of cures performed, but we can assure the afflicted, that hundreds of cases have been reported to us. Thousands of cases where  families have been without children, after using a few bottles of this invaluable medicine, have been blessed with fine, healthy offspring.
MEDICINES.
Look out for Imitations and Counterfeits. None are genuine unless they are signed by S. P. Townsend, and are put up in wrappers printed with a splendid Steel Flute engraved Label.   PROOF!! PROOF!!!
Here is proof conclusive that Dr. S. P. Townsend's Sarsaparilla is the original. The following is from oonie of tho moot respectable and influential Pupers in the State.
FROM THE ALBANY EVENING ATLAS.
Dr. S. P, Townsend's Sarsaparilla. There probably has never been so popular a remedy, or patent medicine, as Dr. S. P. Townsend's Sarsaparilla, which was originally, and continues to be manufactured in this city, at first by the 
Doctor himself, and afterwards for several year* and to the present time, by Clapp & Townsend, the present proprietors. Since the partnership was formed, the Doctor has resided in New York,  where he keep* a store, and attends to the business that accumulates at that point. The manufactory i* in this city, and is conducted by the junior partner, Mr. Clapp—here all the medicine is manufactured. Few of our citizens have any idea of the amount of this medicine that is manufactured and sold. Besides the sales in this country, it is shipped to the Canadas, West India Inlands, South America, and even to Europe, in considerable quantities. At the manufactory they employ a steam engine, besides a large number of men, women and girls in the preparaton of the medicine, making boxes, printing, &c, and turn out, ready for shipment, over 400 dozen per day,or nearly 5000 bottles. This is an enormous quantity.The great sale the medicine has acquired, has induced a number of men to get up imitations, and there is at the present time, other medicines for sale, that are caller! " Dr. Townsend'* Sarsaparilla." One in particular started a short time ago in New York, is called "Old Dr. Jacob Townsend's Sarsaparilla,'' and apparently with a view, by dint of advertising, and the usual agencies resorted to in such efforts, to appropriate tlie name of Dr. S P. Townsend's great remedy, and thus gain all the advantages resulting from the popularity of the nainw, which be has acquired for it by years of patient and expensive labors. Dr. S. P. Townsend, formerly of this city, a* is well known here, is the inventor and original proprietor of the medicine known as " Dr. Townsend's Sarsaparilla," and we think those persons who arc attempting to yell their article us the original, should be exposed.
FROM THE NEW YORK DAILY SUN.
Dr. Townsend's extraordinary advertisement, which occupies an entire page of the Sun. will not escape notice. Dr. S. P. Townsend, who is the original proprietor of Dr. Townsend's Sarsaparilla,
and whose office is next door to ours, where he has been for several years, is driving an immense business. lie receives no less than four hundred dozen of Sarsaparilla per day and even this enormous quantity does not supply the demand. No medicine ever gained so great a pooulaiity as his preparation of Sarsaparilla. His edition of Almanack* for 1849 cost $-22,000, and he has paid the New York Sun for advertising, in the last four years, over $10,000, and he acknowledges that it is the cheapest advertising he has had done. This medicine is exported to the Canadas, West lndies, South America and Europe in considerable quantities, and is coining into general use in those countries, as well as here.
NOTICE OF REMOVAL.
Dr. S, P. Townsend's Principal New-York Office, Has been Removed from 126 Fulton-street to 82 Nassau-circle,In the Building formerly occupied by the South Baptist Church, between Fulton and John Sts: the old otfiet- being too small for our business and the accommodation of our Customer*. The
Public are invited to call and sec our new office, (not to purehase Sarsaparilla) which is one of the most magnificent and beautiful Rooms in tne United States The ladies are particularly requested to examine the decorations of the walls; we will supply them with Cards of the Artists if' they choose.Strangers, and especially Country Merchants who wi.sh to make appointments with their freinds, can do so at our office, and will be furnished with Desks, Ink, and Paper gratis, with pleasure

 

BOTTLES OF THE WEEK ED & LUCY'S "TEA KETTLE INKS" 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOTTLES OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF ED AND LUCY FAULKNER. ANYONE, INCLUDING MYSELF WHO COLLECTS OR HAS ANY INTEREST IN INKS AND THE INK RELATED....HAS HEARD OF THE FAULKNERS. LUCY WAS KIND ENOUGH TO SEND ME THESE AMZING LOOKING AND QUITE RARE INKWELLS. I REALLY LIKE THE STYLE AND CLASS OF THESE. HERE IS A LINK TO THEIR INK COLLECTING SITE    ANTIQUE BOTTLES & INKS  BE SURE TO CHECK IT OUT. THANK YOU ED & LUCY, GREAT STUFF.

"My wife and I have been collecting antique bottles (mostly inks & related ephemera) for around 20 years and have thoroughly enjoyed the hobby and the people we have met along the way. Many of these people we now count among our closest friends."

I ASKED LUCY ABOUT THE MAKER, KNOWING FROM MY OWN EXPERIENCE HOW HARD IT IS TO ATTACH A MAKER TO THESE SMALL PIECES OF ART.

Lucy

"No info on maker. Teakettles without any name or patent date, or see in a glass catalog, there is no way of knowing the origin. When I bought the purple one several years ago, there was "talk" of it could possibly be Sandwich.  My feeling is whoever made it, made it special with the top piece just for show. Only a few are known in this style and none I know of in amethyst. In order to get it, I traded a lot of labeled inks to a collector who did not like teakettles that much. But I really like it. The green I got from Don Carroll at the York show a few years ago. Lucy."

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK EXTREMELY RARE COBALT BLUE FISH BITTERS

I HAVE BEEN FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO HAVE FELLOW COLLECTORS ALLOW ME TO SHARE SOME GREAT BOTTLES HERE ON  BOTTLE OF THE WEEK, AND I AM VERY HAPPY TO BE ABLE TO SHARE THIS WEEKS BOTTLE FROM  FERDINAND AND ELIZABETH MEYERS (AN EDITOR FOR FOHBC) AMAZING COLLECTION OF GLASS. I AM ADDING LINKS TO THEIR GREAT WEBSITE, PEACHRIDGE GLASS, ALSO THEIR FACEBOOK PAGE. PLEASE TAKE SOME TIME AND CHECK  THEM OUT, INCREDIBLE IS AN UNDERSTATMENT.

AS WE COLLECTORS ALL KNOW, WHEN IT COMES TO PROVENANCE OF OUR FINDS IT IS VERY HARD TO OBTAIN OR VERIFY ON MANY OF OUR FINDS. SO WHEN YOU CAN GET THE PROVENANCE OF A GREAT BOTTLE LIKE THIS ONE OFF COBALT FISH BITTERS BOTTLE....WELL,IT JUST DOESN'T GET ANY BETTER.  I HAVE POSTED BELOW THE WRITE UP ON IT FROM PEACHRIDGE GLASS SITE, I WANT TO THANK FERDINAND FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE HIS AMAZING BOTTLE WITH EVERYONE.

PEACHRIDGE GLASS

PEACHRIDGE ON FACEBOOK

"As you may be aware, I was fortunate enough to obtain the classic Cobalt Blue Fish Bitters recently in a private transaction. This bottle came from the Don Keating
collection thru an intermediary. This addition to my collection was very public and I believe created much positive publicity because I chose to be open and display
the bottle on my table at the Pomona National FOHBC Show this past August.With the publicity generated, this opened the doors for gathering information about this bottle. Through discussions and e-mails I have been able to gather the following valuable information to digest:

1) During the recent FOHBC Show, a trusted collector shared that this same bottle was discovered many years ago in Waupaca, Wisconsin on a farm. The bottle was being used to feed Liniment to a horse. A bottle collector discovered this and purchased the bottle for $500.00 and flipped it for $1,000.00. During the open Bitters Forum at the show, other collectors shared stories of the next series of owners.

2) The elusive owner of the only other known Blue Fish bitters contacted me and confirmed that their bottle lip is offset, ie. R/H F46. The owner looked at it again at my request and in good light and with a magnifying glass confirmed that there is no ?The Fish Bitters? embossing on the gills. Their bottle has a sheared lip. They further stated that their bottle ?came from Elvin Moody (Ohio) many years ago? and that ?he had purchased it at a Skinner's auction in Bolton Mass. in the mid 80's? he believed.

3) From another e-mail, ?That fish appeared at the 1976 EXPO in St. Louis. I recall that the rumor then was that it had been purchased for the princely sum of $5,000.00.  "The good old days?.

4) Howard Crowe sent me a nice handwritten letter and two (2) photographs of Tony Shank's collection. One of the pictures depicts the blue fish bitters with the Sazarac?s and Old Homesteads blue bitters in the Shanks den window. Howard as he notes, was a rookie collector in the early 80?s and was invited, along with his good friend, Tom Lines to see the Shank collection which included the 3 blue bitters. Howard further goes on to say ?looking at all those beautiful bottles was a day I will never forget?.

 

  5) Bill Ham adds in a recent e-mail that he believes that someone, possibly Chuck Moore, may have brokered the deal that passed the 3 blue bitters from Tony Shanks to Don Keating."

"The big question, at least to me, is whether the 3 blue bitters will ever be together again as they have for decades. With the Homie in Denver with Sandor and the Ladies Leg in Oregon with Bill, it seems unlikely in the near future. You can bet that the three of us talk frequently about this possibility."

THE OTHER FISH BITTERS IN THE COLLECTION, BOTH OFFSET NECK AND STRAIGHT....WOW. BE SURE TO GO TO PEACHRIDGE GLASS AND SEE THE REST OF THIS COLLECTION.

 

 

                               BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  RARE W.H. WOOD ~ DURHAM

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF DAVID PARKIN FROM CONSETT A SMALL TOWN NEAR COUNTY DURHAM. 

 W.H. WOOD ~ DURHAM WITH AN EMBOSSED PICTURE OF THE DURHAM CATHEDRAL, I FOUND THE INFORMATION. DAVID ALSO HAS A VERY NICE STONEWARE GINGER VARIANT FROM MR WOOD AS PICTURED BELOW. THANK YOU DAVID, GREAT STUFF AND GREAT BOTTLE OF THE WEEK.

I RECEIVED THE INFORMATION BELOW AS STATED FROM THE GREAT GRAND DAUGHTER OF MR.WOODS, I APPRECIATE IT VERY MUCH, I ALSO THINK IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT THESE ARTIFACTS ARE BEING PRESERVED BY DAVID,MYSELF AND COUNTLESS OTHER BOTTLE COLLECTORS AS SO MANY ARE COVERED UP BY BUILDINGS AND PARKING LOTS WITH NO REGARD AT ALL TO THEIR HISTORICAL IMPORTANCE.

"I am Councillor William Henry Wood's great granddaughter. I am emailing to correct you on the information supplied in this post..

He was born in or near Bedlington in Northumberland, and moved to Durham in 1890 with his wife Annie.

In 1891 he started Wood & Watson Ltd, mineral water manufacturers in Gilesgate, Durham.

He was twice mayor of the city in 1909/10 and 1919/20 (as pictured).

The W.H. Wood Memorial Cup was given by his family to Durham City in 2008 and is displayed in the Town Hall together with an acknowledgement of his civic services.

Further artifacts and memorabilia of Wood & Watson Ltd may be seen in Durham Heritage Centre." ThanksEllen

 

 

 

 

                  BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  A RARE STEINKE & KORNAHRENS SODA WATER

THIS WEEKS  BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF FRANK BISHOP, ANOTHER RARE BOTTLE. THIS ONE IS FROM SOUTH CAROLINA AND IS FOUND IN A FEW VARIANTS INCLUDING A COUPLE COBALT,GREEN AND THE SUPER RARE BLACK VARIANT. THE LATTER BEING IN THE BLOB TOP HALL OF FAME. EMBOSSED "STEINKE & KORNAHRENS SODA WATER  RETURN THIS BOTTLE  CHARLESTON S.C."  THESE HAVE 8 PANELS AND JUST LOOK AT THE TWIST IN THE NECK ON THIS ONE....AWESOME. THANK YOU FRANK FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE YOUR GREAT BOTTLE, I MANAGED TO FIND SOME INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY, NOT ALOT OUT THERE FOR ADVERTISING ECT.

MORE OF FRANKS PICT'S

 

 

STEINKE & KORNAHRENS SODA WATER RETURN THIS BOTTLE CHARLESTON S.C.

Soda water manufacture started about 1840 in Charleston.  One of the better known of these bottlers was the Kornahrens family.  In 1839, John L. Kornahrens emigrated from Germany with his family and started a grocery business at 24 Line Street in Charleston.  In 1856, he went into the soda water business with Frederick Steinke, a baker at 43 Society Street.  After the Steinke partnership dissolved in 1857, the Kornahrens family stayed involved in soda water manufacture and brewing.  No evidence of soda water manufacture by the Kornahrens family can be traced during the Civil War.  However they did continue in the grocery business and did continue to brew beer, ale, and stout.  In 1866, Carl L. Kornahrens started bottling beer and soda water at 40 Hasel Street in Charleston, and for the next fifty years the "CLK" trademark was common in coastal South Carolina.  Carl L. Kornahrens died on June 1, 1888, and the company continued under his wife, Johanna, and his son, Carl L. Jr., apparently going out of business in 1914.

 

               BOTTLE OF THE WEEK RARE REED'S OLD LEXINGTON CLUB WHISKEY

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR IS A RARE REED'S OLD LEXINGTON CLUB WHISKEY FROM THE COLLECTION OF CHRIS CAPLEY {LEXDIGGER} AND AS CHRIS SAYS, THERE HAVE BEEN A FEW COME OUT OF THE GROUND IN THE PAST YEARS BUT THEY ARE FAR AND IN BETWEEN AND COMMAND BIG MONEY IN THIS CONDITION. I FOUND A VERY INTERESTING COURT CASE I POSTED BELOW WHICH GIVES A LOT OF DETAIL ABOUT THIS COMPANY. THANKS CHRIS FOR LETTING ME SHARE YOUR VERY COOL BOTTLE, CHRIS DUG THIS,I CAN JUST ABOUT PICTURE THE DANCE THAT WAS DONE...GREAT STUFF!!

 Old Lexington Club Distilling Co. V. Kentucky DistilLeries & Warehouse Co.
(234 Fed. Rep., 464)
United States District Court, District of New Jersey
              August 1,1916

1. Trade-mark—Registration—Suit In Equity.
A suit will lie under section 4915 revised statutes to obtain registration of a trade-mark improperly refused by the patent office.
2. Trade-mark—Descriptive And Geographical Terms.
The words "Old Lexington Club" as applied to whisky are neither geographical on the one hand, nor descriptive on the other, and should not be refused registration on these grounds.
3. Trade-mark—Infringement—Laches—Bar To Registration.
Where the owner of a trade-mark is aware of the use of its mark by another, but fails during upwards of fifteen years to assert its right thereto, permitting the later user to build up a business under the mark much more extensive than its own, the owner of the mark is estopped from acquiring the prima facie title to the mark conferred by registration.
4. Trade-mark—Registration—Ground For Refusal.
Since registration under the statute is prima facie evidence of ownership, it should not be granted to one who is estopped from asserting an exclusive right to the mark.
In equity. On final hearing. Bill of complaint dismissed. For opinion on demurrer to bill of complaint, see Reporter, vol. 6, p. 454.
John M. Coit, of Washington, D. C, for plaintiff.
Hal C. Bangs, of Chicago, Ill., and Charles C. Deining, of
   New York City, for defendant.

Haight, District Judge. The plaintiff, claiming to be the owner of a trade-mark for whisky, consisting of the words "Old Lexington Club," filed an application in the patent office for the registration thereof, pursuant to Act Feb. 20, 1905, 33 Stat. 724, The defendant opposed the registration upon the ground that it was the owner of a trade-mark for whisky consisting of the words "Lexington Club," and that a trade-mark so similar to it as "Old Lexington Club" would be likely to cause confusion or mistake in the mind of the public and thus injure the defendant. The examiner, to whom the question thus raised was referred, found priority in adoption and use in the plaintiff. The defendant thereupon appealed to the commissioner, who affirmed the judgment of the examiner. Thereafter the defendant prosecuted an appeal to the court of appeals of the District of Columbia, which reversed the former judgments, upon the grounds (1) that the proposed trademark consisted merely of the name of the plaintiff corporation; and (2) that it was but a combination of words in ordinary use as descriptive adjectives—"Lexington" being geographical, and "Club" descriptive of quality or grade. Kentucky Distilleries & Warehouse Co. v. Old Lexington Club Distilling Co., 31 App. D. C. 223. About a year after that decision was rendered the plaintiff filed this bill; the authority for doing so being section 4915 of the Revised Statutes (Comp. St. 1913, § 9460), and section 9 of the Trade-Mark Act of 1905 (Comp. St. 1913, § 9494). Atkins v. Moore, 212 U. S. 285, 29 Sup. Ct. 390, 53 L. Ed. 515. A demurrer was interposed to the bill, but the same was overruled by the late Judge Cross. The defendant does not here urge the first of the grounds relied upon by the court of appeals of the District of Columbia, presumably both because Judge Cross held that the proposed trade-mark did not appear to consist merely of the name of a corporation, and because, subsequent to the decision of the court of appeals, the Trade-Mark Act was amended to provide that the registration of a trade-mark, otherwise registerable, should not be denied because of its being the name of an applicant or a portion thereof. Act Feb. 18, 1911, c. 113, 36 Stat. 918; Act Jan. 8, 1913, c. 7, 37 Stat. 649 [Comp. St. 1913, § 9490].
The second ground relied upon by the court of appeals is, however, advanced in this case. Whatever may have been before that court, there is no evidence in the record here to justify the conclusion that the word "Club," as applied to liquors, is indicative of quality or grade, but, on the other hand, the only evidence is to the contrary. It does not appear, therefore, that this word has acquired in the liquor trade a generic meaning. While the word "lyexington," standing alone, might denote the geographical origin of a product, and hence not be the subject of exclusive appropriation as a trade-mark, it by no means follows that its use, in combination with other words, would denote simply the place of manufacture. As the word "Club" does not indicate the quality or grade, and as social clubs are not engaged in the manufacture of liquor, I fail to see how the words "Old Lexington Club" can, in any sense, be considered as signifying that the product so marked was manufactured at Lexington, Ky., or as indicating its quality or characteristics, or be viewed as anything other than a fanciful designation, arbitrarily selected to designate the product of plaintiff and its predecessors. If the phrase were "Old I^exington Whisky," a different situation would probably be presented.
These views, I think, are in harmony with those expressed by Mr. Justice Pitney in the recent case of Hamilton-Brown Shoe Co. v. Wolf Brothers & Co., 240 U. S. 251, 36 Sup. Ct. 269 [Reporter, vol. 6, p. 169]. The words "Maryland Club," as applied to whisky, were evidently considered as a valid trade-mark by both Judge Hough and the circuit court of appeals of the second circuit in Thomas G. Carroll A- Son Co. v. Mcllvaine & Baldwin (C. C.) 171 Fed. 125; Thomas J. Carroll & Son Co. v. Same, 183 Fed. 22, 105 C. C. A. 314. To the same effect is Cahn v. Gottschalk, 2 N. Y. Supp. 13. See, also, Heublein v. Adams (C. C. Mass.) 125 Fed. 782. The case of Cahn v. Hoffman House, 9 Misc. Rep. 461, 28 N. Y. Supp. 388, relied upon by the circuit court of appeals of the District of Columbia, is not persuasive in this case, because it does not here appear, as it did there (according to the opinion), that the word "Club," when applied to various kinds of liquor, has a special meaning indicating grade or quality.
In deciding the remaining questions in the case, the plaintiff's and defendant's respective trade-marks, because of their marked similarity, may well be considered as identical. It was found by the examiner, as well as the commissioner, that the plaintiff and its predecessors have used the trade-mark, which is sought to be registered, on their products since the year 1874. In this respect their findings were evidently concurred in by the court of appeals of the District of Columbia. The record in this case also quite conclusively proves its adoption and use by plaintiff's predecessors in the year 1874 or 1875. In 1876 Reed, who originated it, registered one of the labels used by him in the patent office. Copies of newspapers published in Lexington, Ky., in 1876 and 1877, show advertisements of "Reed's Old Lexington Club Hand-Made Sour Mash" whisky. Admittedly the use by the defendant and its predecessors of the words "Lexington Club" does not antedate 1878. Undoubtedly, therefore, plaintiff's predecessors were the first to adopt and to use the designation in question as a trade-mark for whisky.
Nor have I any doubt that the plaintiff has acquired title to the same. It was first adopted and used by J. H. Reed, who was in business by himself for a few months, and then with one Jackson, and later with one Warner. During all of this time it was used by these various firms. Subsequently Warner & Reed became financially embarrassed, and their business was taken over by one of their creditors, from whom the present plaintiff, in 1890, acquired, not only the distillery which formerly belonged to and was operated by Warner & Reed, but all of the latter's stock, trademarks, etc. The name has been used by plaintiff continuously since that time, as it was likewise used during the time the business was operated by the creditors of Warner & Reed. It appears that in 1878 the words "Lexington Club" were adopted by Freiberg & Workum, who were engaged in the wholesale liquor business at Cincinnati, as a trade-name for certain whisky which was distilled by them at Petersburg, Ky. They operated that distillery and used the trade-mark on their products continuously until 1899, when both the distillery and the trade-mark were sold to the present defendant. Their sales of whisky so branded extended over a large territory and were of considerable volume. Originally Reed did not distill any of the whisky which he sold under the name of "Old Lexington Club," but purchased it. His sales were small and within a limited territory. The sales by Warner & Reed, while more extensive, were nothing like as great at any time as were those of Freiberg & Workum. At the most, they sold, outside of Lexington, Ky., only in New York, Chicago, St. Louis, and Cincinnati, while Freiberg & Workum's sales were made in practically every state in the Union.
Admittedly, the use by the latter of the words "Lexington Club" on whisky manufactured by them was known to the defendant as early as 1890, about the time the plaintiff corporation was formed. Reed knew of it some three or four years after he failed, which was in 1881, and although his knowledge may not be charged to the plaintiff or its predecessors, it is evidence of the fact that the use by Freiberg & Workum was generally known in the liquor trade, as the amount and extent of their sales would seem to clearly indicate that it must have been. Yet no steps were taken during all of the years intervening between then and 1905 to enjoin such use; nor was any remonstrance made against it. No excuse for the delay is advanced. In the last-mentioned year, a suit was brought in the state courts of Ohio, but apparently was abandoned. During this time the defendant and its predecessors were building up a large business, greater and more extensive territorially than that of the plaintiff and its predecessors, and, necessarily, acquiring a reputation for the products which they manufactured and sold under the trade-name of "Lexington Club." The designation in question, therefore, has come to denote in the public mind the products of the defendant and its predecessors equally as well as, if not more so than, those of the plaintiff and its predecessors. In this sense it is equally the trade-mark of both.
It is urged by the defendant that under these circumstances the plaintiff should not be permitted to register its mark over the objection of the defendant. If the same principles are applicable to an action of this kind as would be applicable to a suit by the present plaintiff to enjoin the use by the defendant of the words "Lexington Club," I think that defendant's contention is sound. I cannot see that this phase of the case can be distinguished on principle from the decision of the circuit court of appeals of this circuit in Pflugh v. Eagle White Lead Co., 185 Fed. 769,107 C. C. A. 659 [Reporter, vol. 1, p. 101], nor from that of the circuit court of appeals of the second circuit in Carroll & Son Co. v. Mcllvaine, 183 Fed. 22,105 CCA. 314. In the first of these cases it was said that the continued, persistent, and adverse use of the trade-mark by the defendant, to plaintiff's knowledge, during fourteen years, showed an abandonment of an exclusive claim by the plaintiff, and on such abandonment new rights had, in the meanwhile, arisen on the part of the public. It was held that under such circumstances it would be inequitable to arrest, at that late date, the defendant's trade, which had, with the plaintiff's knowledge, been built up upon its trademark. In the latter case, although the plaintiff had established the prior useof the designation "Baltimore Club" as applied to whiskies, it was held that a delay of nearly twenty years, after knowledge of the use of the same designation by the defendant and its predecessors, to prevent such latter use, was laches, which would disentitle the plaintiff to an injunction against defendant's use, at least in the territory where the defendant had always used the trade-name and where the plaintiff had not competed with it. True, in each of these cases there were other circumstances mentioned in the opinions; but they in no way affected the decisions on the point in question. To the same effect is Vaholine Oil Co. v. Havoline Oil Co. (D. C. S. D. N. Y.) 211 Fed. 189, 194 [Reporter, vol. 4, p. 257].
Although it was said by the Supreme Court in McLean v. Fleming, 96 U. S. 245, at page 253, 24 L. Ed. 828, that equity courts will not, in general, refuse an injunction on account of delay in seeking relief, where the proof of infringement is clear, and although this doctrine was expressly reaffirmed in Menendez v. Holt, 12S U. S. 514, 523, 524, 9 Sup. Ct. 143, 145 (32 L. Ed. 526), yet Mr. Chief Justice Fuller said, in the latter case:
"At the same time, as it is in the exercise of discretionary jurisdiction that the doctrine of reasonable diligence is applied, and those who seek equity must do it, a court might hesitate as to the measure of relief, where the use, by others, for a long period, under assumed permission of the owner, had largely enhanced the reputation of a particular brand. But there is nothing here in the nature of an estoppel—nothing which renders it inequitable to arrest at this stage any further invasion of complainants' rights."
These remarks were considered by the circuit court of appeals in the Eagle White Lead suit as a recognition of the doctrine that one will be held to be estopped to assert an exclusive right to a trade-mark when it would be inequitable to permit him to do so.
In Saxlehner v. Eisner & Mendelson Co., 179 U. S. 19, 37, 21 Sup. Ct. 7, 14 (45 L. Ed. 60), it was held that the failure of one for twenty years to seek to prevent others in this country, although such efforts had been made abroad, from using a trade-name, was such laches as prevented relief, although there was no proof of actual knowledge of infringements in this country, Mr. Justice Brown remarking:
"By twenty years of inaction she was permitted the use of the word Ijv numerous other importers, and it is now too late to resuscitate her original title."
French Republic v. Saratoga Vichy Co., 191 U. S. 427, 436, H Sup. Ct. 145, 48 L. Ed. 247, is to the same effect.
It would, in my judgment, be most inequitable to interfere with the defendant's trade under the circumstances of this case. The plaintiff has known of the defendant's use of its trade-name, and has taken no steps whatsoever to prevent it for at least fifteen years, during all of which time defendant has been building up its business, which is far greater and more extensive than that of the plaintiff. For one to permit another to build up a reputation for one's goods under a trade-name for a long period of time, and then to assert an exclusive right to that name, and thereby acquire the benefit of the reputation and trade which the other has built up, when it lay in the power of the former at any time to have ariested the use of the trade-name by the latter, seems to me most inequitable, because, if the right had been asserted before the reputation was acquired, the infringer could have adopted another name and built his reputation on it. It would also tend to further deception upon the public, one of the results which injunctive relief in trade-mark cases seeks to prevent. Of course, if one knowingly and willfully adopts a name which has been used by another, a different situation might be presented. Such a case would exhibit actual fraud, and such, I think, is the distinguishing feature between cases such as this and Menendez v. Holt, supra. See Saxlekner v. Eisner & Mendelson, supra, 179 U. S. 39, 21 Sup. Ct. 7, 45 L. Ed. 60. But nothing of that kind appears in this case.
It remains, therefore, to consider whether such a defense is applicable to this kind of a suit. The statute provides that the registration of a trade-mark "shall be prima facie evidence of ownership." Section 16. Section 6 permits any one who believes he would be damaged by the registration of a trade-mark to oppose the same. This latter section has been construed to mean, and I think properly so, that the objector must show such interest in the proposed trade-mark that damage may be inferred. BattleCreek v. Fuller, 30 App. D. C. 411; Underwood v. Dick, 36 App. D. C. 175 [Reporter, vol. 1, p. 35].
It is urged by the plaintiff that as it has shown a prior adoption and use of the mark, and as the registration thereof would be only prima facie evidence of ownership, the defendant could not be damaged by the registration, because it would have the same right to assert the defense, which it now urges, in any suit which might be brought for an infringement of the trade-mark so registered, as if it were not registered. There are, I think, several answers to this contention. In the first place I think that the principle under which relief is denied in the cases before mentioned is that the one asserting the exclusive right, although he had such a right at one time, no longer has it, either on the theory that the right has been lost, or that he is estopped from asserting it, or from denying that it has been abandoned. The latter was considered by the circuit court of appeals of the Eighth Circuit in Layton Pure Food Co. v. Church & Dwight, 182 Fed. 35, 41, 104 C. C. A. 475, 32 L. R. A. (N. S.) 274, and apparently by the circuit court of appeals of this circuit in the Eagle White Lead suit, supra, to be the principle underlying such cases.
Under any of these theories the defendant would be damaged by the registration of the trade-mark, because it would confer upon the plaintiff a right to which it is not entitled, and which it could assert against the defendant, namely, a prima facie title. Further, it would seem to be ridiculous for a court to direct the registration of a trade-mark over the opposition of another, when, under the facts presented, it would not permit the owner of the trade-mark the exclusive right to use the same as against the other. In addition, I can readily see that damage would result to the defendant if the plaintiff were permitted to register this trade-mark, because in any suit hereafter brought against the defendant for infringement thereof the burden of disproving the plaintiff's title to the trade-mark as against the defendant would be cast upon the latter. Finally, the trade-mark in question, because of its similarity to that of the defendant and the circumstances before mentioned, is as much the defendant's trade-mark as it is the plaintiff's. This view, I think, is in harmony with that line of cases which hold that one may have a trade-mark in one section and another the same mark in a different section. Hanoter Star Milling Co. v. Allen & Wheeler Co., 208 Fed. 513, 125 C. C. A. 515 [Reporter, vol. 3, p. 521]; Carroll v.McIlvaine,supra; Levy v. Waitt, 61 Fed. 1008, 10 C. C. A. 227, 25 L. R. A. 190 (C. C. A. 1st Cir.).
It follows, therefore, that plaintiff is not entitled to have this trade-mark registered, and hence that the bill should be dismissed, with costs.

 

                             BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR   RARE N. WAYT  STAUNTON VA.


 THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM THE COLLECTION OF SCOTT (SODAPOPKID) BERRY. THIS IS A FIRST FOR BOTTLE OF THE WEEK, A FAVORITE RARE BOTTLE PASSED FROM ONE COLLECTION TO ANOTHER AND SUBMITTED FOR BOTTLE OF THE WEEK. i'M OK WITH THAT. SCOTT HAS A FAMILY CONNECTION TO THE WAYT FAMILY...READ UP ON THIS BOTTLE BELOW AND THANKS FOR STOPPING BY, THANK SCOTT.

it so happens that my 27th or 28th cousin Abraham Lincoln has something to do with this bottle. it was dug on the Marry Surrat property. where they hung an innocent woman(marry) for having a meeting in her house to kill A. Lincoln. they found out later she knew nothing about the meeting . john wilkes booth was at the meeting , who later shot Lincoln as we all know

 

J. HOWARD WAYT, a prominent druggist of Staunton, Va., died on the morning of the 13th inst., the cause of his death being pneumonia. Mr. Wayt was 55 years of age, a native of Waynesboro, and had lived in Staunton since 1853. In 1868 he formed a partnership with his brother, Newton Wayt, under the firm name of N. Wayt & Bro. Mr. Wayt never married. He took a prominent part interest in the affairs of the Masonic fraternity, being among the best known members of the order In the State, and was esteemed far and wide for his many estimable qualities, among them kind-heartedness and generosity.1901 

1888 'dr. N. Wayt and J. H. Wayt, of Staunton, Va., and J. F. Christian have purchased the control of the Roanoke Street Railway Co., and in a few months will build and equip about four miles of track
THE WAYT FAMILY.
The first of this family who emigrated from England to Va. was George Wayt, who settled in Orange county, circa 1750. He had three sons, namely: i. John; 2 William ; 3. James. John, the eldest son, removed to Augusta about 1790, and m Susan, a d of Joseph Bell, by whom he left no issue. He was a distinguished Mason, merchant, and Mayor of the town. He was an eminently good and pious man, being an Elder in the Staunton Presbyterian Church. William Wayt m Miss Hodges, of Caroline county, and left one son, John Wayt, and three daughters. John Wayt removed to Augusta in 181i. He married twice: first, Margaret A Bell, d of James Bell, by whom he left issue, one daughter, who m Robt J. Porterfield, by whom she left issue, one son. She m secondly Johnston E. Bell, of Lewisburg, and left three children, one son and two daughters. John Wayt m second Sarah A. Bell, d. of Maj. Wm. Bell, of Lewis creek, and left issue at his death in Staunton in 1877, three children: 1. Dr. Newton Wayt; 2. J. Howard Wayt; 3. Mattie, who m Thos. A. Bledsoe, Cashier Nat. V. Bank, Slaunton, and they have issue, two daughters, S. Bell and Mary Lou Bledsoe.
Dr. Newton Wayt m Julia B., a d of Wade H. Heiskell, and has issue, two sons and one daughter, viz: i. Baldwin; 2. Hampton; 3. Mattie. J. Howard Wayt is unmarried.
John Wayt, was long a magistrate of the county, an elder in the churches in Waynesboro and Staunton, and was for years a leading merchant and banker. He had a strong mind, great industry and enterprise. He enjoyed the confidence, respect and esteem of the community, and died beloved and regretted by the entire public.
In 1863 he was an assisant sergon for Dr. Hay at the Staunton General and Recieving Hospital and tended the wounded that were retreating from the battle of Gettysburg.
Born 1837
He died on Sunday, September 18, 1904 Dr. Newton Wayt, in the sixty-eighth year of his age.
He Started his Drug Store in Staunton in 1866

                                    BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  WISHARTS PINE TREE CORDIAL


BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  A WISHARTS PINE TREE CORDIAL, FROM MARK PETERS COLLECTION, HE GOT THIS ONE AT THE SARATOGA SHOW 2011, WHAT A GREAT BOTTLE THIS IS WITH CRISP EMBOSS AND SUPER CLEAN. I FOUND THIS GREAT WRITE UP FROM DR. CANNON AS NOTED IN CREDITS.THANKS MARK, GREAT FIND

WISHARTS PINE TREE CORDIAL ~ Dr. L.Q.C. Wishart at No. 10 South Second Street, Philadelphia, compounded Pine Tree Tar Cordial and introduced it to the public in 1859. He soon moved to larger facilities at No. 232 North Second Street. About 1861, he placed Dr. Wishart’s Great American Dyspepsia Pills on the market and in 1865, Dr. Wishart’s Worm Sugar Drops. The latter was advertised in 1875 in Harper’s Weekly. I am not aware of embossed bottles. Wishart’s son Henry R. inherited the Pine Tree Tar Cordial about 1870, and soon sold it to Philadelphia druggists Harry C. Campion and his son John W. John’s brother Franklin joined them, and the firm was called the Campion Brothers until 1897, when Franklin retired. J.W. Campion and Co. was still selling Pine Tree Tar Cordial into the nineteen hundreds. It was for "Consumption of the Lungs, Cough, Sore Throat and Breast, Bronchitis, Liver Complaint, Blind and Bleeding Piles, Asthma, Whooping Cough and Diphtheria, & c.".
Caspar Wistar compounded the original Balsam of Wild Cherry. Isaac Butts, and apothecary near Canterbury, Conn., used the formula in the 1830s, and an 1841 ad indicates that Williams and Company of Philadelphia, prepared it. Isaac Butts, now at 25 Fulton St., New York, had become the sole owner, according to an ad dated December 21, 1843. By the mid 1840s, Benjamin Sanford and John D. Park of Cincinnati, had become agents for at least part of the country. After 1850, the listing was only John D. Park, dealer in patent medicines. His role as an agent for Wistar’s Balsam of Wild Cherry may have ended due to a financial strain, because by 1856, the medicine had come under control of Seth Fowle of Boston; this lasted into the 1880s. Since there are many later bottles with IB. embossed, Fowle probably had IB. bottles produced long after the original relationship with Isaac Butts had ended. Dr. Wistar’s Balsam of Wild Cherry was advertised as the "Great Remedy for Coughs, Colds, Whooping Cough, Bronchitis, Difficulty of Breathing, Asthma, Hoarseness, Sore Throat, Croup and every affection of the Throat, Lungs and Chest, including even Consumption".
A well known fact is that if children didn’t get colds and coughs so frequently, many more general pediatricians would be unemployed. Upper respiratory tract infections and their complications have been the "bread and butter" for Drs. Wishart, Wistar and Cannon all of these years.....

Thanks to the Medicine Chest and Dr.Richard Cannon

References:
1. Baldwin, J.K.: Patent and Proprietary Medicine Bottles of the Nineteenth Century, 1973. 2. Blasi, B.: A Bit About Balsams, 1974. 3. Holcombe, H.W.: Weekly Philatelic Gossip, October 15, 1938. 4. Holst, J.: Pontiled Medicine Price Guide, 1998.  5. Richardson, L.C. and C.G.: The Pill Rollers, 1992. 6. Wilson, B. and B.: Nineteenth Century Medicine in Glass, 1971.

                    BOTTLE OF THE WEEK G. VALLANCE BREWERY STONEWARE BEER

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM ANOTHER ONE OF MY ENGLISH FRIENDS, WAYNE WOOD, AND IS A RECENT PICK UP FROM A BOOT SALE, WHAT A GREAT LOOKING STONEWARE THIS IS, VALLANCE SIDMOUTH WITH GREEN TOP AND ORIGINAL BAIL IN TACT. I WISH WE HAD HALF THE GREAT STONEWARES HERE IN THE US THAT ARE FOUND ACROSS THE POND... THANKS FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE YOUR GREAT NEW FIND WAYNE.

Vallance's Sidmouth Brewery 23
TEMPLE STREET
1633 (West Side)
Sidmouth is a small town on the English Channel coast in Devon, South West England. The town lies at the mouth of the River Sid in the East Devon district, 15 miles (24 km) south east of Exeter

Since 1832. Corner site with Brewery Lane.  (Brewery Lane: Named after Vallance’s brewery) Original brewery buildings of painted cob and brick, 3 storeys with rounded corners, brick buttress piers and iron banding to range alone Brewery Lane, some blocked windows and 2-light casements. Low pitch hipped slate roof. The offices and
shop facing Temple Street probably of same date or slightly later: 2 storeys stucco faced on plinth. 3 windows to both floors, heightened recessed sashes glazing bars intact on 1st floor, block sills. Central door of 5 flush panels, one glazed, panelled reveals and soffit, surround with moulded edge panel above and cornice. Another door to right of 4 moulded panels, narrow blind rectangular fanlight. Mid C19 extension of 2 storeys painted brick to north with bargeboard gable to street. 1 large segmental arched 2-light casement each floor. To rear forming west side of yard later C19 brewery buildings: 2 tall narrow red brick blocks with shaped hipped roofs, 2 storey link block between. The tall blocks of 2 segment headed windows, one block with lunette below eaves. Louvred windows with glazing bars.

              BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR  VERY RARE SOUTH CAROLINA DISPENSARY 

 BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  IS FROM REGGIE LYNCH'S COLLECTION AND IS THE RARIST AMBER SOUTH CAROLINA DISPENSARY. THIS IS A GREAT LOOKING BOTTLE AND I DID NOT EVEN KNOW THEY WERE OUT THERE...AS SEEN BELOW RIGHT HE HAS IT NEXT TO A CASPERS WHISKEY (WE SHOULD ALL HAVE ONE OF THOSE TO USE AS A COMPARISON BOTTLE)  I HAVE ADDED REGGIES FACEBOOK PAGE LINK ALONG WITH HIS WEBSITE LINK AND YOU SHOULD CHECK OUT BOTH, THANKS VERY MUCH REGGIE FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE YOUR GREAT FIND.

 Will probably be my "find of the year": amber quart size South Carolina Dispensary whiskey style bottle, showed along side a quart cobalt Casper's Whiskey for comparison.Amber SC Dispensary Quart Whiskey Bottle
Quart size, amber, whiskey style South Carolina Dispensary bottle. Considered the rarest of the amber SC Dispensary bottles. This bottle has everything going for it: rarity, desirability, beauty, and history. This bottle was a recent estate find and has never been on market since it was dug over 30 years ago. Very nice condition with some stain and the lip crack, but no other issues. Needs some more cleaning.

If any questions, contact the owner Reggie at Email:  rlynch@antiquebottles.com
Reggie's site ANTIQUE BOTTLE COLLECTORS HAVEN

Antique Bottle Collectors Haven   FACEBOOK PAGE

The South Carolina Dispensary system was a state-run monopoly on liquor sales in the United States state of South Carolina which operated from 1893 to 1907 statewide and until 1916 in some counties. The system was the brainchild of Governor Benjamin Tillman, a farmer from Edgefield known as “Pitchfork Ben,” who served as governor from 1890-1894 and as a U.S. Senator from 1895 until his death in 1918. This interesting experiment had never before been tried at the state level, and proved to be the last time a state would require all liquor sold within its borders to be bottled and dispensed through state-run facilities.The South Carolina Dispensary system came to be known as “Ben Tillman’s Baby

The Dispensary in operation
 
The monopoly the state created was complete; wholesale and retail sales were controlled by the dispensary system through a state board of control, which consisted of the governor, comptroller general and attorney general. Day-to-day administration was in the hands of a state commissioner appointed by the governor. The commissioner was charged with procuring all liquors that were to be subsequently bottled by the state dispensary and sold to county dispensaries. Preference was to be given to local brewers and distillers. Liquor bottled by the state dispensary was the only liquor to be sold legally in South Carolina. From 1893 to 1900 the bottles used by the dispensary had an embossed design featuring a palmetto tree with crossed logs under the base of the trunk, and from 1900-1907 an overlaying and intertwining S, C and D “script” design replaced the tree design. This was largely because prohibitionists objected to having such a prominent state symbol as the palmetto tree embossed on liquor bottles. The script, or monogram design, remained on dispensary bottles until the end of the system in 1907.
 
End of the Dispensary
 
The corruption of the Dispensary as a political machine alarmed Progressive-era reformers, along with the church element that wanted complete prohibition. The General Assembly passed the Bryce law in 1904 that allowed for counties to choose whether they would allow for the sale of alcohol. Many of the Upstate counties voted to ban the sale of alcohol and it was not too long before the General Assembly discussed the viability of the Dispensary itself. In 1912, the Carey-Cothran law was passed that abolished the State Dispensary and provided for the establishment of dispensaries in every county that chose to remain wet.
 
The counties that operated dispensaries grew prosperous from the revenues generated by the sale of alcohol, but prohibitionist sentiment was irresistible and in 1915 the dry counties sought to end the sale of alcohol throughout the state. A referendum held in the state on the question of prohibition saw two-to-one support from the voters, and the General Assembly subsequently enacted a law in 1916 to ban the sale of alcohol and limit importation from other states.
 
Bottle varieties
 
For the most part, all that remains of the S.C. Dispensary are the (mostly empty) bottles that were made simply to contain alcoholic beverages to be sold and consumed, with no regard to the aesthetics of the bottle or design. The bottles are treasured by collectors not for their beauty of design or color, but more as a link to an intriguing era in history. Today, many bottle collectors enthusiastically seek S.C. Dispensary bottles, which have become fairly scarce in terms of common varieties. A few varieties are exceedingly rare and are worth many thousands of dollars to avid collectors willing to pay the price for them.
 
The most common type of S.C. Dispensary bottle is the “jo-jo” flask, which is a flask with flat panels front and back, rounded shoulders, and a rounding towards the base. These were made and used throughout the life of the dispensary system. Another type of flask, the union flask, was used until the turn of the century, and none were made with the monogram design. Unlike the jo-jo’s, which all bore the legend “SC Dispensary”, unions bore both this and “South Carolina Dispensary”. Half-pint, pint, and one quart cylindrical bottles were also made and used. Stoneware jugs in half-gallon and gallon sizes were also made, some made from clay with the palmetto tree and legend drawn by hand. There are other non-typical bottle types, and some bottles which were not embossed, being marked as a dispensary item by label only. A much sought after item is the two-ounce capacity souvenir commemorative dispensary bottle made for the South Carolina Interstate and West Indian Exposition in Charleston, S.C. which was held in 1901-1902. With different glass color varieties, glass manufacturers, and design nuances, there are many varieties of S.C. Dispensary bottles to be collected. Each S.C. Dispensary bottle is unique due to being blown in a mold by a glassblower, as the Owens AR automatic bottle-making machine was not yet in widespread use.

                  BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  VERY RARE GEORGE WHATMOUGH CHEMIST

Whatmough and Gallagher family members out of doors,  ca 1901     BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  IS A VERY RARE IRREGULAR HEX AND COMES FROM A LOCAL COLLECTION.THIS IS ONE OF ONLY 2 OR 3 OF THESE KNOWN AND IT IS IN MINT CONDITION, EMBOSSED ON THE FRONT PANEL. "GEORGE WHATMOUGH CHEMIST BROOKLYN, NEW YORK" I MANAGED TO FIND SOME INFORMATION ON THE MAN AND ALSO A PICTURE OF HIM AND SOME FRIENDS.

Views of the Department's Manager, George Whatmough ? Necessity of Advertising ? How to Handle Physicians. ... whereby the goods were sold only to those chemists who agree not to sell them below a minimum retail price

PICTURE ABOVE ~ 1901 Clockwise from the upper left: George Whatmough, Frank Berry, Isaac A. Whatmough, Mrs. David Gallagher, Ethel Gallagher Whatmough and Millie Gascoyne Berry. The names are written on the reverse by Howard Gallagher.

 


                               BOTTLE OF THE WEEK R. CLAYTON & SON, BONE SETTER

 THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF ANOTHER ONE OF MY FRIENDS FROM THE U.K., STUART BAILEY WAS KIND ENOUGH TO ALLOW ME SHARE THIS GREAT FIND. R. (ROBERT) CLAYTON & SON  BONE SETTERS  FELLING. THE COMPANY ACTUALLY HAD TWO ADDRESSES, ONE AT CLAYTON HOUSE IN FELLING AND ANOTHER AT 95 ALBERT ROAD IN MIDDLESBROUGH.  I FOUND THIS GREAT ARTICLE DATED 1887 IN THE BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL ON MR. CLAYTON. WE ARE THINKING IT WAS A FORM OF PAIN MEDICINE, BUT NOT SURE AS OF YET. THE OTHER BONESETTER MED FROM THE U.K. IS WILSONS BONESETTER AND I ACTUALLY USED TO HAVE ONE OF THOSE. THE CLAYTON IS MUCH MORE SCARCE. THANKS VERY MUCH STUART FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE YOUR GREAT FIND.

FELLING IS LOCATED CLOSE BY TO GATESHEAD ~ NEWCASTLE IN THE NORTH OF ENGLAND. I FOUND THIS AD BELOW AND ALSO MANAGED TO FIND WHERE MR. CLAYTON IN THE YEAR 1908 WON AWARDS FOR HORSES.

 

Class 71. YELD MARE, FILLY, or GELDING, 8 years old and upwards, 12 hands and under, in hand.—Premiums, £5, £3, and £2.

1st No. 698 John Gray, New Stevenston, Holytown, "Fylde Rosette " (17,327). 2nd No. 694 Robert H. Clayton, Clayton House, Felliiig-on-Tyne, Gelding, "Gnn

Class 68. STALLION, 3 years old and upwards, 12 hands and under,                in hand.—Premiums, £5, £3, and £2. 1st No. 681 Robert H. Clayton, Clayton House, Felling, "Gunnergate Bantam." 2nd No. 682 Mrs J. Lindsay, 153 Dairy Road, Edinburgh, "Orwell Hero."

 THE ARTICLE BELOW IS FROM 1887

MEDICO-LEGAL AND MEDICO-ETHICAL.   A BONE-SETTER IN TROUBLE.
AN adjourned inquest is reported in a local paper at Leadgate on July 20th, relative to the death of a man named Joseph Dawson,
who met with a serious accident through a fall of stone, and who for some time was under the treatment of Robert Clayton, described
as a bone-setter according to this report. Dr. Allan (Leadgate) stated that on June 15th he found Dawson
suffering from a wound and fracture a little above the middle third of the right leg. He treated the injury as a compound wound, and after
reducing the fracturs applied an outside splint. The state of the wound prevented the then application of an inside splint. He afterwards
received intimation that a bone-setter had charge of the case, and considering that the matter was taken out of his hands, discontinued
his visits. Clayton, who said he had practised bone-setting most of his life, deposed that on the 23rd of June he set the leg at Dawson's request. He ordered the application of white-bread poultices twice a day. He took off the splint applied by the medical man and put on two others. He was done with the case, but on the 29th of June he was sent for and found the patient progressing favourably. He partially removed the bandages, cleaned the wound, and removed the cardboard splint, replacing it with a wooden one. Witness explained, in reply to the jury, that the bones were lying on the top of one another, and he eased them a little. He never interfered with the wound.
The patient was seen by Dr. Short, who found the bandages too tightly fixed around the leg, and Dawson would not allow him to
remove the splints without the permission of the bone-setter. Dr. Renton, who was called in, met with a like refusaL Dr. McIntyre, who attended Dawson from the 3rd of July till his death, attributed death to tetanus, or blood-poisoning secondary to the fracture of theleg. He was not aware of the previous history of the case. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.The Coroner, addressing Clayton, said the jury did not attach any criminal culpability to the bone-setter, but they thought that he certainly deserved censure for interfering in a case which had already been treated properly aild scientifically by a duly qualified medicalgentleman. He (Clayton) should not have incurred the responsibility of dealing with such a serious case. He seemed to be under the impression that all he had to do was to say that the medical gentlemen would act in conjunction with him, or vice versd. He would find, however, that medical gentlemen went through a course of training to qualify themselves for the practice; whilst he (Clayton) did not
undergo any such training, and yet practised simply such methods as he had gained, perhaps, by his own experience. There were instances where probably great benefits had been derived from the services of bone-setters, but here was a case of a serious description which puzzled even skilled medical gentlemen-a case which required great care and skilful treatment-and he (Clayton) would rush in and. undertake the treatment according to his own ideas. Unqualified men should Phesitate torun such risks as that. Clayton asked to be allowed to speak, but the Coronor warned him that if he did the consequences might be serious, and added-You have been considerably saved by the candid confession of one of the witnesses, but still, through want of knowledge, you did not treat that case as it ought to have been treated. The patient had received proper treatment for six or eight days before you saw him. There is no direct evidence that your treatment of the fractured limb was so prejudicial as to cause death, and we give you the benefit of the doubt this time, but another time you may not be so fortunate.

          BOTTLE OF THE WEEK A RARE M.C. SANDERSON, DRUGGIST ~ BRADFORD, PA.

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK A RARE M.C. SANDERSON DRUGGIST FROM BRADFORD PENNSYLVANIA. IN AN INCREDIBLE COLOR, AND COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF FELLOW DIGGER JOE BATTONE AND HE WRITES

 "Remarkable things happen now and again. Tom, me, and now Laur are just like most....We try to apply our logic and some luck, mixed with a dash of research now and then to find a fix for our (and you all's) obsession....Antique bottles. Well after a trying weekend of unexpected major home repairs, late Monday, Tom (Penn Digger) borrowed the probe to check out a rental property of a mutual friend....a good thing, permission....He ran out of daylight and time, so tonight after work he called me to come check out this backyard. We scoped around,...Laur found some tantalizing fragments right on the surface and we dug a couple of test holes, but no obvious privy...While Tom and Lauren dug, I went to check out a run down and condemned house adjacent to the yard we were in...I found a copper oval handeled kettle (for firewood) some antique baskets, up in an overhead storage cubby off the porch, there was even a bushel basket of crowntop embossed beers....and a peanutbutter style crock.Then I decided to crawl under this house....I looked in the crawl hole and thought I could see a med/chemist style bottle under there....I went up top and pryed off some porch boards where Mayor Tom had went through the rotten wood....Finally I walked to my truck and grabbed a flashlight. OMG....THE bottle Tom and I had only heard about and I've seen the only other known example, just 7 years ago. Before then I didn't even know such a local druggist existed. Tom and I are working towards a mutual project with the historic society....A book that was originally entitled "Bottles and Breweries of Bradford", but the concept has been expanded to include Drugstores and maybe local Dairys....Anyhow, Tom had obtaind permission to photograph the one known example of this druggist....Now we don't need to!"
GREAT STUFF JOE,CONGRATS TO YOU ALL, AND IN TRUE BOTTLE DIGGERS CODE HE IS SHARING OWNERSHIP UNTIL THEY FIND ANOTHER...GOOD LUCK WITH THAT GUYS. I WILL FIND SOME HISTORY ON THIS DRUGGIST AND ADD IT HERE ASAP, IF ANYONE HAS ANY PLEASE SEND TO ME AND I WILL PUT IT HERE, THANKS

                         BOTTLE OF THE WEEK VERY RARE ROYAL CLUB SCHNAPPS

 THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK A VERY RARE IF NOT ONE OFF, "CELEBRATED ROYAL CLUB SCHNAPPS" AND COMES FROM THE JAMES CAMPIGLIA'S COLLECTION. NO INFORMATION HAS BEEN FOUND ON THIS I WAS TOLD...WELL I WILL SAY THIS, IT TOOK THE BETTER PART OF 4 HOURS OF SEARCHING DOCUMENTATION FROM 1820 UP AND I FINALLY DID PUT IT TOGETHER. THIS IS AN INCREDIBLE BOTTLE, THE CRUDENESS AND COLOR ALONG WITH THE EXTREME RARITY MAKE IT A JEWEL. I WOULD LIKE TO THANK JAMES FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE THIS GREAT FIND.HE DUG THIS...CAN YOU IMAGINE....ANYWAY, HERE IS THE HISTORY.AND THIS BOTTLE FOLLOWING LAST WEEKS GREAT UDOLPHO COLLECTION GO HAND IN HAND. A DEAL WAS STRUCK BETWEEN THE UDOLPHO SCHNAPPS COMPANY AND ROBERTS TO SELL  ROYAL SCHNAPPS, A SCHNAPPS MADE BY UDOLPHO  AND UDOLPHO AGREED TO PROVIDE HIM WITH PRODUCT TO START OUT (223 CASES)  AND THEN THE RECIPE TO MANUFACTURE THE QUALITY EQUAL TO THAT OF THE UDOLPHO COMPANY SCNAPPS.  THE CASES THAT WERE BOUGHT TO START OUT WERE SAID TO BE OF EQUAL PROOF AND QUALITY AS THE UDOLPHO WOLF BRAND. THEY WERE INFERIOR TO SAY THE LEAST AND THAT WAS THE END OF THE DEAL. THEY ENDED UP IN COURT AND ROBERTS GOT PAID BACK FOR 205 CASES AND NOT THE 223 CASES HE PAID FOR...SOMETHING AS STATED IN THE COURT PAPERS THE JUDGE DID NOT UNDERSTAND AS WHY THE REFEREE DID THIS.THAT ENDED ROYAL SCHNAPPS AND ROBERTS CLOSED HIS STORE IN NEW YORK AT NUMBER 5 WILLIAM STREET. THIS ALL TOOK PLACE IN LESS THAN 3 YEARS TIME, 1855-1858. NO MORE BOTTLES OF ROYAL WERE PRODUCED, SO.....OUT OF THE 223 CASES, 85 OF WHICH WERE OUT ON SALE BY OTHER DEALERS, HOW MANY SURVIVE?. THIS ONE...SO FAR. THANK YOU JAMES FOR ALLOWING ME THIS, GREAT BOTTLE AND NOW YOU HAVE THE HISTORY YOU SOUGHT TO GO WITH IT....FAIR TRADE OFF. 

 Roberts v. Carter.

The report of a referee should state the facts found, and the conclusions of law, separately.

Where the evidence, on a hearing before the referee, is conflicting, it presents a fair question for the decision of a referee; and it is a most salutary rule that the decision of a referee, upon a question of fact—especially of fraud— where there is evidence on both sides, and the point is not entirely free from doubt, cannot be disturbed.   Where it appears, when depositions are offered in evidence, that every reasonable effort has been made, to find the witnesses, to subject them to the process of subpoena; and there is every reason to suppose that they are out of the state, this is sufficient to authorize the reading of the depositions.    Where goods are sold by sample, and are represented to be of a specified quality, the rule of damages in an action for a breach of warranty, or for false representations, is the difference between the price obtained, on a resale, and that which would have been obtained had the goods been of the quality represented.   APPEAL from a judgment entered upon the report of a referee. The action was brought to recover of the defendant the loss and damages sustained by the plaintiff on account of certain false and fraudulent representations alleged to have   been made by the defendant, on a sale of liquors to the plaintiff; and upon a warranty on said sale; and for the defendant's neglect to furnish the plaintiff with a receipt or information, by means of which a certain kind of liquor or schnapps could be made, at a specified cost, equal in quality to Wolfe's schnapps, &c. The cause was referred to a referee, who reported, that he found that the defendant, on or about the 7th day of June, 1855, sold to the plaintiff 84 cases of an article known as royal Scheidam schnapps, alleged to be out on commission, and 139£ cases of the said royal Scheidam schnapps in store, at No. 5 William street, in the city of New York, all of which were sold by sample, and represented and agreed by the defendant to be of equal quality and proof with the sample, and equal in quality and proof to the article known as Wolfe's Scheidam aromatic schnapps, for which the plaintiff, relying upon the said representations and agreements of the defendant, paid the defendant the full value and price, as agreed, for schnapps of the quality and proof as represented by the defendant as aforesaid; and that, in truth and in fact, the said schnapps, both those out on commission and those on hand in the said store, were inferior in quality and proof to the said samples and the said Wolfe's aromatic Schiedam schnapps. That the defendant, for $'388.13, paid by the plaintiff to him, promised and agreed that, immediately after such payment, he would furnisli the plaintiff with a recipe or information, by means of which the plaintiff might manufacture a certain article known as royal Scheidam schnapps, equal in quality and proof to the article known as Wolfe's Schiedam aromatic schnapps; and that the said royal Schiedam schnapps made agreeably to the said recipe or information, were and would be equal in quality and proof to said Wolfe's schnapps. That the defendant has never given or furnished the plaintiff with such a recipe or information, but, instead thereof, named certain articles or materials and their relative proportions or quantities, aud the mode of using them, which the defendant represented and alleged would make and constitute the royal Schiedam schnapps of the quality and proof hefore stated, when, in truth, and in fact, the said materials named by the defendant do not produce, and cannot, in the proportions directed by the defendant, be made to produce the quality and proof of schnapps represented by the defendant. That the plaintiff has sustained damages, by means of the premises, to the amount of the difference between the price at which the schnapps, whether in store or out on commission or manufactured in accordance with the recipe or information given by the defendant, and actually sold by the plaintiff, would have sold for, in case they had proved equal in quality and proof to the samples aforesaid and to Wolfe's schnapps, as represented and agreed by the defendant, and the price at which they were, in fact and in good faith, sold by the plaintiff That the plaintiff actually sold 205 cases of schnapps, either in store or out on commission at the time of the said sale, or made in accordance with the recipe given by the defendant to the plaintiff, all of which were inferior in quality and proof to Wolfe's schnapps and to the said sample; and that the difference between the price at which the said 205 cases might and would have been sold for, in case the quality and proof had proved equal so the said sample and to Wolfe's aromatic Scheidam schnapps, and the price for which they were actually sold, was $4 per case, making in all the sum of $820, for which sum the plaintiff was entitled to judgment against the defendant.   Three witnesses, William H. King, jun. Charles Potter and Frederick Smith, were examined conditionally, on the part of the plaintiff, pursuant to a stipulation. Their depositions being offered in evidence, before the referee, the defendant objected that there was not sufficient proof of the absence of those witnesses from the state. The plaintiff then introduced proof tending to show that King was a resident of Ohio, and had left the city for that state the week previous; that Smith was a resident of California, and had sailed for home in the next steamer after his testimony was taken; that Potter, also, , Boberts v. Carter.  was out of the state, and had gone to California. Also that the plaintiffs had attempted to serve subpoenas upon those witnesses. The referee refused to admit the depositions in evidence. The defendant excepted to the report of the referee, on various grounds, and appealed from the judgment entered thereon.

M Terry, for the appellant. John Fitch, for the plaintiff.

By the Court, Da Vies, P. J. We think this case is not before us in proper form. The report of the referee should have stated the facts found, and the conclusions of law, separately. (Otis v. Spencer, 16 New York Rep. 610. Hunt v. Bloomer, 3 Kern. 341. Johnson v. Whitlock, Id. 344.)   Assuming that the referee had stated the facts correctly, we see what facts he has found, and with that finding we cannot interfere; unless it is clearly against the weight of evidence, or is in direct violation of some rule of law. (Davis v. Allen, 3 Comst. 168. Murfey v. Brace, 23 Barb. 561.) The latter case enunciates a sound rule, and one directly applicable to the present case. It is that when the evidence, as in this case, is conflicting, it presents a fair question for the decision of the referee; and it is well observed that it is a most salutary rule that the decision of the referee, upon a question of fact, especially of fraud, where there is evidence on both sides, and the point is not entirely free from doubt, cannot be disturbed.

The objection to the depositions of Potter and Smith, we think are not tenable; as the proof was quite satisfactory to show that when their depositions were admitted, there was every reason to suppose the witnesses were out of the state. Every reasonable effort had been made to find them, to subject them to the process of subpoena, and the proof was quite adequate to authorize the reading of their depositions.

The defendant sold to the plaintiff 84 cases of schnapps out  on commission, and 139 in store, which the referee has found as a fact were sold hy sample, and represented to be of a quality equal to Wolfe's schnapps. That the plaintiff sold 205 of these cases, or some others made in accordance with the recipe, how many does not clearly appear; and that the difference between the price obtained, and that which would have been obtained if the article had been of the quality represented, was $4 a case; and the referee allows to the plaintiff only on the 205 cases. We are unable to see why the referee did not allow for the 223 cases which were sold, and this would have increased the amount of the damages. We do not see that the defendant can complain of this. Assuming that the referee has found the facts correctly, we see no error in the rule of damages adopted by him. As he has allowed no damages to the plaintiff by reason of the recipe not proving what it was represented to be, it is unnecessary to consider what was the effect and character of the representations of the defendant (if any) in respect to it.

The judgment should be affirmed, with costs. [new York General Term, November 4, 1858. Daries, Clerke and Sutherland, Justices.]

 

                      BOTTLE OF THE WEEK UDOLPHO WOLFES AROMATIC SCHNAPPS

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE(S) OF THE WEEK  COMES FROM FELLOW COLLECTOR TOM DOLIGALE FROM LOUISVILLE KENTUCKY,AND AS YOU WILL SEE BELOW ...AN IMPRESSIVE COLLECTION IT IS.THANKS TOM, GREAT STUFF.

A. BRIEF HISTORY.

The undersigned has been an importer of Wines, Brandies, and other foreign liquors, for more than twenty-five years, in the city of New-York. In the course of that period, he has become interested in the manufactory of Gin, at Schiedam, in Holland. From this connection, he became acquainted with the improved processes of manufacture which had given to that peculiar variety of Holland Gin its transcendent reputation throughout the world. But the article itself, in its genuine quality as imported, was almost as rare, in this country at least, as it was everywhere renowned. Its high price had caused it to be almost universally adulterated, by cheap distillations and destructive drugs, the moment it was transferred from the importer's cellars to those of the retail dealer. And this was but a single phase of the multifarious impositions to which the public had become subjected, in relation to this esteemed commodity. In common with French Brandies and "Wines, of high repute and cost, it was actually imported impure—that is to say, grossly inferior liquors, drugged to resemble it, were imported under the same name. Not only was there a nefarious trade, conducted systematically, in the old casks and Custom House certificates of the genuine product, to make them the fraudulent vehicles and guaranties of the vilest home-made concoctions, but the import trade itself-had become so prostituted as to pander, quite generally, to a wholesale imposition.

THE FIRST CRISIS.

But no evil of similar enormity to this, undermining the health of the community at large, and multiplying its victims on every side, can long pursue its destructive career without developing a public crisis. The medical men of the country were naturally the first to perceive the depth and prevalence of the evil, and they united with every enlightened friend of humanity to deplore and denounce it. In their hands, however, it never became a theme of extravagant and fanatical excitement, over-leaping all rational and judicious boundaries, but of grave and practical consideration. Their education and experience alike assured them that, in many cases of prostration from illness, as well as of constitutional debility, there were no known nor conceivable remedies that could be successfully substituted for vinous and stimulating beverages; while, in some peculiar forms of disease, both acute and chronic, the renowned Gin of Schiedam had an established and specific efficacy which nothing could replace, and to which no other could pretend. It was not alleged by the medical profession that such beverages had contributed, in any degree whatever, to the vice of intoxication and its diseases, which the common liquors had caused to abound; but, on the contrary, that they could nowhere be reliably procured, even for medicinal purposes, nor for judicious and salutary use, however urgently required. Upon a numerous class of minds, less competently educated and well balanced, the prevalent evil produced a crisis of social and political fanaticism, and demonstrations of legislative tyranny, wholly unprecedented in the history of modern civilization. It was not because the American people were either more averse or more addicted to stimulating liquors, than other nations of mankind, that such formidable multitudes rushed to those extravagant extremes of coercive abstinence and despotic philanthropy which have latterly made the popular legislation of this country, upon this subject, so great a paradox to the world; but it was simply because this country, above all others, labored under the intolerable evil of base and pernicious liquors, everywhere used as popular beverages. It is to this source, and to this alone, that we must look, and that the future historian will refer, for the true cause of these social phenomena, so anomalous in the character of a republican and liberal people.

THE REMEDY INTRODUCED.

Accordingly, in the year 1848, he commenced an unusually extensive importation of the purest and most improved Holland Gin that the chemical science and skillful experience of the celebrated establishment at Schiedam had ever produced; and he made arrangements for supplying it to the public by a method, better calculated than any heretofore adopted, to prevent its adulteration and imitation by the retail dealer.

1st. The article itself was so eminently superior in taste, smell, appreciable purity, and cordial effects, as to ensure its distinct recognition, above every other, by any person of ordinary discernment or experience. This striking superiority was effected by special business engagements for the choicest possible selection of the materials from which it was to be made, and by the introduction of improved processes of manufacture, unknown to any other establishment in the world. The soundest and brightest barley that could be procured from the best districts of Europe, was alone accepted for this purpose. An elaborate series of repeated rectifications and anhydrous tests, never before adopted upon an extensive scale, insured it a matchless and perfect purity, hitherto unattainable in any distillation; while the happy selection of a peculiarly delicate and delicious variety of the Italian juniper berry, previously used only in medical prescriptions and some few rare cordials, gave it at once a flavor, an aroma, and a medicinal value, with which no other can compare.

2d. In its denomination as "wolfe's Aromatic Schiedam Schnapps," it received a distinctive name and trade-mark, the counterfeiting or fraudulent imitation of which is a penal offence.

3d. By advertisements and circulars published throughout the Union, and specially addressed to the medical and chemical faculty of the country, it was confidently submitted to the severest tests that medical judgment and chemical analysis could apply. Indeed, such tests were earnestly solicited, in order that the qualities claimed for it might be established by the highest possible authorities, or at once disproved by evidence of which its proprietor was ignorant. And it should be remembered that this bold challenge was offered at a period of public excitement, on the subject of alcoholic beverages, in which fair treatment, from the great multitude of violent opponents, was scarcely to be expected.

4th. It was not sold by the cask or gallon, like other imported liquors, but in order to insure it pure to the retail purchaser, and for medical and domestic use, it was put up in pint or quart bottles, having its title embossed in the glass, and covered with labels and envelopes descriptive of its character and properties, and bearing a facsimile of the proprietor's signature.

ITS RECEPTION AND CELEBRITY.

Its reception, by the public at large, will ever be regarded as memorable in mercantile history. As the medical profession, however, was the first to deplore and denounce the pernicious liquors which, up to this period, were alone to be obtained, and the effects of which had produced social and political convulsions of the most alarming aspect, so, be it recorded to the honor of the enlightened and independent character of that profession, it was the first to recognize and appreciate a substitute which they justly regarded as being the most effectual remedy for the popular evils those vile liquors had produced, that the Genius of Temperance herself could have devised. More than three thousand letters of congratulation, of encouragement, of approval, of unreserved endorsement, and of generous encomium, were received by the undersigned, from members of that profession alone, within the first year or two of that adventurous enterprise. Free permission was given to publish these testimonials by physicians, too illustrious in reputation to heed the frowns of a mortified and mistaken fanaticism, and too intent upon the great duty of promoting the public welfare, to shrink from the annoyances that duty might involve. Pharmaceutical chemists, of profound acquirements, voluntarily undertook the task of testing the asserted purity and properties of the newly-renowned beverage, and hesitated not to announce the complete verification of them which elaborate analysis had established.

The popular results were probably not greater than the intelligence of the popular mind, in this country, would have warranted a thoughtful calculation to predict, but they were certainly far greater than the proprietor himself had presumed to expect. The Schiedam Aromatic Schnapps was sought for by individuals, by associations, by public institutions, and by mercantile agencies, alike from the remotest sections of the country, and from the most populous and commercial. No better proof could have been offered of the villainous character of the alcoholic compounds previously in use, and of the high qualities of the pure and delightful beverage that could now be obtained instead. Its sale has continued to extend, in a rapidly accelerating ratio, to the present hour; and, aided by the new circumstances under which it is now to be offered to the public, it cannot fail to become the refined national beverage, to the exclusion of all the low liquors hitherto so generally consumed, and so deleterious and demoralizing in their effects.

THE SECOND CRISIS.-THE EXPOSITION.

The sudden and signal triumph of this pure production, over the whole host of diabolical distillations and compounds with which it came in conflict, created the utmost consternation among the great fraternity of liquor-mixers and adulterators who had so long pursued their unscrupulous trade with impunity, and no expedient was deemed too desperate or too vile to be employed as a weapon of resistance. The hostile feelings thus naturally aroused, were aggravated to the highest degree by a pamphlet published by the undersigned, in 1851, entitled "An Exposition of Prevalent Impositions and Adulterations, Practised 'by unprincipled dealers in "Wines and Liquors; respectfully addressed to the Physicians, Apothecaries, Druggists, and Hotel-Keepers of the United States," and of which 50,000 copies were demanded in a few months. In this "Exposition," the sword of fearless reform was fairly drawn, and the scabbard thrown away. Nothing that the Temperance Societies had published, for the previous twenty years, was so calculated to open the eyes of the community to the dangers, and, indeed, the inevitable consequences of an indiscriminate use of even the "best liquors," falsely so called, that could be procured. But those societies, instead of being gratified with these startling disclosures, as fairly auxiliary to their cause, regarded them'with sulky suspicion and dissatisfaction, because the inferences which the writer had drawn from them, and the practical conclusions which he had suggested, did not come up to the exclusive and proscriptive standard to which they were committed. They accordingly united with the liquor-mixers in decrying the pure and useful commodity which he had introduced to supplant the bad. Disagreeing in everything else, these new allies found it quite convenient to agree in declaring that the renowned "Schiedam Aromatic Schnapps" was "nothing but common gin, which could be bought any where, as it always had been bought," forgetting all the while that, if this were really the case, they need not give themselves any further trouble upon the subject, as the public would find it out as well and as soon as they. But it happened that the public were not slow in discovering exactly the reverse of this coalition allegation; were rapidly discovering that it was a very uncommon kind of gin—so very uncommon, indeed, that they never had the good fortune to meet with any thing like it, or to be compared with it, before. Then speedily came along the chemical and medical explanation of the mystery. The public never had met with any thing like it before, simply because none like it, or equal to it, had ever before been made! Chemical analysis, voluntarily undertaken and published for the public good, "to expose deceptive pretensions, if deceptive they were, and to corroborate an inestimable improvement, if it had really been made," settled the question of its superiority, by elucidating, in detail, its striking distinctive differences, as already above described. "I resolved," says one eminent chemist, "to inform medical men, at least, for the sake of the public at large, of the results of my investigation, whether they proved favorable or otherwise to the character of the article or the interests of its proprietor;" and it is well known that, after describing every successive step of the analysis, and stating each particular result, he added, "Accordingly, I feel bound to say that I regard this gin as being in every respect preeminently pure, and deserving of medical patronage."

THE NEW COALITION NON-PLUSSED AND DISSOLVED.

The numerous testimonials, to the same effect, which successively appeared, from the very highest professional authorities, having rendered the distinction between the Schiedam Aromatic Schnapps and "common gin," too broad to be effectually disputed, the late alliance of the liquor-mixers and total-abstinents was considerably non-plussed, and the new system of tactics, which it became necessary to pursue, rendered the coalition inconvenient. The liquor-mixers found it expedient to take a very short turn in their policy; they resolved to unite with the medical and chemical faculty in extolling the very article they had previously denounced as "common and unclean," because they had resolved to counterfeit it, imitate it, and get up other articles of similar pretensions. The Temperance Societies, (erroneously so designated,) alarmed and confounded, from day to day, at able articles, in their own public organs, making a just and rational distinction between the pure and the impure liquors thus openly in competition, and hesitating not to indicate a marked exception in favor of the Schiedam Aromatic Schnapps, were driven back from the coalition ground of "common gin," to their old, but equally preposterous position of "common poison."

THE RESPECTIVE POSITIONS OF THE HOSTILE  FORCES

These societies it will be remembered, bad long and wildly denounced every beverage but that of the brute creation as essentially poisonous in all quantities, and under all possible circumstances. It was nothing to them that medical testimony, and the experience of mankind, in all ages and nations, refuted the absurd assumption. It sufficed for them to be fortified with the argument of the celebrated temperance lecturer—that such was their theory, and if it disagreed with the facts, why so much the worse for the facts. Upon this impudent dogma, and upon this alone, did they hoist their boasted banner of reform. It is, therefore, unnecessary to say that their labors and objects have proved to be as impracticable as the position they assumed was untenable and absurd.

The undersigned having resolved to be useful in practice rather than novel in theory, no longer regarded the temperance branch of his opponents as formidable enemies. On the, contrary, so far as they concurred with him in deprecating the use of the pernicious liquids popularly consumed, he was willing to regard them as auxiliaries and friends. Since he merely advocated the substitution of good liquors for bad, and the moderate use even of the former, as an invariable rule, it was of little moment to him that they denounced even the most moderate and temperate use of pure and invigorating beverages as "a system of suicide," so long as the victims, juries, and coroners, were assembled only in the chambers of the imagination. Believing that mankind would persist in imbibing agreeable and cheering beverages to the end of time, as they had done from the beginning, he cherished no other theory of reform than was suggested and sustained by the statistics and living evidence of the various nations of the world. That eyidence is, and ever has been, that where the popular beverages are good, abundant, and cheap, intoxication and its demon train of physical and moral evil are comparatively unknown— are the exception rather than the prevailing rule. Viewing these conditions and results in the light of cause and effect, he is convinced that where the popular drinks are badly made, corrupted, or naturally impure in quality, and where they are subjected to exasperating restrictions and high duties, then will intoxication become too obviously a popular degradation, and its consequences a frightful bane to the common weal. His position, therefore, in this controversy, is tangible and clear.

That of his implacable opponents, the liquor-mixers, counterfeiters, and adulterators, alone remains to be further described. Having been compelled, as already stated, by the overwhelming testimonials of men of science, and the concurrent opinion of the most respectable classes of the community, to abandon their former course of detraction as ineffectual and unprofitable, they resorted to the policy of availing themselves of the reputation which they could not destroy, by making it a source of gain to themselves. To counterfeit Wolfe's Schiedam Aromatic Schnapps became the prime object of their nefarious ingenuity, their extensive combinations, and their associated capital. These combinations, within the last three years, have extended to every principal city in the Union. In New-York, Philadelphia, Boston, Baltimore, Cincinnati, St. Louis, and New-Orleans, these partnerships in imposition and fraud are known to exist, for the undersigned has the various specimens of their counterfeit productions actually in his possession, and it is but too probable that the sub-agencies of these several branches of the general fraud have extended throughout the country. It is, therefore, important that the public should know the

CHARACTER AND COMPOSITION OF THE COUNTERFEITS.

 In the external appearance of the bottles, they are generally as close and deceptive imitations as could be devised, even to the forgery of the proprietor's signature. In some particular instances, where the parties feared the consequences of detection in literal forgery, a general resemblance, sufficient to impose upon careless purchasers, is all that has been attempted. But an imitation, more or less close, of the title of the pure article, of the true description of its superior quality and properties, of the style and color of the printed envelope, and even of the proprietor's cautions against pernicious counterfeits, has been almost invariably adopted.

On submitting various samples of these spurious "Schnapps" to chemical analysis, some of them were found to be composed of what is technically denominated in the trade of liquor-mixing "pure spirits "—that is, American whisky, with the essential oil removed, flavored with the common oil of juniper, reduced 30 per cent, below proof, and freely enlivened with sulphuric acid, (oil of vitriol,) to "give it a bead" when shaken. This "bead" test of the quality of spirituous liquors is quite a popular criterion with those who are ignorant of the fact that it can be produced in the most worthless and abominable liquors ever made, by the skillful use of oil of vitriol in mixing them; and, provided the stomach and intestines were capable of resisting its poisonous action and cumulative consequences, it would be a decided improvement upon such liquors, both in appearance and flavor. Indeed, it is well known to every chemist, familiar with alcoholemetry, to be the most effectual ingredient that can be employed in successful imitations of superior liquors. Accordingly, it has been almost invariably detected by an analysis of the counterfeits of the Schiedam Aromatic Schnapps; and the only protection the public have against it is to purchase the genuine article only of authorized agents.

There has been, however, another class of cordial beverages lately introduced in the principal cities, in more open rivalry with the one pure commodity, and it is of these especially that the public should be on their guard. These are advertised under the various names of "London Cordial Gin," "Old Schiedam Gin," "London Club-House Gin," "Medicated Schnapps," &c, &c.—most of which are proved, by unquestionable evidence, to be concocted here chiefly by liquor-mixers, and contain not even an admixture of the imported liquors they pretend to be. They are chiefly compounded of the so-called "pure spirits," before described, peculiarly sweetened, and flavored with anniseed, coriander, or juniper, according to the peculiarities of the genuine article they are designed to counterfeit. Yet it is claimed, for each of these miserable impositions, that it possesses medicinal properties of known and approved efficacy; and it would be amusing, if it were not morally revolting, to see that these claims are asserted in the very language, almost word for word, that has been applied, by the highest medical authorities, exclusively to the Schiedam Aromatic Schnapps, manufactured and imported by the undersigned. But it scarcely need be said, that men who are base enough to counterfeit a valuable improvement of this kind, can have no restraint from conscience or moral principle, on the score of the consequences, either to the sick or well, that must result from the success of their mercenary frauds.

THE HIGH DUTIES THAT HAVE FOSTERED THE FRAUDS.

It must be evident, to every man of business, that these infamous impositions have been greatly fostered by the high ad valorem duty of 100 per cent, that has hitherto been most unwisely imposed upon the genuine imported article. This enormous duty, in fact, has operated as an inciting premium and reward to impositions of this class. To this consideration may be added the high cost of the genuine article, as manufactured, not only from the greater prices of the select materials of which it is made, but also from circumstances in the affairs of Europe which have tended to enhance it for some years past. The repeated failures of the wine crop in France, caused a correspondingly increased demand for liquors brewed or distilled from grain, and a proportionate enhancement of their price. The grain crop itself, in some of its most important districts, was sensibly reduced by the withdrawal of laborers to the Crimean war, and by other fortuitous causes. It was, consequently, extremely difficult for the undersigned so to reduce the price of the Schiedam Abomatio Schnapps that it might compete, in this particular, with the host of spurious articles which, costing comparatively nothing, were furnished to retailers at greater profit. Indeed, the high duty of 100 per cent, alone sufficed to render so great a reduction impracticable, and it was only by the continual reiteration of "Cautions to the Public," advertised at great expense, that the unsuspecting could be protected from imposition.

GREAT REDUCTION OF DUTIES AND PRICES.

It was, doubtless, the many influential representations' of these and similar facts to the Congress of the United States, that led to the great and salutary reduction of duty on imported liquors, which was achieved by that body, at its session closing in March, 1857; and which took effect on the first of July ensuing. That reduction being to the extent of 70 per cent, cannot fail to be attended by results of inestimable value to the health and morals of the community, since it must reduce the consumption of our poisonous and intoxicating domestic distillations and adulterations, in a proportionate degree.

A CAUSE OF SPECIAL CONGRATULATION AND ENCOURAGEMENT.

To the enlightened friends, however, of the great object which the undersigned had in view, when, under the most discouraging combination of circumstances, he undertook the introduction of the Schiedam Aeomatio Schnapps, not merely for medical and domestic use, but also for popular preference, as a substitute for the abominably pernicious and demoralizing drinks which everywhere prevailed—to those discriminating, manly, and intrepid friends, who sustained this hazardous effort in the darkest hour of trial, it is a matter of special congratulation that its full and boundless triumph is now a moral certainty. Who will now imbibe the vulgar and unpalatablepoisons heretofore consumed, even at the most respectable places of popular resort, when the purest and most renovating beverage ever manufactured, in any country, can be procured at a less price than was ever before known for any of the least pretension to good quality? May it not now be anticipated, from an inevitable law of trade, that inferior articles, of nearly equal price, will be superseded by the superior, and driven from the popular market? And will it not be admitted by every intelligent and humane man in the community, that, in this great result, the public at large will realize one of the most beneficial and humane reforms that the highest impulses of philanthropy could have proposed to achieve?

•The Schnapps is put up in cases of one doz. quarts, and two doz. pints; the price, by the single case, is five dollars per doz. for quarts, and two dollars and fifty cents per doz. for the pints, and a large deduction, from that price, to the wholesale purchaser.

UDOLPHO WOLFE,  Sole Manufacturer and Importer, 18, 20, & 22 Beaver Street.   New-York, July 1, 1857.

 

 

 THE NEW YORK TIMES~JULY 9TH, 1871


UDOLPH'O WOLFES AROMATIC SCHEIDAM SCHNAPPS SEEMS TO BE EXTENSIVELY GAINING OUR PUBLIC CONFIDENCE AND PROMISES TO TAKE THE PLACE OF EVERY OTHER LIQUOR NOW IN USE BY PHYSICIANS FOR MEDICINAL USES.THIS IS NOT SUPRISING FOR APART FROM IT BEING FOUND IN THE RESPECTABLE DRUGSTORES IN IN THIS CITY AND OUR COUNTRY, THE MILD AND AGREEABLE TASTE OF THIS ARTICLE CONTRASTED WITH THE STRONG, PUNGENT AND ACTIAL SENSATION PRODUCED ON THE PALATE BY THE COMMON DELETERIOUS ARTICLE WHICH IS NOW THE GENERAL COMPLAINT OF NEARLY ALL THE THE MEDICAL FACULTYOF THIS COUNTRY.WOULD OF ITSELF SUFFICE TO GIVE IT THE DECIDED  PREFERENCE.IF PRESCRIBED AS A MEDICINE IT IS NOT BAD TO TAKE AND TO USEAS A BEVERAGE IT IS CONSIDERED BY JUDGES TO BE SUPERIOR TO ANY ARTICLE IMPORTED IN THIS COUNTRY.


As a general beverage and necessary corrective of water rendered impure by vegetable decomposition or otlier causes, as Limestone, Sulphate of Copper, etc., the Aromatic Schnapps is superior to every other alcoholic preparation. A public trial of over thirty years' duration in every section of our country of UDOLFHO WOLFE'S SCHXAFFS, its unsolicited indorsement by tJie medical faculty, and a sale unequalled by any other alcoholic distillation, have recured for it the reputation 'or salubrity claimed for it.

FOE SALE BY ALL DEUGGISTS AND GROCERS.    UDOLPHO WOLFE'S  SCHIEDAM AROMATIC  SCHNAPPS,

9 Beaver Street, New York.

                    BOTTLE OF THE WEEK RARE WARNERS SAFE COMPOUND LONDON

 THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  COMES FROM MY FELLOW COLLECTOR FRIEND IN THE UK  FRANCIS ROMANOWSKI, HE AND HIS DIGGING PARTNER NOT ONLY DUG ONE OF THESE RARE BOTTLES..BUT THREE!!. WARNERS SAFE COMPOUND, THESE ARE VERY SOUGHT AFTER AND THE ONLY VARIANT HARDER TO COME BY IS THE STRAP SIDED ONE. WHAT A DAY...GREAT STUFF FRANCIS THANKS FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE IT.HERE IS A LINK TO THE FACEBOOK BLOG DEDICATED TO WARNERS FANS/COLLECTORS WARNERS BLOG

 

 Perhaps one of Warner’s most prestigious foreign branches was his London office opened in 1882. Not only was the office in a major world capital, but it produced some, if not most of the most colorful Warner’s available to collectors. (See Warner Colors). This includes 40 oz. Animal Cures in various shades of amber and green, the Safe Cure in pint and half-pint in amber, shades or green and aqua, the Diabetes Cure in pints in shades of amber to green, the Nervine in pint and half-pint in shades of amber and green, the Rheumatic Cure in pints in shades of amber and green, two sizes of Compound and sample miniatures in amber and green. In addition to supplying the Safe Cure needs of the Brits, the London office apparently also supplied Safe Cure across the English Channel to France and possibly to Belgium and Switzerland as well.  Over the course of its existence until the 1930′s, the London office shifted its locations around the City. According to research based upon Warner advertising and London City Directories, H. H. Warner & Co. Ltd. operated out of the following locations:  1885   81 Southhampton Row, WC  1889, 1899, 1902   86 Clarkenwell Road, EC  1909, 1914, 1920 and 1923   18 & 20 Laystall Street, Rosebury Avenue, EC   1927   18 Laystall Street, EC1  1931-1932   18 &20 Laystall Street, EC1 (Space shared with M. F. Frederick, Mechanical Engineer)   1934    18 & 20 Laystall Street, EC1   1939    63a Hall Road, Peckham SE15

      BOTTLE OF THE WEEK STONEWARE WALKDENS INK ~ COOPER AND COMPANY LTD.

 BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM FELLOW COLLECTOR IN THE U.K. MARK SIMMONDS AND IS A STONEWARE WALKDENS INK WITH LABELS, HE HAS AN IMPRESSIVE COLLECTION OF INKS AND HAVING A SMALL COLLECTION OF INKS MYSELF I DECIDED TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THIS INK COMPANY AND RUN ONE OF MARKS BOTTLES...OR TWO. THESE ARE STONEWARE AND BOTH SPORT ORIGINAL LABELS,GREAT STUFF, THANKS MARK. I COULDNT HELP BUT ADD A COUPLE PICTURES OF THE IMPRESSIVE SHELVES OF INKWELLS HE HAS AS WELL....ENJOY.

 

  Cooper, Dennison & Walkden, Ltd.

Ink Manufacturers, Makers of Dennison's patent tags, melanyl, &c.

'Established in 1735' looks very well on the top of a bill head, and Messrs. Cooper, Dennison & Walkden are among the few business firms who have a history extending over a period of a hundred and sixty years. The founder of the business was Mr. Richard Walkden, who occupied premises on Old London Bridge, whero he manufactured ink of exceptional quality. We have seen Mr. Walkden's original account books written one hundred and fifty years ago which are to-day perfectly legible, the ink being unfaded.  It is obviously a matter of importance that documents of importance and books of accompt should be written with indelible ink such as our forefathers used. Such an ink is Walkden's Register Ink. Fashion, however, changes, Blue-black ink is the rage, and Messrs. Cooper, Dennison, & Walkden accordingly make more blue-black ink than they do of the Register Ink, which is identical in every respect with the ink made by the original Richard Walkden on Old London Bridge. Blue-black ink has a material advantage over the old-fashioned ink if used for correspondence, inasmuch as a copy can be obtained in the letter-book if taken shortly after writing, while at the same time if no copy is taken it does not 'set off' as many of the copying inks do.  Mr. Walkden moved into Southwark when the bridge was pulled down, and subsequently, as his business increased, again moved to premises in Shoe Lane about one hundred years ago. In 1820 a Mr. Terry joined the business and added quill pen making, also the parchment trade, now an important branch. A Mr. Darby also became a partner. As far back as 18B0 the firm of Walkden, Darby k Terry held the Government contracts, and it was then that they adopted a special label that is still used for the Register Ink, which, as we stated above, is made from Kichard Walkden's receipt, and is essentially an oldfashioned gall ink. Mr. D. Cooper joined the firm in 1840, and in 1873 was succeeded by his son, Mr. Philip Cooper, who was subsequently joined by Mr. T. B. Allison and Mr. A. K. Parkhouse. These three gentlemen are still connected with the firm —which in 1891 was converted into a private limited company—Mr. Cooper being appointed managing director.

To utilise the waste parchment, luggage labels were manufactured, and this formed a considerable portion of the trade done by the old firm, but in 1870 Mr. Cooper, who for some time had been doing business with the Dennison Manufacturing Co., of Boston, U.S., secured the sole agency for Great Britain for their goods, which comprised luggage labels styled 'Dennison's Tags,' pricing tickets of all kinds, gummed labels, jewellers' cardboard boxes, wood postal boxes, &c. Dennison's goods soon became popular, so much so that it was utterly impossible to cope with the orders. In 1889, therefore, arrangements were made with the Dennison Manufacturing Co., and a number of machines were transferred to London to premises specially erected in Verney Road, South Bermondsey. Here the work is under the direction of Mr. Allison. The premises are very extensive, covering upwards of an acre of ground, with provision for extension. There is a well-appointed laboratory attached to the ink works, and a qualified chemist is employed. The manufacture of 'Melanyl' marking ink, which is a speciality with the firm, is entirely carried on in the laboratory. In addition to inks of every description, sealing wax is also made at the 'Walkden' works, and a variety of other articles, particulars of which are given in the illustrated price list issued by the firm, whose London warehouse and offices are at 7 and 9 St. Bride Street, Ludgate Circus, to which they moved in 1892, when the lease of the premises in Shoe Lane expired.

 

                   

              BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  KORRYLUTZ LITHIA WATER ~ NEW YORK

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  CLOSE TO MINT LITHIA WATER FROM KORRY~LUTZ COMPANY.  I DID HOURS OF RESEARCH ON THIS ONE AND CALLED ON SOME FRIENDS THAT COLLECT THIS TYPE BOTTLE. HERE IS WHAT I HAVE COME UP WITH, THE COMPANY WAS LOCATED AT 177 BROADWAY IN NEW YORK CITY FROM 1902 UNTIL 1905 AND THEN THE COMPANY WAS CLOSED.177 BROADWAY IS A RENTAL PROPERTY ONLY AND HAS HAD MANY BUSINESSES LOCATED THERE OVER THE PERIOD FROM 1871-1922 WHILE IT WAS OWNED BY THE SAME MAN, WHO WAS ALSO ONE OF NEW YORKS RICHEST LAND OWNERS OF THE TIME. THE PARENT COMPANY OF THIS COMPANY WAS ACTUALLY CORRY SPRINGS LOCATED IN CORRY PENNSYLVANIA IN ERIE COUNTY,ALL SPELLINGS ARE CORRECT. THE LUTZ COMES INTO IT AS THE THE OWNER OF THE NEW YORK BRANCH AND THE SPELLING CHANGE WAS DUE TO THE NEW YORK BEING IT'S OWN SEPERATE COMPANY AND STRICTLY A BUYER OF THE CORRY WELL WATERS. THERE IS A LISTING OF THIS BOTTLE IN THE 1996 KOVELS BOOK BUT OTHER THAN THAT I HAVE YET TO HEAR FROM ANYONE OF ANY OTHER ONES COMING TO MARKET. I CHECKED WITH MY FRIENDS FROM MANHATTEN WHO DIG AND HAVE DUG NYC PRIVIES FOR MANY YEARS AND HAVE UNEARTHED SOME RARE BOTTLES AND THEY HAVE NOT COME ACCROSS THIS ONE. I THEREFORE FEEL VERY CONFORTABLE CALLING IT VERY RARE. I AM VERY INTERESTED IN ANY INFORMATION THAT ANYONE MAY HAVE ON IT, PLEASE SEND IT TO ME AT RICKSBOTTLEROOM@GMAIL.COM. THANKS MARK...GREAT STUFF BROTHER.

 

DETROIT, OCT. 10, 1887.

A CONTRIBUTION TO THE STUDY OF THE THERAPY OF LITHIA WATER.

BT WILLABD H. MORSE, M. D., WESTPIKLD, S. 3.

Lithia, though having all of the ordinary, remedial properties of other alkalies, is, however, possessed of certain peculiar advantages, which render it the best exponent of alkaline therapeutics. In point of general appreciation, potash, soda or lime may have the possession of prestige, but it is becoming more and more apparent that lithia will accomplish all that the other salts have gained honor for. It has been just seventy years since Arfveldson discovered the mineral which was named by his master, Berzelius; and it has been fully thirty years since it claimed a place as an antacid, diuretic, and antilithic. The solution of the integrity of the alkalies in discussion for half a century, and the confessed lapses of soda and potash, have furnished sufficient reasons for the blotted pages of the history of the salts.    If we seek the immediate cause for the tardy recognition of the value of the drug, not only by the profession at large, but by the pharinacopcaais, we may find it in the rival claims of the carbonate and citrate, and at points where a spirit of rivalry is rarely, if ever, presented. In spite of Garrod, Ure and Squire, with their uniform success with the carbonate, there arose a decided preference for the citrate, especially in England. The idea grew apace, only to fail when it was proven that the citrate is decomposed before entering the circulation, occurring in the blood and finally in the urine, in the form of the carbonate. This deduction resulted in the discovery of further fault, until something like a compromise was effected in the way of a manifestation of preference for natural lithia water. In fine, it seems to be a fact that the form in which the alkali is now most commonly prescribed is that of the natural water. At least this is the case in New York and Philadelphia, where the market for the carbonate and citrate is dull at best.

Lithia water may be described as in general favor, or if favor is at all lacking, it is because of the use of some of the inferior qualities of the water, which are unfortunately urged upon the attention of the profession. Probably the best results may be witnessed from the use of  the Londonderry lithia water, which contains a larger quantity of lithia, and is found in combination with more valuable minerals than any other water. It may be a use of therapeutical license, but it is the general opinion that the water is the ideal form for the employment of the salt, and that its occurrence in the water presents it at the fore of the alkalies. There can be no error in saying that the therapy of the Londonderry lithia water is the therapy of lithia, and that the therapy of lithia represents the best applications of the alkalies. Without quoting authorities in detail, the uses of the water may be briefly summarized from recent literature and from the note-books of leading physicians.  It is a mistake to suppose that the salts occurring in the water exhibit any toxic properties, corresponding in this essential with the waters exhibiting other bases, and from the absence of a property ignorantly attributed to it as fulfilling a most obvious indication.  Imprimis, there is the long-deserved reputation for the cure of gout and rheumatism. That it is adapted to the involved diathesis is gospel of the age of thirty years. Times have changed since Garrod in 1857, put forth the well-known dogma that "lithium is the only known solvent of the urates and crystals, which are the prime factors in gout, rheumatism, gravel, and many renal diseases." But with all of our modern ideas concerning microbes and bacilli, it is still a received item of fact that the several affections named, are equally amenable to the treatment. Internal use of the water in rheumatism and gout should hare conjoined with it a serial arrangement of baths douches, etc., which are justly esteemed promotive of action, though possibly not from inherent worth, but on general hydrotherapie principles.  When the joints are enlarged the systemic action of the •water may be increased by enveloping the affected parts in cloths wrung out of the water, as hot as can be borne. I am well aware that this has an empirical sound, but the evidence of leading practitioners is in its favor. This is especially noted in the case of the smaller joints remaining swollen and tender after the subsidence of the acute symptoms. Of these acute symptoms it may be observed that tincture of colchicum as well as salicylate of soda have but little effect upon them, while lithia water causes their rapid disappearance. It may be further stated as a matter of fact, that though the alkaline treatment of rheumatism has obtained condemnation because of the dyscrasic state induced by the enormous quantities of alkali necessary for cure, there cannot attach such condemnation to the treatment by lithia, for even were large quantities made necessary, there can never be any unpromising sequelae. If I may venture a personal expression it would be that I recognize no preferable method of treating rheumatism.  Though it is no longer fashionable to photograph the "uric acid diathesis" with horns, tail, and sulphurous odor, yet there is no question as to the utility of the lithia water in renal affections. The carbonate has lost favor as too irritating to the stomach, and the water, which is perhaps more effective, has no such objection. In the solution of renal calculi, it is notable that the lithia water will effect in a short time that which the potash salts will not effect unless long continued. It accomplishes much that a successful surgical operation can do, the only lack of success being when the urine is alkaline in reaction. Where the urinary organs are irritated, whether from calculi, enlarged prostate, gonorrhoea, cystitis, stricture, or acidity of urine, great relief is experienced. If it fail in treating either calculous or cystic troubles, it is only when the urine is ammoniacal and loaded with phosphates. In such case I would employ the benzoate of ammonia, in some cases with, and in others without, the lithia water.   In nephritis the water may be drunk ad libitum, with assurance of cure in the early stages, and of palliation when the disease is advanced. The efficacy is marked whether the disorder occurs in a gouty or rheumatic sub ject, or in one where such indication is wanting. The results are generally satisfactory, and are more marked than when brought about by the extemporized solution of the lithia salts. It is a good idea to use iron in Connection with the treatment, if an anasmic condition is to be corrected. If there is an indication for action on the glomerule of the kidney, it is well to combine digitalis, prescribing a tablespoonful of the infusion three times a day while continuing with the lithia water* Admirable results attend the use of the»water externally, applying it by sponglo-piline to the abdomen, while at the same time the patient is freely drinking the water. It is not to be denied that there is no more potent remedy for Bright's disease and the resulting dropsy. The same cannot be said, however, of general dropsy.  It seems to be no longer disputed that the hepatic action of lithia water is pronounced, especially in the treatment of incipient cirrhosis, congestion of the portal vein, and jaundice. While it is not other than useless in hepatic  colic, lithia water has the property of prevetion of the attacks. From the same fact the same agent is useful in the so-called bilioiLsick-headache, and in relieving duodena catarrh. It was formerly held that the close relationship between rheumatism and diabetes should lead to the use of litha in the latter disease. There is, however, no relief from thr lithia except when the diabetes is hepatic in itorigin. In that case the natural water be proved more useful than the most elaborate and diligent treatment with the salts. A sun able diet and regime is to be enjoined, and if 1 were addressing a patient of my own it would be with advice to seek residence at or near that springs.   As a remedy for an abnormal and excessive deposition of fat, lithia water is uniformly serviceable, but should be discontinued where there is a threat of anaemia. I prefer it in obesity to the bromides, which, though increasing waste, do so at the expense of a sever* gastro-intestinal catarrh, and to a "course" o! alkalies, which, necessarily requiring a prvtracted employment, are not as efficacious, In the indigestion of obese subjects, and indeed in atonic dyspepsia, I And the acidity and flatulence much relieved. It goes without saving that there can be no treatment of dyspepsia preferable to the use of lithia water in combiu ation with papoid, or vegetable pepsin.   In conclusion, I agree with the leading Am erican therapeutist that "the psychical in fluences of change of scene and association? are largely concerned in the results of treat ment with the water of mineral springs." Eicellent though the water is as found in the market, seven-fold better are the draught.taken from the springs as it bubbles forth glad with granitic flavors.

 

                    BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  J. BORN MINERAL WATER ~ CINCINNATI OHIO

 BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  COMES FROM WENDELL "DIGGER" HATFIELD FROM OHIO, A PRETTY HARD TO GET J. BORN MINERAL WATER, CINCINNATI OHIO AND IS HIS FAVORITE...I CAN SEE WHY, THANKS WENDELL. GREAT BOTTLE

"Rick it was found by a friend under an old old house here in southern Ohio and i got it in trade, i wish i would have dug it up it would have been awesome, the reason this is my favorite bottle is that this is my first squat blob bottle, i have always wanted one but i find just pieces when i walk along the Ohio river, and now i have a whole one! it says J.Born mineral water Cincinnati and on the back it has a large B and says this bottle never sold and it is iron pontiled on base...".

BELOW IS SOME LEGAL STUFF THAT J. BORN WAS ONE OF THE PEOPLE THAT WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN GETTING PASSED

[Passed and took effect April 9, 1880: 77 v. 140.]

Sec. 1. Be it enacted, etc., That all persons engaged in the manufacture, bottling, or selling of ginger-ale, seltzer-water, soda-water, mineral-water, or other beverages, in bottles or boxes, with the name or names or initials of the owner or owners thereof blown, stamped, or marked thereon, may file in the office of the secretary of state, and also in the office of the county clerk of the county in which such articles are manufactured, bottled, or sold, the name or names or initials so used by them, and cause the same to be printed for six successive weeks in a weekly newspaper, printed in the English language, in counties where no daily newspaper is printed or published; and in counties where a daily newspaper is printed and published, the same shall also be published in a daily newspaper of general circulation, printed in the English language, six times a week for six consecutive weeks, in counties where such articles are manufactured, bottled, or sold.

Sec. 2. It is hereby declared to be unlawful for any person or persons hereafter, without the written consent of the owner or owners thereof, to fill with ginger-ale, soda-water, mineral-water, or other beverage, or any other articles of merchandise, medicine, compound, or preparation, for sale, or to be furnished to customers, any such bottles or boxes, with their names or initials so marked or stamped, or to sell, dispose of, buy, or traffic in, or wantonly destroy any such bottle or box so marked or stamped by the owner or owners thereof, after such owner or owners shall have complied with the provisions of the first section of this act. Any person or persons who shall violate any of the provisions of this act shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and, upon conviction thereof before any court of competent jurisdiction in this state, shall be fined five dollars ($5.00) for each and every box, and fifty cents for each and every bottle so by him, her, or them filled, bought, sold, used, trafficked in, or wantonly destroyed, or by him, her, or them caused to be so filled, bought, sold, used, trafficked in, or wantonly destroyed, together with the costs of suit for the first offense, and ten dollars ($10.00) for each and every box, and one dollar for each and every bottle so filled, bought, sold, used, trafficked in, or wantonly destroyed, or cause to be so filled, bought, sold, used, trafficked in, or wantonly destroyed, together with the costs of suit for each subsequent offense.

Sec. 3. In case the owner or owners of any bottle or box so marked, stamped, and registered as aforesail, shall, in person or by agent, make oath in writing, before any justice of the peace or police

 judge, that he has reason to believe, and does believe, that any manufacturer or bottler of" ginger-ale, seltzer-water, soda, mineral-water, or other beverages, or any other person, is using in any manner by this act declared unlawful, any of the casks, barrels, kegs, bottles, or boxes of such person or his principal, or that any junk-dealer, or other dealer, or manufacturer, or bottler, has any bottle or box secreted in, about, or upon, his, her, or their premises, the said justice of the peace or police judge shall issue his search-warrant, and cause the premises designated to be searched as in other cases where search warrants are issued, as is now provided by law, and in case such bottle or box, with owners' names or initials stamped and registered as aforesaid, shall be found in, upon, or about the premises so designated, the officer executing such search-warrant shall thereupon arrest the person or persons named in such warrant and bring him, her, or them before [the justice of the peace or] police judge who issued such warrant, who shall thereupon hear and determine such case, and, if the accused is found guilty, he, she, or they shall be fined as provided in the second section of this act.

Sec. 4. All cost incurred in the enforcement of the provisions of Costs in such this act shall be assessed and collected in the same manner as in crim- £osed o?.w" inal cases, and all fines collected by virtue of this act shall be turned over by the court collecting the same, in the same manner, and for the same purpose as fines in cases of assault and battery are Jiow by law disposed of.

Sec. 5. This act shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage.

 

                       BOTTLE OF THE WEEK THOMAS WILLIAMS, ROYAL STAG BREWING

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM ONE OF MY FRIENDS IN THE U.K. MICK REEVES HAS AN EXTENSIVE COLLECTION FROM THIS BREWER AND HAS COLLECTED...LIKE ALOT OF US FOR OVER 25 YEARS. NOW HE IS LOOKING FOR THE ICON THAT USED TO STAND IN FRONT OF THE BEWERY...GOOD LUCK MICK, AND THANKS FOR SHARING WITH US..GREAT STUFF. I MANAGED TO FIND A LITTLLE INFO ON THE BREWERY. 

 

THOMAS WILLIAMS & COMPANY
ROYAL STAG BREWERY,WOOBURN, BUCKHAMSHIRE
Thomas Williams & sons operated the Royal Stag Brewery, Wooburn Buckinghamshire from at least 1870 until 1891 when Thomas Williams & Co. Ltd was registered as a limited liability company to aquire the business. The company along with 35 tied houses,was taken over by Thomas Wethered & sons Ltd, Marlow, Buckinghamshire in 1927 and ceased to brew.

 

The former Thomas Wethered Brewery was closed in 1988, and the site has been redeveloped into housing. A small survivor is a brick with 'TW' [Thomas Williams} and the date 1891.Administrative history:

Thomas Wethered and Sons were registered as a limited company in 1899, but the family brewing business clearly dated back to the 18th century. The register of fire insurance policies at Sun Fire Office, 1775-1787, includes entries for George Wethered senior and George Wethered junior, brewers and maltsters, 1779 (policy nos. 412209-10) and Thomas Wethered, brewer, 1785 and 1786 (508143,520427). Owen and Laurence William Wethered of High Street, Marlow, are listed as brewers in Pigot's Bucks Directory of 1842; the name Thomas Wethered and Sons appears in Dutton, Allen and Co's Bucks Directory of 1863.
In 1929 the Company acquired the assets of Thomas Williams and Co. Ltd. of Royal Stag Brewery, Wooburn, which went into voluntary liquidation. The Williams family brewing interests, as is clear from this deposit, date back to the first half of the 19th century; Thomas Williams, brewer, is listed under Wooburn in Pigot's 1842 Directory.
In 1948-49, control of Wethereds was aquired by Strong and Co.Ltd., of Romsey, Hants. Shortly afterwards the assets of Strange and Son Ltd. of Aldermaston Brewery, Berks., were conveyed to Wethereds: material relating to these properties has been transferred to Berkshire and Hampshire Record Offices.
                  BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FRED D. ALLING INK CO. ROCHESTER, N.Y.


FREDERICK DWIGHT ALLING.

Alling's history is best told in his own words. In answer to your secretary's letter he says:

"I was born on the 9th of July, 1843, at Rochester, N. Y., son of William and Martha S. Alling. I studied and prepared for college at the Rochester Collegiate Institute. After leaving college I was employed for two years and a half as clerk and travelling salesman in the stationery trade conducted by Alling & Cory, of this city. In July, 1867, I started in business for myself, in the fine stationery, engraving, and fancy goods line; in 1869 I closed out the fancy goods, stationery, and engraving departments, and devoted myself exclusively to the manufacture of all kinds of ink and mucilage, in which business I am still engaged. Have always resided in this city. Never entered the army, and never participated in any engagement excepting the one which brought me my wife. I was married in this city, May 14th> 1868, to Miss Emily A. McKaye, of Rochester.

"Am now blessed with two girls and a first-class boy. Am a member of the Central Presbyterian Church, of this city, with which I united in June, 1856. Have never sought or held any office except my own business office, which contrives effectually to hold me most of the time. I have accumulated a comfortable competence, but am far from wealthy; have fully established my business, and am selling my manufactures throughout twenty-eight States. Modesty forbids me to enlarge upon the intrinsic merit of my goods; suffice it to say I can and do use them myself, and still live. It is my intention to continue in this line of business. Since leaving college have done some studying and reading, but more writing, although my name has gained a wider celebrity in connection with paper unsullied by ink. I never have met with any grievous physicalfaccident, have never been blessed with twins, and never occupied a 'post-tradership.' My life has been devoid of any especial excitement, and have managed to pursue the uneven tenor of my way in a quiet and tolerably orderly manner.

"Were it possible for me to spare the time to send you a more detailed account of my life, would cheerfully indite the same; but having found sufficient worry* in life without keeping a journal, I have no data to avail myself of, and have to draw liberally on my memory."

 Such is the account our classmate gives of himself. That strict attention and fidelity which marked his college course, always being faithful and regular in his duties, has been continued, and brought him success in life. Alling entered college as Freshman September 12th, 1861, and remained more than three years; it was a source of regret to his classmates that he withdrew at end of the first term Senior. He received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from the college in 1868.

 

 FRED. D. ALLING, ( THIS BEING HIS FIRST LISTED BUSINESS ADDRESS)

Manufacturer of Superior Writing Inks and Office Mucilage— 15a West  Main St.

If twenty years' experience in the manufacture of an article is a guarantee of excellence, the productions of Mr. Alling's labor are unquestionably entitled to the claim of superiority. The firm manufactures a first-class quality of writing ink, which, with their office mucilage, finds a ready and extensive market in all parts of the United States and Canada. The standard reputation of these widely-known goods occasions a continually enlarging demand, to further which the house keeps a number of travelers constantly upon the road. The business is carried on in the commodious premises at No. 155 West Main street, where the staff of employes is kept fully occupied.

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                    BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  VERY SCARCE INTERNAL THREAD POISON

 THIS WEEKS  BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM MY FRIENDS AT POISONOUS ADDICTION, AN UNLISTED VARIANT OF THE KR~27 ENGLISH POISON. THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THIS ONE AND THE NORMALLY FOUND 27 IS THE INTERNAL THREADED STOPPER. THIS WOULD BE THE PROPER STOPPER FOR THIS BOTTLE AS THE ENGLISH BOTTLES ALMOST NEVER HAD ANYTHING BUT CLEAR STOPPERS. THE RIBBING AND EMBOSSED WARNINGS CAME ABOUT AFTER NUMEROUS ACCIDENTAL POISONINGS DUE TO THE LIGHTING OF THE DAY AND JUST PLAIN GRABBING THE WRONG BOTTLE. IN 1859 JOHN SAVORY AND WILLIAM BAKER INTRODUCED THE FIRST ENGLISH PATENTED POISON CONTAINER IN GLASS....IT CAUGHT ON QUICK AND MANY PATENTS FOLLOWED RAPIDLY,IN MY OPINION IT BECAME SOMEWHAT OF A CONTEST IN WHO COULD MAKE THE COOLEST ONE! THIS VARIANT WOULD BE CONSIDERED VERY SCARCE AND STANDS 6 INCHES TALL, THANKS DEB AND STEPHEN FOR A GREAT BOTTLE OF THE WEEK.PLEASE CHECK OUT THEIR GREAT SITE...HERE >  POISONOUSADDICTION 

BELOW ARE SOME OF STEPHENS & DEB'S LATEST

                           BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  STOWER'S BRAND, H.M. LEGGO CO.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK STOWER'S BRAND FROM THE H.M. LEGGO CO.AND  IS FROM MY FRIEND TERRY PHILLIPS COLLECTION, I DID SOME RESEARCH ON THE STOWERS NAME BRAND AND FOUND THE FOLLOWING, THANKS TERRY, GREAT BOTTLE WHICH HELD FOOD PRODUCT. GOTTA LOVE ALL THE EMBOSSING,DATES TO THE EARLY 1900'S.

H.M. LEGGO and CO., Merchants, Importers, Manufacturers, High Street, Bendigo. This extensive firm, which ranks among the leading ones of the kind in the State, was established in 1881 by Mr. F. Rickards, acting as agent for several Melbourne manufacturers, and the present proprietor, Mr. H. M. Leggo, joined him as a clerk a few months after opening, and in 1887 was taken into partnership, which continued up to 1895, when Mr. H. M. Leggo bought his partner (Mr. F. Rickards) out, and has since continued to trade under the style or firm of H. M. Leggo and Co., and has succeeded in building up one of the largest businesses in the State. Commencing on a small si;ale, the firm has extended its operations until now the head establishment has a large frontage to High Street and another to Short Street. This latter was obtained by the firm acquiring, in 1898, the old Short Street skating rink, which has been converted into a factory for the  manufacture of various household necessities, including vinegar, pickles, sauces, cordials, baking powder, disinfectants, and numerous other commodities. The success achieved in this direction induced the firm to make a further extension, and when the old-established business of the late Mr. Wm. Budden, wholesale coffee and spice merchant, was offered for sale, Messrs. H. M. Leggo and Co. purchased it. The Sandhurst Coffee and Spice Works were established in 1852 by Mr. Steane, who was succeeded in 1863 by Mr. Wm. Budden as a wholesale coffee and spice merchant and commission agent, and at the time of his death the establishment in Williamson Street had achieved a considerable  reputation, which is being thoroughly upheld by the new proprietors in their new departure. The main entrance to the firm's head establishment is in High Street, immediately above Charing Cross. The premises arc splendidly fitted up, and the firm carries an enormous stock of general merchandise. H. M. Leggo and Co. are agents for T. B. Guest and Co., biscuit manufacturers; MacRobertson and Co., confectioners, of Melbourne; and hold the sole agency of the "Nirvana" Tea Company, Ceylon, special apartments being fitted up for the blending and packing of teas. In connection with the business of the late Mr. Budden, the firm retains the sole agency for Messrs. Swallow and Aricll's biscuits, cakes, jams, ;ind their other manufactures. fn addition to a large stock of coarse salt obtained from the lakes north of Bendigo, in which the firm do a very large business throughout the States, may be seen quantities of salt of different grades down to the very finest procurable, also rock salt for cattle and horses. Under capable management the manufacturing department of Messrs. H. M. Leggo and Co. turn out the goods which, under the trade marks of "Hercules," "White Flake," "Bed Star," "Red Hand," and "Lion," are now familiar in every household in the State. Naturally the production of these has opened up a market for quantities of local raw materials, which in the ordinary course of events would have had to look for a market in Melbourne or some other centre where a factory of the kind is established, this being especially applicable to flour, tomatoes, beans, cucumbers, cauliflowers, and innumerable other kinds of vegetables. The enormous extension of the premises in High and Short Streets, together with the old-established coffee-roasting and grinding and wholesale spice warehouse of the late Mr. Budden in Williamson Street, shows a vast amount of energy and enterprise, which well deserves the lavish patronage bestowed upon the firm by the Bendigo public, who have not been slow to acknowledge the benefits of this new and profitable industry which has been established in their midst.

 

       BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  RARE H.H. WARNER'S DIABETE'S CURE, ROCHESTER N.Y.


THIS WEEKS  BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM PAMELA LYNN KITZELMAN HEGEDUS OR (BOTTLE CINDY) FROM PENNSYLVANIA WHO HAS A BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ONE TIME BEFORE. THIS IS A VERY HARD TO GET WARNERS SAFE DIABETES CURE FROM THE WARNERS COMPANY, ROCHESTER NEW YORK. PAMELA ALSO HAS AN IMPRESSIVE RUN OF WARNERS AS SHOWN AND INCLUDING (NOT PICTURED) A TIPPECANOE BITTERS.

WARNERS SAFE DIABETES CURE WAS ONE OF THE FIRST CURES OFFERED BY WARNERS IN 1879, THE COMPANY WENT ON TO MAKE MANY MANY MORE CURES AND SAFE REMEY'S EXPANDING TO OTHER COUNTRIES INCLUDING FRANCE AND ENGLAND AND AUSTRALIA TO NAME A FEW. THE LINK BELOW IS A GREAT PLACE TO FIND ANYTHING WARNERS...ANYTHING!!

WARNERS SAFE CURE BLOG

SO THANK YOU PAMELA FOR YET ANOTHER GREAT BOTTLE, BE SURE TO CHECK OUT HER PHOTO ALBUM UNDER MEMBERS ALBUMS PAGE.

H.H. WARNER LIVED FROM 1842 ~ 1923 AND BUILT QUITE A REMARKABLE EMPIRE RIGHT HERE IN NEW YORK STATE, ROCHESTER TO BE PRECISE.

 BOTTLE OF THE WEEK RARE SPRINGBROOK DAIRY, MYRTLE POINT B.C.

SPRINGBROOK DAIRY, MYRTLE POINT  BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS ANOTHER FROM MY FRIEND TERRY PHILLIPS IN B.C., A RARE MILK BOTTLE AND AS FAR AS ANYONE KNOWS IT IS A ONE OFF AT THIS POINT. I DO KNOW THAT IT IS THE FIRST MILK I HAVE HAD THE PLEASURE OF RUNNING AS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK. "SPRINGBROOK DAIRY,MYRTLE POINT B.C."  HE ALSO FOUND ME SOME INTERESTING INFORMATION TO ADD WITH IT. THANKS VERY MUCH TERRY FOR ANOTHER GREAT BOTTLE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  RIGHT IS AN ARTICLE ABOUT MYRTLE POINT, NAMED AFTER THE  DAUGHTER OF ONE OF THE FIRST FAMILYS THAT SETTLED THERE. THE MC CORMICK FAMILY WAS LIVING THERE IN 1880'S WHEN MR. GRAHAM WENT TO THE POINT TO LOG IT. BY 1918 THE POPULATION WAS AROUND 40-50 PEOPLE. THE LOGGERS IN THAT AREA MOSTLY LIVED OFF IN THE WOODS.

 

                  BOTTLE OF THE WEEK THORPE'S OLDE FASHIONED GINGER BEER

 

 

  Ginger beer, which is the type of this class, is prepared by adding sugar and citric acid to a dilute infusion of ginger root, infecting the liquid with a small quantity of a suitable yeast, bottling it, and allowing the bottles to stand at a proper temperature until sufficient fermentation has taken place. As a rule the fermented liquid contains less than 1 p.c. of absolute alcohol, but occasionally in very hot weather tho fermentation may proceed much further, and the ginger beer may then contain as much as 5 or 6 p.c. of alcohol. The pressure in the bottle of ginger beer when ready for consumption averages about 15 lbs. to the square inch, but in cases of abnormal fermentation it may reach 100 lbs. or more, and burst the bottle. Occasionally objectionable flavours are produced by infection of the liquid with wild yeasts or bacteria, just as in the case of ordinary beer. Other drinks of this description are horehound beer and other herb beers. Certain nonalcoholic ales on the market are prepared by partial fermentation of an infusion of malt and hops, which is then used as a syrup, and bottled with aerated water as in the case of lemonade

 

 HERE IS THE BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  OR SHOULD I SAY BOTTLES OF THE WEEK. MY FRIEND TERRY PHILLIPS FROM B.C. HAS DUG QUITE A COLLECTION OF THEM AND EVEN HAS HAD SOME OF HIS DIGGING STORIES PUBLISHED AS SEEN AT LEFT. I MANAGED TOO FIND A LITTLE INFO ON THE COMPANY BUT IT IS AS SCARCE AS THE BOTTLES ARE. THANKS TERRY FOR SHARING YOUR GREAT STUFF.

Fraser Valley Antique and Collectibles Club, a 140-member group of heritage buffs. Most of them started off as bottle collectors -- guys (and it's almost always guys) who dig around old building or garbage sites looking for century-old bottles or stoneware from Vancouver's early days.

Al Reilly is something of a legend in the club. At one point, he figures he had 60,000 items relating to B.C.
At one point, Reilly figures he had 5,000 bottles. He only has a handful left, including a Thorpe & Co. Ginger Beer bottle and a Doering & Marstrand beer bottle. Both are made of stoneware, and are highly prized.

"There's one [Thorpe bottle] that has three cities on it, Vancouver, Victoria and Vernon," notes Reilly, who started collecting B.C. stuff in 1971, supplementing his bottle digs with finds from flea markets and garage sales.

"That one's worth $100. This one [which is just Victoria] is worth about $30. [The Doering bottle] is not complete, but it's still worth $100 because it's rare. That was a fault of that bottle, the top broke on them."

Ginger beer stoneware is a hot collectible -- there are about 80 different B.C. ginger beers. There's even a book about them, Pioneer Soda Water Companies of British Columbia by Bill Wilson.

The most desirable ginger beer is a Meikle Brothers bottle with a bear logo.

"Eight or nine are known," says Lorne Dennison, the president of the Fraser Valley club.

"One of them changed hands at the show a couple of years ago. Recently at an auction in eastern Canada one surfaced and it sold for $3,400. And that particular one was damaged."

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  A VERY RARE COCA~COLA HUTCHINSON BOTTLE, ALABAMA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS A VERY RARE COCA~COLA HUTCH SINCE THEY WERE REALLY ONLY MADE A COUPLE THREE YEARS, THAT MY FRIEND RANDY HALL DUG IN ALABAMA.HE HAS DUG MORE THAN A COUPLE HEARTBREAKERS OF THIS RARE BOTTLE SO YOU CAN IMAGINE HIS EXCITEMENT WHEN THIS ONE CAME OUT WHOLE. GREAT FIND FIND RANDY,AND I JUST MIGHT TAKE YOU UP ON THAT OFFER TO COME DOWN AND DIG ,SINCE YOU SAY THE HOLE IS NOT EMPTY YET !!

 

 "I dug this bottle in Pratt city,  Alabama. I saw the bottom of it in the hole but I thought it was a common hutch,I cleaned out the hole and then saw BCC on the bottom and knew what it was. I have dug for over 40 years and this is the best find I ever dug. Thanks Randy Hall
Hoover Alabama"

THANKS VERY MUCH RANDY FOR SHARING YOUR AMAZING FIND, BEST LUCK LOOKING FOR THE NEXT ONE !!

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK    CHARLES HEIMSTREET HAIR COLOR  TROY N.Y.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS A POPULAR HAIR BOTTLE AVAILABLE IN PONTILED AND NON~PONTILED VARIANTS FROM TROY N.Y. THIS BOTTLE IS ONLY SEEN IN VARIATIONS OF BLUE AND NEVER IS NOT A GOOD SELL. 

WEEK 65 !! 

 

 

 CHARLES HEIMSREET ~ TROY NEW YORK

 

Charles Heimstreet was listed as a Druggist in Troy New York from 1835 till 1855. His business was at 10 State Street. In 1845, the company was called Heimstreet & Bigelow (Edmond), Mfg Druggists. Starting in 1848, William E. Hagan began working with Heimstreet as a Clerk (see Hagan). The same year Bigelow was no longer listed. According to the Wilsons, Heimstreet's brother Stephen had joined him in 1838, and managed the bottled medicine line. The Wilsons also said that Heimstreet had died in 1855 and the company dissolved soon after. 
Heimstreet's Inimitable Hair Coloring (2)
 
Hagan took over as the Proprietor of the establishment from 1851 to 1861. In an ad on Oct 1, 1859, W.E. Hagan, Troy, NY already Proprietor, indicates fifteen years of experience. The label on some of the C. Heimstreet bottles said they contained "W.E. Hagan's Hair Coloring." It is not known when Hagan made this label change. At some point Demas Barnes took over proprietorship of Hagan's articles, including this hair coloring. He advertised the Hair Coloring in 1862. An ad in the 1875 John F. Henry, Curran & Co. catalog (view), listed two sizes of the bottles. In the 1885 McKesson & Robbin's catalog, I found a listing that called the product "Hagan's or Heimstreet's Hair Dye." The last reference I found to the product was in the 1898 National Druggist.

 BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR COMES FROM KAYLEE IN KANSAS.      A FAVORITE BOTW  !!

 

Emerson Bromo-Seltzer Tower - Baltimore, Maryland
This historic structure, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was modeled after the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, Italy. It was completed in 1911 and has been a Baltimore landmark ever since. The tower was designed by Joseph Evans Sperry and built by Captain Isaac Emerson, the inventor of Bromo-Seltzer. The tower was originally topped with a 51-foot revolving replica of the blue Bromo-Seltzer bottle, which was illuminated by 596 lights and could be seen from 20 miles away. The four clock faces are all still working; however, the bottle had to be removed in 1936 due to structural concerns.

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS A GREAT LITTLE COBALT BLUE "BROMO~SELTZER" FROM THE EMERSON DRUG CO. IN MARYLAND.THIS COMES FROM AN EIGHT YEAR OLD COLLECTOR IN KANSAS.

"Dear mr ricksbottleroom my dad said he thought maybe this was not a really rare bottle but my grampa and me found it way under ground behind his oldd barn and its my favorite because its blue and my grandpa helped me find it.and my dad got me a picture thanks alot if you make it this week bottle. Kaylee, from Kansas usa

 WELL..THANK YOU VERY MUCH KAYLEE FROM KANSAS, I HAVE FOUND QUITE A FEW OF THEM SINCE I WAS YOUR AGE AND I DON'T THINK I HAVE EVER SEEN ONE AS NICE AS YOURS. I ADDED A PICTURE AND STORY ABOUT THE BROMO~SELTZER BUILDING IN MARYLAND FOR YOU TO CHECK OUT,KEEP ON COLLECTING, AND THANKS AGAIN FOR SHARING YOUR GREAT FIND WITH US.