RICKS BOTTLE ROOM.COM

~ ALWAYS IN PURSUIT OF GREAT GLASS ~ © 2007 ~

SOME BLOB TOPS

PLEASE ACKNOWLEDGE MY SITE IF USING ANY CONTENT, PICTURES & TEXT. THANK YOU



WELCOME TO MY BLOBS PAGE, HERE ON THIS PAGE & ALSO ON MY LOCAL STUFF PAGE ARE JUST SOME OF MY BLOB TOPS,JUST UNDER HALF OF THE 370 TOTAL I HAVE AT THIS POINT,ALWAYS GETTING MORE  I HAVE ALWAYS LIKED BLOBS AND NEVER REALLY STOPPED GATHERING THEM WHEN DOING POISONS AND OTHER STUFF. I AM NOW PRETTY MUCH GOING AFTER COLORED AND PICTURE BLOBS..... THEY ARE MOSTLY FROM THE LATE 1870'S UP UNTIL THE CROWN TOP AND AUTOMATIC BOTTLE MACHINE LIKE OWENS CAME ALONG AND I SAY "TOOK THE CLASS OUT OF GLASS" SO A DATE...1920'S.

 

THE RAREST ARE FOUND IN TEAL,COBALT AND VARIANTS OF GREENS, THERE ARE SOME GREAT EXAMPLES OUT THERE AND SOME UNIQUE COLORS AND I DON'T THINK YOU COULD EVER RUN OUT OF MORE TO GET MAKING THEM A GREAT COLLECTION TO GET INTO FOR STARTER AND SEASONED COLLECTORS ALIKE.

 

 I HAVE MANY MORE TO POST AND I AM ADDING MORE ALL THE TIME.I WILL BE SLOWLY REPLACING THE PLAIN BACKGROUND SHOTS & WILL PROBABLY EVENTUALLY MOVE THE CLEAR AND AQUA ONES FROM OTHER STATES THAN NEW YORK MOSTLY BECAUSE OF THE NUMBER OF ONES  AVAILABLE FROM NEW YORK STATE.


IF YOU HAVE A BLOB OR ANY BOTTLE YOU WOULD LIKE MORE INFORMATION ON,PLEASE POST IT IN MEMBERS BLOG CLICK THE "CONTACT ME" TABS ON LEFT SIDE OF PAGES, IS VERY QUICK AND THEY COME UP ON MY BLACKBERRY RIGHT AWAY OR EMAIL ME { ADMIN@RICKSBOTTLEROOM.COM } A PICTURE AND I WILL POST IT &  RESEARCH IT FOR YOU. THANKS FOR STOPPING BY AND CHECK BACK OFTEN AS I AM ALWAYS CHANGING AND ADDING TO MY SITE. THANKS.

 

I AM ALWAYS INTERESTED IN BUYING/TRADING BOTTLES AS WELL.  CLICK ON THE "CONTACT ME" TAB AT THE LEFT OF EACH PAGE AND SEND ME THE INFO. IF YOU HAVE SOMETHING YOU ARE INTERESTED IN SELLING OR TRADING.

CREDIT DUE A COUPLE SITES THAT ARE A GREAT HELP WITH INFORMATION

 * THANKS VERY MUCH TO TAVERNTROVE.COM FOR SOME OF MY DATING INFO., I WILL BE DONATING INFO TO THEM AS WELL FOR A HUGE PROJECT THEY ARE WORKING ON. PLEASE CHECK OUT THEIR VERY WELL DONE SITE HERE. TAVERN TROVE

*THANKS ALSO GO TO THE  TRAYMAN.NET FOR MANY OF THE TRAY PICTURES, YET ANOTHER PRICELESS RESEARCH TOOL, I HAVE A LINK HERE. PLEASE VISIT, YOU WILL NOT BE DISAPPOINTED IT IS A VERY WELL DONE SITE.  TRAYMAN.NET

SOME ALBANY NEW YORK BREWING HISTORY

AMONG THE MORE PROMINENT BREWERIES OF THE 1800S WAS DOBLER BREWERY,ORIGINALLY THE HINKEL BREWERY,LOCATED IN A COMPLEX OF SHOPS AND INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS THAT EXTENDED FROM ELM ST. TO PARK AVE.ALONG BOTH SIDES OF PRESENT DAY SWAN ST. PART OF THE OLD HINKEL BREWERY STILL STANDS OVERLOOKING LINCOLN PARK AND IS CONSIDERED ONE OF THE FINEST  EXAMPLES OF 19TH CENTURY ARCHITECTURE REMAINING IN THE CITY.
GEORGE AMSDELL'S GREAT BREWERY STILL STANDS TOO, ALTHOUGH FEW WOULD RECOGNIZE IT TODAY. DURING PROHIBITION IT WAS  CONVERTED INTO KNICKERBOCKER APARTMENTS,WHICH OCCUPY THE BLOCK
BETWEEN LANCASTER AND JAY ON DOVE ST. THE HEDRICK BREWERY STARTED IN 1852,WAS FAMOUS FOR ITS OWNERSHIP BY THE LATE DANIAL O'CONNELL,LONGTIME POLITICAL PATRIARCH OF THE CITY'S DEMOCRATIC ORGANIZATION.THE BREWERY WAS LOCATED AT 400 CENTRAL AVE,THE PRESENT SITE OF THE  HIGH RISE APARTMENT BUILDING KNOWN AS CENTRAL TOWERS. ANOTHER OF ALBANY'S POLITICAL FIGURES,MICHEAL NOLAN,THE CITY'S FIRST IRISH CATHOLIC MAYOR,ACHIEVED  FAME AND FORTUNE AS THE PRESIDENT OF QUINN AND NOLAN,LATER KNOWN AS THE BEVERWYCK BREWERY,IN NORTH ALBANY. PURCHASED BY  THE F & M SCHAEFER BREWING CO., IT WAS THE CITY'S LAST REMAINING BREWERY UNTIL THE 1970S, WHEN IT WAS CLOSED AND THE BUILDINGS WERE DEMOLISHED. FOR MANY YEARS THE F& M SCHAEFER BREWING CO. WAS KNOWN FOR ITS ALL NIGHT BEER FOUNTAIN, WHERE MANY LATE NIGHT  WORKER OR REPORTER WOULD STOP FOR A FINAL TOAST TO THE EVENING, AND ALSO FOR THE GREAT STATUE OF KING GANBRINUS  THAT STOOD WITH FOAMING STEIN ALOFT LOOKING DOWN ON THE HUNDREDS OF NORTH ALBANY WORKERS WHO DAILY PRODUCED THE SUDSY BREW. LIKE MANY OF THE BREWERIES, A NUMBER OF 1800S DISTILLERIES WERE ASSOCIATED WITH THE NAMES OF POLITICIANS , AMONG THEM,   CITY ALDERMAN EVERS, TRACY AND BOYD. THEIR DISTILLERIES, IN THE DAYS PRIOR TO MODERN ZONING, STOOD IN THE MIDST OF  RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOODS IN SHERIDAN HOLLOW AND IN THE CITY'S SOUTH END.

THERE IS MORE BREWING HISTORY AND INFORMATION ON THE BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE AND ALSO MUCH MORE ON INFO~RESEARCH PAGE. IF YOU CANNOT FIND IT HERE ON MY SITE.......PLEASE LET ME KNOW, THANK YOU.

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STOPPERS USED ON BLOB TOP BOTTLES

Baltimore loop seal illustration; click to enlarge.

Lightning closure on an 1890's California beer bottle. Baltimore Loop-on left, This functional and fairly popular closure was patented by William Painter, a Baltimore machine shop foreman, in September of 1885, The closure itself is a plug or disk made of rubber or other flexible material with the bottom surface convex shaped.  The disk fit tightly into a groove ("reverse taper") circling the inside of the bottle's bore.  Internal pressure from the carbonation pressed against the convex surface resulting in lateral pressure which held the disk firmly in the groove.  An imbedded wire shank in the top of the disk was used, in conjunction with a hook or pointed instrument, to pull the seal from the bore of the bottle and access the contents.

 

 The "lightning" toggle-type closure was used on a lot of different bottle types, though its primary application was for carbonated beverages (soda, beer) and canning jars.  The sealing surface for these two main types of lightning-type closures was different; that information is found below.  There have been many subtle variations and imitations of this style; thus the reference to "lightning-type" closure.  This important closure was invented and patented first by Charles de Quillfeldt of New York City on January 5, 1875.  The design was intended initially forIllustration of the lightning closure by itself; click to enlarge. beverage bottles.
The seal was composed of a neck tie-wire, a lever wire, and a bail.  The bail passed through a hole in the metal, rubber faced, lid.  The lever wire was
Close-up of a Hutter "Lightning" closure; click to enlarge.hooked into loops in the heavy neck tie-wire on opposite sides of the bottle.  Movement of the lever wire past the line of centers of force was stopped by the neck of the bottle." The illustration to the right shows the configuration of the closure without the bottle (Lief 1965, courtesy of the Glass Container Manufacturers Institute).  The actual "stopper" or lid portion of this closure was usually made from either metal or porcelain/ceramic with a round rubber gasket attached to the shank of the stopper to seal the bottle (gasket shows in picture below).  The picture above is of a lightning closure with a metal lid with the gasket missing.


Close-up of a Hutter "Lightning" closure,Shortly after patenting the design, de Quillfeldt sold the patent rights to several individuals, including Henry Putnam (for fruit jars primarily) and Karl Hutter (beverage bottles).  The history of competing designs, contentiousness, and lawsuits between these and other individuals using this basic form of closure is fascinating. Pictured to the left is a lightning-type closure,common between 1890 and 1915, which is marked on the underside of the ceramic stopper with "Hutter's Patent."  The sealing surface for small bore (beverage type) lightning-type closures was the top lip surface and extreme upper portion of the bore just inside the bottle; where the rubber gasket shows to the left.  As one can see in comparing the Hutter closure with the other two pictured beer bottles, there are no real functional
differences between them.
Other lightning-type toggle closures with variably subtle differences though still with the toggle portion at the lower part of the finish or upper neck,  were
patented by F. Perry (1878),  N. Fritzner (1880), E. Manning (1896), L. Brome (1899), J. Alston (1900), F. Thatcher (1901) Lower left pic., M. Landenberger (1901), W. Cunningham (1901), L. Strebel (1903), and others.  Closure names included the "Electric" (1889), "Pittsburgh" (1889), "Porcelain-special" (date unknown), and others (Berge 1980).  All of these variations saw some limited use during the same period as the "true" lightning closures.  The bottles these lightning type closures are found on date in the same range, though likely closer to the actual patent date since none received the widespread acceptance of the original lightning.   During this same era there were numerous related closures that utilized a toggle or "lever" on top of the closure instead of below like with the lightning-types.  The Walker Patent stopper on the right for an example of one - the James T. Walker 1885 patented closure.  For more information on soda & beer closures, see Graci's book (Graci 2003).
Lightning-type closures were most popular on beer and many soda bottles from the 1880's into the 1920's.  Use after that time was limited though occasional.

(courtesy of  http://www.sha.org/bottle/index.htm )

BUNKER HILL LAGER ~  A.G. VAN NOSTRAND, CHARLESTOWN MASS.

BUNKER HILL LAGER

HERE IS AN AWESOME BLOB , THIS IS A SCARE LAGER BOTTLE FROM THE A.G. VAN NOSTRAND'S BUNKER HILL BREWERIES IN CHARLESTOWN,MASS.AT 40 ALFORD STREET.THERE ARE VERY FEW BLOBS WITH THE FLUTING ON NECK AND AROUND BASE, THIS BOTTLE HAS IT ALL.  THIS COMPANY WAS IN BUSINESS FROM 1821 UNTIL 1934 RANGE, THE BREWERY WAS CLOSED FROM 1918 UNTIL 1933 WHEN IT RESUMED BUSINESS FOR ONE YEAR AS BUNKER HILL.BREWING  THEN ONE YEAR (1934) AS VAN STRAND BREWING. THEY BREWED VERY POPULAR ALES AND LAGERS. TO INCLUDE  THE FOLLOWING ~ IN THE ALE BREWERY, OLD MUSTY ALE & PB (PUREST AND BEST) ALE, A VERY POPULAR ALE. ON THE LAGER SIDE OF THINGS THEY PRODUCED BOSTON CLUB LAGER AND THIS ONE, BUNKER HILL LAGER. 

"Van Nostrand, Alonzo Gilford, Business President and Capitalist, of 482 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass., was born July 4, 1854, in Brooklyn, N.Y. He graduated from the English High School of Boston, Mass. In 1872-75 he was employed in his father's brewery in Charlestown, Mass.; was admitted as a partner in 1878. He is proprietor of the Bunker Hill Brewery; and connected with several other business enterprises. He is a member of the Boston Chamber of Commerce, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Comrany and the Bostonian Society. He has traveled extensively, and in 1907 made a trip around the World. He is a member of the Merchants Club, the Boston City Club, the Eastern Yacht Club, the City Club of New York, the Beverly Yacht Club, the Sphinx Club and various other clubs and society

ALONZO G. VAN NOSTRAMO

Dutch forbears, can turn to the maternal line and trace his ancestry from those who settled in New England, who suffered the deprivations of the early colonists, who participated in the wars with the Indians and French and finally in the Revolution, and who helped to make this part of the United States what it is to-day. Mr. Van Nostrand's mother's maiden name was Mehetabel Bradlee. She is the daughter of Thomas and Ann (Howard) Bradlee, and was born in the old house at the corner of Tremont and Hollis Streets in Boston, from which her grandfather and other patriots disguised as Indians sallied forth as members of the Boston Tea Party in 1773. Her ancestor in direct line was Daniel Bradley, who came from London in 1635 in the ship Elizabeth, settling in Haverhill, Massachusetts, where he was killed in the Indian Massacre of August 13, 1689.

Alonzo G. Van Nostrand was born July 4, 1854. He was not quite eighteen years of age when, graduating from the English High School, he was given a clerkship in the small brewery on Alford Street. During the three years following he worked his way through every department, gaining a comprehensive and practical knowledge of the business and its possibilities. In 1875 he was taken into partnership by his father. Thereafter the development of the plant and the business was steady and significant. It was in 1875 that the P. B. trade mark was originated and adopted. A bottling building was erected, with a storage capacity of 240,000 bottles. In 1891 the brewing of Bunker Hill Lager was begun in a new brewery. Later another brew house was completed at a cost of $100,000 to meet the increasing demand. At the present time the breweries cover an entire block of four acres and there is no room for further expansion, except by increasing the height of buildings.  Mr. Van Nostrand made a trip around the world in 1907. He is married and has one son now in Harvard College. Mrs. Van Nostrand's maiden name was Jane Bradford Eldridge. She is a daughter of Captain Eldridge, of Fairhaven, and is a lineal descendant of Governor Bradford, of the Plymouth Colony, who landed from the Mayflower in 1620. Mr. and Mrs. Van Nostrand occupy the Van Nostrand residence at 482 Beacon Street.  Mr. Van Nostrand holds membership in a score or more of clubs and associations, including art and historical societies in Boston and New York, and is a member of the leading yacht clubs.

ALONZO G. VAN NOSTRAND

He considers that the best advice that he can offer to young men just starting in life can be tersely stated as follows:

"Be honest, and particularly with yourself. Concentrate your efforts on one thing at a time. Undertake only what you believe you can accomplish, but when once started, never give up."

Mr. Van Nostrand has developed a group of splendid, modern brewery buildings, each equipped for a special purpose, but those buildings would be useless, that equipment would rust in idleness, were it not for the fact that, in the midst of intense competition and in resistance of the constant temptation to consolidate forces and reduce standards, he has chosen his own path, has sought to produce, without regard to cost, malt beverages that will surpass any of domestic brewing and will compare with the best of Europe, and has made the P. B. Brewery the standard by which all others in New England are gaged, or seek to be gaged, in public estimate. And that takes us back to the original point that pride of ancestry is a good thing and that business ability is better; but that, when pride of ancestry and superlative business ability are blended and aged in the vat of commercial experience, the output is inevitably as good as can be asked for, the best that can be obtained.

BUNKER HILL LAGER AD'S CIRCA LATE 1800'S



PICTURED TO THE LEFT IS AN 1898 ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BUNKER HILL BREWERY CALLED "THE WOMAN IN WHITE" AND ON THE RIGHT IS A SLIGHTLY EARLIER AD FROM AROUND 1890 RANGE.
 
 
JOHN RYAN EXCELSIOR SODA WORKS  1866

A RECENT TRADE, JOHN RYAN EXCELSIOR SODA WORKS SAVANNAH GEORGIA 1866

PONTILED AND IN A GREAT SHADE OF COBALT.

 

JOHN RYAN?S EXCELSIOR BOTTLE WORKS

On this site in 1852 stood the Excelsior Bottle Works operated by John Ryan for the manufacture of soda water and other carbonated beverages. Ryan?s soda, in colorful bottles embossed with his name and location, was known throughout Georgia. His operations expanded to Augusta, Columbus and Atlanta. Today Ryan?s bottles are prized by collectors nationwide. John Ryan with his contemporaries, Thomas Maher and James Ray, is commemorated for his pioneer contribution to the soda water industry in Georgia and the United States. Ryan retired from business in 1879 and passed away in Savannah on March 23, 1885

HARTMANN & FEHRENBACH BREWING CO. ~ E.C. ROSCHE ABC SPARKLING LAGER, ALBANY

 
ONE OF MY LATEST ADDITIONS TO MY COLLECTION, WHAT A GREAT PICTURE BLOB THIS ONE IS. A PEGASUS SURROUNDED BY EMBOSSING AND WITHOUT ANY DAMAGE.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In 1865 John Hartmann and John Fehrenbach, the proprietors of a large saloon at the northwest corner of Fourth and French streets, began the brewing of lager beer in a small way and from that start grew the large brewery of Hartmann & Fehrenbach's Brewery, at the corner of Lovering Avenue and Scott Street, was originated by John Hartmann and John Fehrenbach, at the same site in 1866. The first buildings used were frame, which were fitted out with a capacity to produce thirty barrels of lager beer daily. They continued with such facilities until 1878, when the old buildings were removed and a large three-story brick building erected and fitted out with improved machinery and apparatus, the entire cost being forty thousand dollars. The motive force is supplied by an engine and two boilers, one of eighty and the other of fifty horse-power. A large refrigerator has recently been placed in the brewery. The present capacity of manufacture is thirty-five thousand barrels annually. The beer made here is consumed in Wilmington and the towns of the Peninsula, and a prosperous business is done. In 1885 an incorporated company was formed with John Hartmann, president; John G. Hartmann, vice-president; and John Fehrenbach, secretary and treasurer. The other members of the company are J. G. Fehrenbach and Charles Fehrenbach. Sixteen men are employed, and the brewery is constantly in operation.
 
 Trade names for the brewery at Lovering Avenue & Scott Street, Wilmington, Delaware.  Hartmann & Fehrenbach, originally addressed 4th & French Streets 1865-1885 Hartmann & Fehrenbach Brewing Co. (Readdressed) 1885-1920 Closed by National Prohibition in 1920  Status of the brewery property is unknown.        Products: Standard Beer  1885 - 1920  Vienna Export Beer  1885 - 1920
 
 E.C.ROSCHE SPARKLING LAGER ALBANY NY
 
LETTER TO AMERICAN BOTTLER 1907
" Enclosed please find check for $3.00 for subscription for 1908.

Allow me to congratulate the management of The American P.ottler for the progressive spirit of its editorials. It is certainly The American Bottler to which all bottlers naturally turn for information.

I am pleased to note that advertisers seem to appreciate this fact, and I predict for it a greater success in the near future.

A journal committed to the cause of the bottlers devoted to their interests, must commend itself to those who advertise.

With best wishes, I remain, yours very truly,

E. C. Rosche"
 
 
ROBERT PORTNER BREWING CO. ~ ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA
MY LATEST ADDITION, ROBERT PORTNER BREWING COMPANY, ALEXANDRIA VIRGINIA ~ TIVOLI BEER
WHAT A GREAT COLOR BOTTLE, WHITTLED ALL OVER AND AN AMBER STRIATION THAT IS SEEN IN FRONT CENTER AND RUNS ALL AROUND THE BOTTLE. A VERY SCARCE BOTTLE. HERE IS A LINK TO A GREAT ARTICLE ABOUT ROBERT PORTNER'S GREAT GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER STUDYING TO BE A BREWER AND REVIVE THE FAMILY BUSINESS...AWESOME, WISH HER ALL THE LUCK. A Brewing Legacy
 
 
 
Company Names, addresses, dates1:
  Portner & Recker, 146 King c. St Asaph, Alexandria VA (1863-1864)   Portner & Co, King & Fayette Sts, Alexandria VA (1864)  Portner & Winteroll, 285 King St, Alexandria VA (1866-1867)
  Robert Portner Fayette corner King St, Alexandria VA (1866-1867)  Robert Portner St. Asaph corner Wythe St, Alexandria VA (1871-1916)

Portner was also in Washington DC:  Company Names, addresses, dates2:
  Robert Portner, 626 Va Ave SW Washington DC (1877-1884)  Robert Portner Brewing Co, 626 Va Ave SW Washington DC (1885-1890)


Robert Portner's Brewing, Alexandria.

The new dry law closed numerous distillers, six breweries, as well as several hundred saloons, in addition to taking away business from bottling companies and distributors. Breweries and distillers were allowed to stay in business so long as they sold their product out of state. Five of the six Virginia breweries stayed open until 1918. Only Robert Portner?s in Alexandria closed immediately. Because the Mapp Law prohibited the production all malt beverages for instate use, even near beer, several breweries turned to making soda pop and bottled water instead. For example, Richmond's Home Brewing Company became the Home Products Company and made soft drinks. The Virginia Brewing Company in Roanoke attempted to survive prohibition the same way.


 the Robert Portner Brewing Company operated in Alexandria for almost 50 years. It grew to become the largest brewery in the southern United States, and was Alexandria?s largest employer. The company thrived until 1915, when Prohibition came to Virginia, and the brewery went out of business

 Robert Portner was a millionaire brewer who lived in Alexandria, Virginia and Washington, D.C., and often spent his summers in Manassas, Virginia. He owned several of the biggest breweries in the South at the time. Born March 20, 1837 in Rhaden, Prussia, he came to America in 1853 and started his legacy. He married Anna von Valaer in 1872 and they had 13 children. He began his career working in a grocery store in New York, and eventually became one of the foremost businessmen in the country. When he died in 1906, Portners estate was worth 1.9 million. Many innovations that Robert Portner helped create, include his invention of what is believed to be the first air-conditioning system in the U. S. His empire crumbled when Prohibition swept the country.  Roberts beloved summer home in Manassas, which he designed for himself and his family, was probably the first fully air-conditioned home in the country; its grounds included a dairy, deer park and a man-made lake, complete with swans.


Washington Evening Star. July 25, 1891

    A BIG BREWING ESTABLISHMENT  NATIONAL CAPITAL BREWERY   A Business Enterprise That Has Been Very Successful in Washington

    IT IS A HOME PRODUCT ENTIRELY ORGANIZED AND OFFICERED BY LOCAL MEN AND EVERY SHARE OF ITS STOCK OWNED HERE A TRIP THROUGH ITS EXTENSIVE BUILDINGS.

  The National Capital Brewery Company is a combination of the firms of Albert Carry, Robert Portner and the Robert Portner Brewing Company, the latter selling out the Washington branch of the business. The capital stock of the company is $500,000, all paid up. The company has been in operation since last November [1890], but has been supplying from its new brewery only since June. The officers of the company are as follows: Albert Carry, president; C. A. Strangmann, secretary and treasurer. Directors: Albert Carry, Robert Portner, John L. Vogt, John D. Bartlett, Charles Carry, C. A. Strangmann, Frank P.Madigan.

    A brewery that turns out 100,000 barrels of first-class pure beer every year for local consumption solely is a big institution for any city, and yet Washington has recently had just such an addition made to its business enterprises in the National Capital Brewery. Organized by Washington men, officered by Washington men, and with every share of its stock owned here at home, it would seem to be a local enterprise first last and all the time.

    This business is the result of the combination of two of the oldest and most successful breweries in this part of the country, and that the new firm will be even more successful is a foregone conclusion. People who have had occasion recently to traverse D street southeast have noticed a splendid new building on the south side of the street between 13th and 14th streets. This is the new home of the National Capital Brewing Company, and it is by long odds one of the most substantial and imposing buildings of the sort to be found anywhere. Although it has been completed hardly more than a month, it has about it already that well-kept appearance and air of bustling activity that always denote prosperity following upon enterprise.

    This fine new building, standing as it does in a very desirable location for such a business, with almost an entire block of ground about it, is a five-story structure of brick with handsome stone trimmings and surrounded by a graceful cupola. It covers a plot of ground 94 by 136 feet, and owing to the unusual height of the several stories the building itself is quite as high as an ordinary seven or eight-story building. Attached to the main building are several roomy and substantial outbuildings, including an engine house, stable and cooperage shop, all pleasing in appearance and forming a handsome group.

    To make a good pure quality of beer for local use so that it can be drawn from wood and not adulterated with any chemical whatsoever in order to make of it a "beer that keeps well," this is the purpose of the National Capital Brewing Company. They do not make beer for shipment, and hence their beer is not treated with any salicylic acid or deleterious substances that are sometimes used with bottled beer to keep it clear and lively.
 
Robert Scott found this match safe metal detecting in the Chesapeake Bay >
 
Pure beer is generally considered a healthful drink. The president of the National Capital Brewing Company told a STAR reporter that any person with a proper interest in the matter might take the keys of the entire establishment at any time, go through it thoroughly, and if he found anything at all used in the making of their beer that was not pure and wholesome the company would give him $1,000.
 
   Beer drawn from the wood is almost certain to be a purer and better quality of beer than the bottled. The National Capital Brewing Company does not bottle. It serves its customers fresh every day with beer that has reached its prime in the immense cooling rooms of the brewery. F. H. Finley & Son, the bottlers, however, have a contract with the company for 20,000 barrels a year of their pale extra beer, and this they bottle and serve to customers in Washington. They get their beer early every morning, as needed, so that people who buy the bottled variety of the National Capital Company's beer are using beer that left the huge casks at the brewery that very day. J. F. Hermann & Son, Wm. H Brinkley and Jas. A Bailey also acts as agent for the company.

    A STAR reporter, accompanied by Mr. Albert Carry, president of the brewing company, recently made a complete inspection of the buildings of the brewery, spending several hours seeing how beer is manufactured from the time it comes in in the form of malt and the raw materials until it leaves the building a clear, cool, foaming beverage inclosed in stout kegs and casks. How much beer there is that leaves the building may be judged when the statement is made that the company uses 10,000 kegs and barrels of all sizes simply in supplying the Washington trade. Nine huge wagons and thirty big horses are used steadily in carrying beer from the brewery to the consumers.

    In truth this is no small business. But what strikes the visitor, be he a casual or an interested one, first and most forcibly of all is the absolute cleanliness and neatness that prevails everywhere. The walls and stairways, for the most part of stone and iron - for the building is fireproof throughout - and the floors are all of iron or concrete and immaculate. On all sides there is hot and cold running water, and indeed the wards of a hospital could scarcely be cleaner or more orderly than the various departments of this brewery. There are no secret chambers into which one may not go. Everything is open and above board, and the fact that the company has no objections to the beer consumer examining every branch of its manufacture is a pretty good sign that they know that everything is honest and fair.

    As a proof of this the company intends giving a public tour Tuesday, July 28, from 8 to 8 p.m., when everything will be in running order and everybody is invited to visit the brewery and inspect it thoroughly from cellar to roof. A handsome luncheon, consisting of all the delicacies of the season, will be spread. Everything will be free, and the National Capital Brewing Company intend to prove that they are as liberal in their hospitality as they are enterprising in their business. It is needless to say that beer will be plentiful and none need to go to bed thirsty Tuesday night.

    Connecting the main building with the engine house is a handsome arched gateway leading into the big court yard, where the wagons stand while they are being loaded. The entrance to the offices is through this gateway. The offices consist of a number of connecting rooms on the main floor in the northwest corner of the building. They are handsomely finished in oak, and are fitted with the most improved office furniture for the convenience of the officers of the company and the corps of bookkeepers and clerks required to transact such an immense volume of business. Opening from the main office and adjoining it is the ice machine room, containing an ice machine with a refrigerating capacity of fifty tons and an eighty-horse-power steam engine, used for grinding and mashing malt and for general hoisting purposes. The ice machine on that hot summer day was almost covered in with ice and snow, and in fact the temperature of the larger part of the brewery is kept down in the neighborhood of freezing point all the time. On the second floor is an immense refrigerating room, and separated from it by an iron door is a room for cleaning and automatically weighing malt, and arranged on the principle of a grain elevator is a store room for malt with a capacity of 20,000 tons.  On the third floor is a great copper kettle holding 300 barrels of new boiling beer. The fourth floor is used for hot and cold water tanks and above is a tank for fire purposes. After boiling in the kettle for seven hours the beer is pumped up, strained and left to cool in a big tank under the roof, where a cool current of air blows constantly. To the rear and on the fourth floor is a big store room and a patent cooler. The beer from the tanks above runs down over coils and is cooled to 40 degrees. This and the rooms below are all 76x94 feet and feel like a cold day in midwinter. On the floor below is the fermenting room, and here the beer stays for two weeks in sixty-five tubs, each holding seventy barrels.

    After the beer is through fermenting it is piped down below into huge vats, each of a 240-barrel capacity, and here it stays in the rest casks for three or four months, beer four months old being about the best. On the floor below a little new beer is added to give the necessary foam, and after being given about three weeks to clarify it is sent by air pressure into the filling room, where it is run into barrels and kegs ready to be loaded onto the wagons. In neighboring rooms a dozen men are busy all the time cleaning, washing and scouring the kegs so there is no chance for any impurities to mar the flavor of the Golden Eagle and the Capuciner beers.

 
JAMES H. HOLMES STEAM BOTTLING WORKS    ~   AUBURN NEW YORK





















HERE IS ANOTHER ADDITION TOD MANAGED TO FIND ON MY BEHALF, A RARE COLOR YELLOW/OLIVE  JAMES H. HOLMES FROM AUBURN NEW YORK AND PRODUCED BY THE CLYDE GLASS WORKS IN CLYDE N.Y. YOU JUST CAN'T GET BETTER COLOR THAN THIS IN THIS BOTTLE.

 

ON THE RIGHT IS THE ORIGINAL BUILDING FOR JAMES H. HOLMES BOTTLING OPERATION IN AUBURN NEW YORK

BELOW IS PICTURE OF MR. HOLMES AND SOME MORE INFORMATION ON HIS BOTTLING BUSINESS AND ALSO THE CLYDE GLASSWORKS


JAMES H. HOLMES AMONG THE MODEL BOTTLING ESTABLISHMENTS ,OWNED BY AND MANAGED BY JAMES HOLMES FROM AUBURN NEW YORK TAKES RANK WITH THE BEST. FOR MANY YEARS MR. HOLMES HAS LABORED TOO BRING HIS BOTTLING PLANT AND SURROUNDINGS UP TOO A HIGH NOTCH OF PERFECTION.THOSE WHO ARE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TOO VISIT HIS PREMISES WILL BEAR WITNESS TO THE NEAT AND ORDERLY ARRANGEMENT OF EVERYTHING IN OFFICES,BARNS AND FACTORY AS WELL AS STORAGE BUILDINGS. THE ATTACHED VIEW OF THE STEAM BOTTLING PLANT IN AUBURN THE PLANT IS LOCATED AT 38-40 CHAPEL STREET AND IS 31 X 100 FEET WITH THREE STORIES. A STRICT DISCIPLINARIAN, "JIMMIE HOLMES IS INDEED A CORKER !"

Clyde Glass Works, Clyde, NY, ca. 1870-1882

 

 The Clyde Glass Works, owned by Messrs. Southwick and Reed, forms another important feature in the manufacturing interests of this busy village. This Company are engaged in the manufacture of bottles and window glass, each comprising different and separate departments. The composition used for each is the same, though the process of making is entirely dissimilar. It is put into large crucibles—made of German clay, which are arranged in the furnaces—every night, and worked out the following day. The crucibles are usually capable of holding 1000 Ibs each. The glass is taken from the furnaces on pipes about four feet in length. The first process by which bottles are made is called marbling, being rolled on a marble slab, after which they are put into molds of whatever shape and size required, and blown into shape. The molds are constructed to work like a spring clamp, being operated entirely by the foot. The bottles are taken from the molds and broken from the blow pipe, when they are finished, or the rim put on, by applying glass from the crucibles. They are now placed in large annealing ovens, for tempering, where they remain about thirty-six hours, and are then taken to the packing room, where they are packed and stored ready for market.

In the window glass factory the process is similar until after it is taken from the crucibles, when the mold is now dispensed with. It is blown into large cylindrical tubes about four feet long, and eight or ten inches in diameter. This is a very difficult branch of the business, and requires much practice to become proficient, as the workmen are governed entirely by the eye, in making a perfectly uniform tube. They are laid upon racks to cool, after which they are cut down the centre, and placed in a revolving carriage, or horizontal bed of clay, in a heated oven, where they remain a sufficient length of time to flatten out in sheets. They .are again cooled, and removed to the cutting room, where they are cut into the required size, after which they are counted and packed, and are then ready to be shipped to market. The process is a simple, yet very beautiful one.


CLYDE GLASS WORKS SOLD.1916

The Rochester, N. Y.. "Chronicle," issue of January 20, reports as follows the passing of a glass factory at Clyde, N. Y., which for almost a century was one of the main stand-bys of the town:

"The Clyde Glass Works, a once prominent enterprise, that for the past 89 years has given employment to hundreds of Clyde citizens, was sold this morning by Edson W. Hamn, of Lyons, as referee, on a mortgage foreclosure to S. Emory Budd, of Newark, for $5,200. This property was at one time valued at $30,000, on which there is an incumbrance of $2,900.

"The Clyde Glass Works has quite a history. About the year 1820 William S. DcZeng purchased the land where the glass works is now located and with James R. Rees founded the present gla^s works in 1827.

"It was then simply a window glass factory and the corner stone was laid March 27, 1828. under the superintendence of Major Frederick A. DeZeng. From 1828 to 1864 the window glass factory alone was run.

"In 1864 the bottle factory was started, the firm being Southwick & Woods, then Southwick & Reed. Afterwards both factories were under the management of Southwick. Reed & Co. On July 24. 1873. the establishment was burned, but was at once rebuilt. In 1878 the buildings underwent repairs and the old corner stone was replaced by a new one August 10th.

"In 1880 Mr. Reed retired and the firm became Ely Sons & Hoyt. After the death of Mr. Hoyt the name was changed to the Clyde Glass Works.

"About a year and a half ago work was discontinued with eighty tons of glass in the tanks, and-since that time every effort has been made by the stockholders to dispose of the business. By the sale today a large number of business men and factory workmen have lost hundreds of dollars which they had invested in bonds. Mr. Budd was unable to state what disposition would be made of the plant."

JOSEPH GAHM BOTTLING ,BOSTON MASS.~ ROBERT H. GRAUPNER HARRISBURG,PA.

ONE OF MY FAVORITE  BLOBTOPS THAT CAME FROM THE BALTIMORE SHOW,WHAT A BOTTLE..., THIS ONE HAS IT ALL, MUG BASE, CRISP EMBOSSING (EVEN THOUGH I STILL HAVE NOT GOT IT TO PICTURE RIGHT) MUG PICTURE ,DEAD MINT,AMAZING COLOR AND SPARKLING CLEAN. IT IS BRILLIANT GREEN WITH A BRIGHT YELLOW TONES IN THE SUN, THESE BOTTLES COME IN A FEW COLOR VARIANTS..BUT NEVER SEEN THIS COLOR IN 30 + YRS. OF COLLECTING.ON THE RIGHT IS ONE THAT MY FRIEND TOD JUST TRADED TO ME, ROBERT H. GRAUPNER BREWERY  HARRISBURG,PA.

 

JOSEPH GAHM ~ MILWAUKEE LAGER BEER

GAHM, JOSEPH, is a native of Germany, born in Mergentheim, Wurtemberg, in 1835. After attending the schools of his native town from his sixth to his fourteenth year, he was apprenticed for three years to learn the tailoring trade, during which period he also received instruction in music, having developed quite a talent in that direction. In 1854, when but eighteen years of age, he decided to come to America, and accordingly sailed for New York, coming from that city direct to Boston, where his brother was then residing. For five years he worked at his trade here in Boston, gave music lessons, and played different instruments in several musical organizations. In 1856 he became a member of the Navy Yard Band, and remained with that organization until 1862, engaging at the same time in business. First he established a tailoring establishment in Charlestown, and then, abandoning that enterprise, opened a restaurant. The latter prospered, and in 1865, removing to larger quarters, he added a billiard hall. Desiring a larger field, in 1878 he decided to move to Boston proper, and selling out his interests in Charlestown he established himself at Nos. 83 and 85 State street. Here he opened one of the best-equipped restaurants in the city, and his patrons from the start were leading down-town merchants, bankers, and brokers. It was not long before he was compelled to occupy the entire building in order to accommodate his increasing trade. In 1872 Mr. Gahm took the agency for all New England for the Joseph Schlitz Brewing Company of Milwaukee, and three years after his removal to State street this business had so increased that he was obliged to transfer his bottling works back to Charlestown,where he erected a large building for them. In 1878 he decided to give all his time and attention to this agency and to bring all the departments of the business under one roof in Boston; accordingly he began the erection of a large five-story brick business block on the corner of Hartford and Purchase streets, and upon its completion the following year he retired from the restaurant business and removed his beer business to the new building. Mr. Gahm has confined his operations to his one line of business, his only other investments having been made in real estate, in which he has also met with success. Since 1864 Mr. Gahm has been a member of the Masonic fraternity, and to-day is a thirty-second degree Mason, a Knight Templar and a member of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of various other organizations of a social and benevolent nature. Mr. Gahm was married in Boston, in 1856, to Barbara Hoartel, who was also a native of Wurtemberg, Germany; they have had six children, four of whom are living. All have enjoyed the best of educational advantages offered by the Boston schools; have also been given good musical instruction, and have taken a course in Bryant & Stratton's business college. Mr. Gahm's winter residence is at No. 31 Monument square, Charlestown district, and his summer residence at Winthrop Island.

JOSEPH. GAHM, NEW ENGLAND AGENT FOR JOSEPH SCHLITZ BREWING CO.,MILWAUKEE  & ARNOLD & CO. S OGDENSBURG, N. Y., INDIA PALE ALES AND PORTER.

Bottler of Bass' English Ale, Guinness's Stout, Imported Kaiser, Culmbach and Pilsner Beers; Direct Importer of Wines and Liquors ; Mineral Water, etc. Depot and Office, 125 Purchase Street (Cor. Hartford) Boston. Telephone No. 954

 

ROBERT H. GRAUPNER BREWERY HARRISBURG,PA.

 Koenig & Brother started their Centennial Brewery in Harrisburg in 1875. Two years later they sold it to Christian Dressler, who operated the plant for eighteen years. In 1893 it was sold to Robert H. Graupner, who formed a stock company two years later and built a large modern brewery which operated as the Harrisburg Consumers Brewing and Bottling Company. Mr. Graupner had learned the brewing trade in Saxony before coming to America in 1883, and by working in breweries in Philadelphia and Lancaster for the next ten years. The brewery became known as Graupners in 1903. It survived Prohibition and remained in business until 1951


Koenig & Bro.     Harrisburg, PA     1875 - 1877
Christian A. Dressel, Centennial Brewery     Harrisburg, PA     1877 - 1893
Graupner & Bauer     Harrisburg, PA     1893 - 1893
Robert A. Graupner, Centennial Brewery     Harrisburg, PA     1893 - 1895
Harrisburg Consumers Brewing and Bottling     Harrisburg, PA     1895 - 1903
Robert H. Graupner Brewery     Harrisburg, PA     1903 - 1905
Estate of Robert H. Graupner     Harrisburg, PA     1905 - 1910
Robert H. Graupner's Brewery     Harrisburg, PA     1910 - 1911
Graupner's Brewery     Harrisburg, PA     1911 - 1920
Mary L. Graupner Est.     Harrisburg, PA     ?? - 1933
Robert H. Graupner - aka Robert H. Graupner's Brewery     Harrisburg, PA     1933 - 1935
Robert H. Graupner, Inc.     Harrisburg, PA     1935 - 1951 (Trayman.net)

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QUANDT BREWING COMPANY / A & A QUANDT  ~ TROY NEW YORK

HERE ARE FOUR VARIANTS OF THE QUANDT BOTTLES FROM TROY NEW YORK, THE A & A QUANDT IS PRETTY HARD TO FIND BUT THE EMERALD GREEN SWIRL BASE HAS HIT THE RARE LIST AND PRICES HAVE SOARED. I AM REAL GLAD TOO HAVE THESE. THE EMERALD AND A & A I JUST GOT THIS YEAR (2011) AT THE SARATOGA {NATIONAL BOTTLE MUSEUM} SHOW. I ALSO HAVE A CLEAR VARIANT SMOOTH SIDE WITH INDIAN...JUST GOTTA DIG IT OUT.

 

 

 

Adam and Andrew Quandt from Troy NY. The family came from Germany in the 1850 era. built and ran a Brewery on River Street in Troy called Quandt Brewing Company.

  

Their father's name was William. Mother was Margaret Leo Kirchner Troy, NY 1859 - 1877
Andrew & Adam Quandt Troy, NY 1877 - 1884
Quandt Brewing Co. Troy, NY 1884 - 1920
Quandt Brewing Co., Inc. Troy, NY 1933 - 1942

QUANDT BREWING WAS IN BANKRUPTCY IN 1941 AND ALL FIXTURES ECT WERE AUCTIONED OFF.

 

 Quandt Brewing Company (Adam Quandt, president, and H. W. Vossmerbaumer, secretary, 1888), lager beer, Nos. 846-852 River Street. (Leo Kirchner, 1869.)

 

TWO OTHER VARIANTS OF THE QUANDT BREWING BOTTLES (A & A QUANDT IS PRETTY RARE) AND WE HAVE HEARD THERE IS AN AMBER OUT THERE....THAT WOULD BE A VERY VALUABLE BOTTLE

 

 

 

 

 

C.BERRY & CO., BOSTON & FITZGERALD BROS.,TROY N.Y.

CASPER BERRY & CO. BLOWN IN MOLD WITH REGISTERED EMBOSSED AT BASE, LATCH DOWN CROWN STYLE LID, THIS BOTTLE LANDS RIGHT BETWEEN BLOB AND CROWN TOP ABM, GREAT COLOR. ON RIGHT FITZGERALD BROS. BREWING CO. TROY N.Y.

 

84-88 Leverett and 2-10 AshlandC. BERRY & CO.
Boston, MA.
1894-1916   Est. 1878.
Casper Berry & Co., Importers, Agents, and Wholesale Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Wines and Liquors.

The company used the brand names:
"2 Always In Front", "Ashland Club", "Berry's Diamond Wedding", "Diamond Wedding", "Intervale", "Kurnwood", "Old Berrywood", and "Red Arrow."

 

The pictured Kork-N-Seal caps are typical in shape and function but intended to be used on crown finish beer bottles.  These particular caps were not the original cap for the bottled product, but were instead given out as a promotional item for later resealing.  It is unlikely that these caps would hold carbonation indefinitely like a crown cap but were adequate for short term use. 


FITZGERALD BROTHERS BREWING ~ 495-511 RIVER STREET,TROY NEW YORK
JAMES LUNDY,NORTH RIVER BREWERY ~ 1852-1853  LUNDY AND INGRAM ~ 1853-1855

LUNDY AND KENNEDY ~ 1855-1857   LUNDY-DUNN & COMPANY ~ 1857-1859
DUNN AND KENNEDY ~ 1859-1866  FITZGERALD BROTHERS ~ 1866-1899
FITZGERALD BROTHERS BREWING COMPANY ~ 1899-1920 {SHUT DOWN IN 1920,OPENED IN 1933 UNTIL ABOUT 1966}

JOHN STANTON BREWING & MALTING CO. ~ TROY NEW YORK

ON THE LEFT IS A VERY RARE VARIANT OF JOHN STANTON BREWING IN GREEN AND WITH LADIES LEG NECK AND EMBOSSED ON BASE "C.E. VANDERCOOK, TROY NEW YORK. VANDERCOOK WAS A CIGAR BOX MANUFACTUER IN THE LATTER PART OF THE 1800'S IN TROY AND BEST I CAN FIND WENT INTO THE BOTTLE PRODUCING BUSINESS ABOUT THE TURN OF THE CENTURY, PROBABLY BECAUSE SOMEONE KEPT SETTING FIRES TO HIS BOX PLANT (SEE ARTICLE BELOW)...NICE, ON THE RIGHT MY STRAIGHT NECK VERY SCARCE STANTON BREWING ~ TROY N.Y. IN NICE EMERALD GREEN

 

JOHN STANTON BREWING & MALTING CO.,TROY NEW YORK. Established 1817. Incorporated 1895. John Stanton, pres't & treas.; Wm. P. Stanton, vice Pres't & Mgr.; Edmond F. Stanton, secy. Brewers & bottlers of ales, porter and lager beer. Absolutely the best ever brewed

PRETTY INTERESTING CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN BREWERS AND SUPPLIER THAT IS AGAINST BREWERS ECT.

 

I Robert A. Keasbey Co.. heat and cold insulating materials. Headquarters for magnesia, asbestos and brine pipe coverings, asbestos products, ntc., too North Moore St.. New York City.] Apuii. 12, 1910. The John Stanton Brewing Co., Troy, New York. Gentlemen : We acknowledge yours of April 8th. and have received a visit from Mr. Parker, connected with the Manufacturers' & Dealers' League. We have explained to him our position, namely: That we believe that local option, giving to every community the privilege to vote as to whether saloons shall or shall not be instituted in their locality, is a prerogative of the American people and part of the Constitution, and therefore it has our general good wishes. We regret very much that we cannot think with you or have you think with us. Very truly yours. Robert A. Keasbey Co. Robert A. Keasbey. Pre». d Gen'l Mgr. RAK/W [The John Stanton Brewing and Malting Co. Established 1817. Incorporated 1895. John Stanton, pres't & treas.; Wm. P. Stanton, vice Pres't & Mgr.; Edmond F. Stanton, secy. Brewers & bottlers of ales, porter and lager beer. Absolutely the best ever brewed. Supreme brand?Jupiter.] Answered Apr. 14, 1910. F. F. F. 1428-1448 Fifth Avenue. Troy, N.Y., April 13th, 1910. Mr. Hugh F. Fox, Secty., United States Brewers Assn., 109 E. 115th Street, New York, N. Y.

 Dear Sir: At the suggestion of Manufacturers and Dealers League, we recently addressed a stereotyped letter to a number of individuals and firms with whom we have done business, in an effort to have them join the League, the objects of which you, are no doubt familiar with. The enclosed copy of reply we received from the Robert A. Keasbey Company, and explains itself. We, in the past, have done a great deal of business with this concern, as no doubt many other brewers, hotel keepers and manufacturing firms allied with the trade have done, and many of whom will undoubtedly continue to do so in the future, unless the attitude of this firm toward our interests becomes known to them. Should you deem it wise to send out a copy of this letter, we would request that the name of the addressee be withheld. Yours very truly, The John Stanton Brewing Company. Wm. P. Stanton, Mgr. WPS-E. April 14, 1910. Mr. William Stanton. ., Stanton Brewing & Malting Co., Troy, New York. 

Dear Sir: I have your favor of the 13th, and thank you for calling our attention to the attitude of the Robert A. Keasbey Company. Their letter to you is certainly frank and manly, and I must express a certain admiration for their honesty, when It would have been so easy to evade the tone. We are about to publish a study of local option, and my judgment would be to wait until this is out, and then submit it to the Keasbey Company, and see if we cannot convert them, before doing anything that would put them permanently in opposition to us. I have notified Mr. Savage of the Manufacturers & Dealers League accordingly. Yours very truly, Secretary. HFF/D June 1st, 1910. The John Stanton Brg. & Malting Co. 11,28 Fifth Ave., Troy, N. Y.

Dear Sirs :?This is with reference to your letter of April 13th, regarding your correspondence with the Robert A. Keasbey Company, and I enclose for your information, copy of my letter to this concern, and will advise you of the developments. Yours very truly, Secretary. HFF/D Enc. (This letter in not in the files.) [Orange County Brewery, Mlddletown, N. Y. The king of all beers, the cream of all ales. Wuerzburger & IMlsener beers, sparkling & cream ales and porter.] Jul 14 1914. The U S Brewers Assoiation 50 union Sq New York City Gentlemen : To day a Robert A Keasbey agent called to solicit orders on Pipe Covering etc. We did not hesitate to tell the agent that we would not give Keasbey an order, as Keasbey would use the money to fight our business. We had to order the agent out, which he disliked very much. Keasbey received a number of orders from us up to two or three years ago, when we were informed that he opposed the Liquor business. This agent said that the Keasbey Co are doing a lot of work for Obermeyer & Liebman at Brooklyn N. Y. If this be the case would it be proper for you to acquaint Obermeyer and Leibman of the facts Robert A Keasbey & Co. are located at 100 North Moore St N Y City We are positive that Kensby made some remarks or donated to the cause of Prohibition. Of course we have no paper to show this to be true, however we refused to give Keasbey any more orders after we read of his doings against the business. The Robert A Keasby Co advertise In the Brewers Journal. Would it be wise to ascertain from the Keasby Co how they stand on the Liquor question, as they manufacture material used in Breweries and we are opposed to support any one that is against us. If the Brewer's support any firm or person that is against us we would be paying money to others to put us out of business, in fact it would be our own money putting us out of business, fiive this matter prompt attention. Yours truly Orange County Brewery Chas C Young Midriletoicn, A'. Y. [New York State Brewers' Association, 109-111 East 15th Street, New York.] July 16. 1914. Mr. Hugh F. Pox, Secretary, 50 Union Square, New York City, New York. My Dear Mk. Fox : Mr. Parker, of the Manufacturers' & Dealers' League, informs me that Robert H. Keasbey & Company of 100 North Moore Street are decidedly hostile to our interests. Yours very truly, Sam. S. Brewer. McL. SSB/McL. [Office copy, Please return this copy to the file.]

 

STANTON BREWERY ~ TROY N.Y.
RARE ~ TRENTON BREWING COMPANY ,TRENTON N.J.  ~ JOHN GRAF, MILWAUKEE WIS.

LEFT, A RARE TRENTON BREWING CO. WITH EMBOSSED TIGERS HEAD ON FRONT...WHAT A GREAT BOTTLE 

ON THE RIGHT IS A JOHN GRAF 8 SIDED WITH STOPPER FROM MILWAUKEE,WIS.

 PEOPLE'S BREWING CO.?Inc. April 28, 1899, in N. J.; consolidation of the following companies located at Trenton, N. J.; Trenton Brewing Co., Franz Hill's Brewery, Consumers' Brewing Co., and Hygeia Ice Co.

 THE TRAY  IS TRENTON BREWING AFTER THE CONSOLIDATION TOOK PLACE.


JOSEPH S PEDERSON ~ NEW YORK 

HERE IS ONE I JUST PICKED UP, THE COLOR SCREAMED AT ME...MAY HAVE TO START A COLOR RUN OF THESE. THIS IS THE COLOR TO START WITH FOR SURE.

c.1860-1885. They come in some interesting & scarce color variations. The JSP monogram stands for: "Joseph S. Pederson" - out of New York City, sole agent in the U.S. The bottle contained "Johann Hoff's Malt Extract (Beer of Health), a healing remedy for the stomach, dyspepsia, etc., Gold Medal winning medicinal product in London 1862."

 
 TRENTON BREWING COMPANY, TRENTON NEW JERSEY

Colonel Anthony R. Kuser, born May 12, 1862, in Newark, New Jersey. He was also educated in the parochial schools of his native city and the public school of Hamilton township. He studied engineering and became interested in various enterprises in Trenton and elsewhere. He organized the Trenton Hygeia Ice Company, the Trenton Brewery Company, and was instrumental in consolidating all the gas and electric companies of the city. It was his suggestion that the price of gas should be reduced from one dollar and fifty cents to one dollar, and it was due to his efforts that this measure was adopted. He, with his twin brother, John L. Kuser, was the leading spirit in the purchase of the Trenton Street Railway Company. He is president of the South Jersey Gas and Electric Lighting Company, and it was he who originated the idea of manufacturing coke at Camden, and of piping the gas to Trenton, New Jersey. This is the longest piping line of its kind in the world. So satisfactory have been the results of this enterprise that the Public Service are now piping the same gas to North Jersev. Colonel Kuser was one of the organizers of Inter-State Fair. He has served on the board of railroad assessors, was nominated for state senator from Mercer county, but refused to accept. He has served on the staffs of Governors Abbott, Wertz and Tohn W. Griggs. He married a Miss Dryden, daughter of United States Senator John F. Dryden, and they have one child, John Dryden Kuser.

Trade Names for the brewery at Lalor & 1053 Lamberton Streets, Trenton, NJ:     Col. A. R. Kuser 1891-1892

Trenton Brewing Co. 1892-1899     Peoples Brewing Co., Aka: Trenton Brewing Co. 1899-1932     Peoples Brewing Co. of Trenton 1932-1950

Metropolis Brewery of New Jersey, Inc. 1950-1967    Aka: Banner Brewing Co. 1956-1957    Aka: Class A Brewing Co. 1961-1965

Aka: Trenton Brewing Co. 1961-1965   Aka: Gilt Edge Brewing Co. 1961-1967     Aka: Hornell Brewery Co. 1961-1966
Aka: Old Bohemian Brewing Co. 1962-1964   Aka: P. B. Brewing Co. 1962-1964    Aka: Rialto Brewing Co. 1955-1963
Aka: Tudor Brewing Co. 1955-1963

Champale, Inc. 1967-1987    Aka: Black Horse Brewery of New Jersey 1973-1987     Aka: Colony House Brewing Co, 1967-1972
Aka: Wilco Brewing Co. 1967-1972   Aka: Champ Brewing Co. 1967-1972

 

JOHN GRAF

The origins of Grandpa Graf's root beer dates back to 1873, where John Graf first brewed the root beer on S. 41st St. and W. Greenfield Ave. in West Milwaukee. Graf then formed his own company, being Graf Beverages, that produced a wide variety of soft drinks. Graf continued to brew soft drinks, but it is his root beer that is remembered the most. John Graf's image is still on the can of root beer, in his memory of creating the hallowed beverage. His legacy was passed onto his son after his death in 1930, where his daughter (Sylvia Graf) took presidency of the company. Once she died in 1963, Lawrie O. Graf. Lawrie Graf was well known for his creative engineering skills and his education in chemistry from his study at Marquette University, and helped the company come to a national status. It was said that Graf's beverages were being shipped by the train full all across the country. The company hit national notice quickly. Lawrie Graf continued to run the company until 1968, where he sold the company to P & V Atlas Industrial Center. Lawrie retired, and died in 1998, at the age of 84, ending the Graf legacy.

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  G.W.HOXIE, ALBANY         ~          W. H. HUTCHINSON,CHICAGO

        A RARE  G.W. HOXIE PREMIUM BEER IN A NICE TEAL COLOR, THIS IS SAID TO BE ONE OF THE VERY FIRST EMBOSSED BEER BOTTLES. ALBANY NEW YORK  ~ COBALT WILLIAM H. HUTCHINSON,CHICAGO BLOB,NICE COLOR

G.W. HOXIE PREMIUM BEER, ALBANY NEW YORK, BELOW IS SOME INFORMATION ON THE MAN. I AM SEARCHING OUT MORE AND WILL ADD ASAP, MAY TAKE ANOTHER TRIP TO ALBANY LIBRARY.

 Stevens and Mandeville bought out the business of G.W. Hoxsie in 1873. Hoxie had been one of the most prolific advertisers of his famous beer and bottling business. Since Hoxsie had been so widely advertised, S&M wisely kept his eye-catching monogram on their own bottles...it is the letters of HOXIE intertwined after dropping the first H and last E.

 

As we turn into Chatham Street we recall that here until 1818 there was only a narrow lane along the old burying ground on our left. On the northeast corner of the bank lawn there stood in '64 the Grocery store of A. V. D. Witbeck, formerly G. W. Hoxie's. It is now the tenant house near the Bottling works.

 

"OVERSEER OF THE POOR G.W. HOXIE AGREED WITH THE ACTMS. IN NOVEMBER 1875 HE ASKED ALBANY'S COMMON COUNCIL TO INSTITUTE A PUBLIC WORKS PROGRAM IN PLACE OF HOME RELIEF. HOXIE BELIEVED THAT RELIEF THROUGH WORK ON PUBLIC PROJECTS WOULD MAKE IT RECIPIENTS INDEPENDENT AND SAVE THEM FROM STIGMA WHICH THEY CONSIDER ATTACHES IF THEY SHOULD ACCEPT MONEY OR FUEL WITHOUT GIVING AN EQUIVALENT. PARTY, IN RESPONSE TO HOXIE DECIDED AT IT'S FIRST SESSION IN JANUARY 1876 TO HAVE CONSTRUCTION START IMMEDIATELY ON A RESEVOIR ALREADY AUTHORIZED FOR ALBANY'S NEW WATER SYSTEM. IT WAS UNUSUAL TO CARRY OUT CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN WINTER BUT THE COUNCIL WANTED TO PROVIDE WORK FOR MANY SUFFERING WORKERS WITHOUT DELAY. A WEEK LATER THEY AUTHORIZED WORK ON THE NEW PARK BLVD. AND PASSED A 37'000 BOND ISSUE." 

 

W. H. Hutchinson & Son

 William Henry Hutchinson was born in 1812 to Joseph and Sarah Hutchinson of Lebanon, Connecticut.  During the 1830s he lived in Williamsburg, New York where he established and operated a rooming house known as the Williamsburg Inn. 

  In 1840 he headed west to Chicago, Illinois and spent the next several years working at odd jobs. W. H. Hutchinson opened a small Chicago bottling plant in a dwelling on West Randolph, between Clinton and Jefferson Streets, in 1848.  ?Hutchinson & Company?s? first bottled products included spruce and lemon beers, cider, soda, and mineral water.

  Oak barrels full of fresh water for carbonating were hauled by wagon from Lake Michigan.  The beers and cider were put up in 10 and 12 sided stoneware bottles with brown glazing.  They have HUTCHINSON & CO.  and HUTCHINSON & CO. NO. 1 debossed into their sides, and are marked HUTCHINSON?S / LEMON BEER and HUTCHINSON?S / SPRUCE BEER on their shoulders.  Sodas and mineral waters were bottled in cobalt blue, long-neck, blob top, iron-pontiled bottles embossed HUTCHINSON & CO. / CELEBRATED / MINERAL / WATER / CHICAGO or HUTCHINSON & CO. / CELEBRATED / MINERAL WATER / CHICAGO.  These bottles are believed to have been blown by William McCully & Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

    In 1851 operations were moved to the corner of Randolph and Peoria Streets.  The Hutchinson & Company name was changed to ?W. H. Hutchinson & Company? in 1855 and their new cobalt blue soda bottles were embossed W.H.H. / CHICAGO.  These newer bottles were similar to the earlier examples, but have smooth bases.  Some of them have ?Wm. McC & Co.? maker?s marks on the back heel, confirming their manufacture by McCully.  Variants have been found with both round and 10 panel bases

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FIZTPATRICK & KANE,MECHANIVILLE  ~  FITZGERALD BROS. TROY

 MY RECENTLY DUG VERY RARE FITZPATRICK & KANE,MECHANICVILLE N.Y. PONY (1OF 3 KNOWN) ALSO RECENT DIG,FITZTGERALD BROS. TROY N.Y. PONY,PRETTY SCARCE AS WELL

I HAVE OVER 150 BLOBS THAT I STILL HAVE TO GO THROUGH SO I WILL BE ADDING AS I AM ALSO GETTING MORE ALL THE TIME,SO CHECK BACK OFTEN. THANKS

FITZPATRICK & KANE

Conway Brothers & Kane (Daniel E. and Henry A. Conway, and Nicholas T. Kane, 1883), ale and porter, Nos. 124-146 North Fourth Street.Troy New York

 

NICHOLAS KANE HAD A SHORT PARTNERSHIP WITH FITZPATRICK FROM MECHANICVILLE AT ABOUT THE SAME TIME AS HE WAS IN BUSINESS WITH THE CONWAY BROTHERS, 1880'S AREA. BEST I CAN TELL THIS WAS A 1 TO 2 YEAR VENTURE, EXPLAINING WHY THIS BOTTLE IS SO HARD TO FIND.

 

D.G. YUENGLING  JR.  BREW CO.'S ~ SARATOGA BRANCH ~ YUENGLING BREWING CO. ~ D.G. YUENGLING JR. RIVERSIDE NY

HERE ARE TWO I HAVE BEEN LOOKING FOR FOR QUITE SOME TIME D.G. YUENGLING JR. FROM SARATOGA BRANCH & RIVERSIDE N.Y. WITH PROP. NAME..BOTH ARE RARE. I ALSO HAVE 2 PONY VARIANTS FROM  SARATOGA (ONE WITH "JR" AND ONE WITHOUT) SEE BELOW AND THE SARATOGA BRANCH HUTCH ABOVE,ALL ARE VERY HARD TO FIND NOWADAYS.

D.G. YUENGLING JR OPENED A BREWERY IN VIRGINIA AND LATER IN NEW YORK CITY, RIVERSIDE & SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y. THERE IS SOME CONFUSION IF THE SARATOGA BRANCH WAS ACTUALLY A BREWERY OR A BOTTLING OPERATION.

BE SURE TO CHECKOUT MY D.G. YUENGLING PAGE FOR MORE INFORMATION,THANKS


The German brewer David Gottlob Jüngling immigrated to the United States in 1823 from Aldingen, a suburb of Stuttgart, in the Kingdom of Württemberg. He anglicized his surname from Jüngling to Yuengling and began the "Eagle Brewery" on Center Street in Pottsville in 1829. His eldest son, David, Jr., left the Eagle Brewery to establish the James River Steam Brewery along the James River in Richmond, Virginia.The first brewery burned down in an 1831 fire and the company relocated to W. Mahantongo Street at 5th Street, its current location.[6] The Eagle Brewery changed its name to "D. G. Yuengling and Son" in 1873 after Frederick Yuengling joined his father David in running the company. Although the company's name changed, the bald eagle remained the company's emblem. During the late 19th century, breweries were also opened in Saratoga, New York City, and Trail, British Columbia, although they were eventually merged with the Pottsville plant.
 
Frank Yuengling began heading the company in 1899 after his father Frederick died.[3] During the Prohibition era, Yuengling survived by producing "near beers" (beverages with a 0.5% alcohol content) called "Yuengling Special", "Yuengling Por-Tor", and "Yuengling Juvo". The company also ran a dairy which produced ice cream and opened dance halls
in Philadelphia and New York City.After the 18th Amendment was repealed in 1933, Yuengling sent a truckload of "Winner Beer" to President Franklin D. Roosevelt in appreciation, which arrived the day the amendment was repealed ? particularly notable since Yuengling beer takes almost three weeks to brew and age.Richard L. Yuengling and F. Dohrman Yuengling succeeded Frank Yuengling after their father's death in 1963.
 
Yuengling suffered from the rise of large commercial breweries during the 1970s. It was able to survive owing to demand from its customer base in Schuylkill County. The company also experienced an increase of sales after a renewed interest in history owing to the United States Bicentennial in 1976.Yuengling bought the rights to use the Mount Carbon (Bavarian Premium Beer) name and label when Mount Carbon Brewery went out of business in 1977. Yuengling initially brewed beer at Mount Carbon but eventually abandoned it. The dairy remained in business until 1981, but its vacant building sits across Mahantongo Street from Yuengling's 1831 brewery and still carries Yuengling signage to this day.
 In 1985, the Yuengling brewery was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the oldest brewery in the United States.It was also so listed in the Pennsylvania Inventory of Historic Places at some unspecified date. (The company's website mentions only a vague national and state registration in 1976).Yuengling has been a registered trademark since 1995.The Pottsville brewery was featured on an episode of The History Channel's American Eats.
 
Richard L. ("Dick") Yuengling, Jr. took over as the 5th-generation company president in 1985. In 1987 the brewery reintroduced a lager they had not made in decades to take advantage of a spike in heavier-style beers. Since this time, Yuengling Lager has become its flagship brand, accounting for 80% of production and much of its rapid growth. In the early 1990s, demand throughout Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware outstripped the existing brewery's abilities. In 1999, they increased their manufacturing capacity by purchasing a Stroh Brewery Company plant in Tampa, Florida, hiring the former Stroh employees, and began working with a trade union for the first time.In 2000, the company built a third brewery in Pennsylvania, in Port Carbon in Schuylkill County near Pottsville. With production at the Port Carbon, Tampa, and original Pottsville plants, the company has been able to expand throughout the East Coast.  As of 2009, Yuengling is a moderately priced beer popular northward through New York, westward until Ohio, and southward through South Carolina. The Tampa brewery supplies the Florida Gulf Coast, the Florida Keys, Central Florida, North Florida, the Florida Panhandle as well as Alabama and Tennessee.The brewery uses corn from Minnesota and hops from Washington as ingredients in its products.  Yuengling began distribution in the state of Georgia on October 27, 2008, and in May 2009 in West Virginia.
 
Richard Yuengling only has daughters, so the family name itself will discontinue with him. However, his daughters are being groomed to continue the Yuengling tradition as the 6th generation of the brewing family. According to a guide of the free tour that the brewery offers at their flagship location, each succeeding owner has bought the company from his father at full market price, and that tradition will carry on with the 6th generation.

 

Yuengling Ice Cream

1921, Frank Yuengling built a dairy to make up for the beer sales lost during Prohibition. The dairy manufactured ice cream for 65 years  "When you think of Yuengling you usually think of beer, more precisely lager. But what most don't know is that ice cream may have helped to save the brewery. During prohibition Yuengling was no longer allowed to make alcoholic beer. They instead made a non-alcoholic near beer, but it may have been the creamery across from the brewery that kept the Yuengling name afloat. The ice cream packages back in those days also contained baseball cards, many of which are quite valuable today, and often difficult to find. The amazing thing is how long they continued to churn out ice cream even after prohibition. The Yuengling creamery continued serving customers in the nearby communities up until 1985 when they closed the creamery for good. " No family member wanted to run it. Here is a link to pictures of the baseball cards that came in the ice cream. BASEBALL CARDS

AMERICAN BREWING CO. ~ BENNETT, PA. ~ RARE GEORGE B. ALLEN ~ ALBANY N.Y.

HERE,  IS MY LATEST GREAT BLOB ADDITION. AMERICAN BREWING COMPANY ~ BENNETT PENNSYLVANIA,A SMALL TOWN THAT HAS SINCE BEEN CONSUMED BY LARGER MUNICIPALITY OF PHILADELPHIA, THIS IS A COMPANY IN BUSINESS UNDER THIS NAME FROM 1897~1920 RANGE AND HAS A BALTIMORE LOOP TOP.GREAT PICTURE BLOB WITH EAGLE,SHIELD AND AMERICAN FLAG.

ON THE RIGHT IS A VERY RARE BEER FROM ALBANY N.Y. ~ GEORGE B. ALLEN AND THE ONLY ONE OF THESE I HAVE TO DATE SEEN. I MANAGED TO PICK THIS ONE UP AT THE 2011 SARATOGA/BOTTLE MUSEUM SHOW, GREAT BOTTLE AND IN MINT CONDITION.

 I ALSO MANAGED TO FIND THIS PICTURE OF A VERY COOL PAPER WEIGHT ADVERTISING THE BREWERY

 

 AMERICAN BREWING CO. BENNETT, PENNSYLVANIA 

Trade Names for the brewery at 1400 North 31st & Master Streets, Philadelphia, PA: 
Morris Perot (NE corner 31st & Master) 1878-1880  Henzler & Flach 1880-1885   Henry Flach, Eagle Brewery 1885-1888
Henry Flach & Sons 1888-1897  American Brewing Co, 1897-1920  Brewery operations shut down by National Prohibition in 1920
Status of the building is unknown.

American Brewing Co., Wm. C. Kammerer, Secretary and Treasurer, Thirty-first and Master.  1916

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JOHN L. GEBHARDT, BOSTON ~ CARL SCHULTZ

                 

 VERY NICE DEEP EMERALD GREEN PUSHUP BASE JOHN L. GEBHARDT BOSTON,MASS,VERY SCARCE BLOB~ ON THE RIGHT IS MY GREEN CARL SCHULTZ, NEW YORK BLOB

THIS IS WHAT I HAVE SO FAR ON THIS RARE EMERALD GREEN JOHN L. GEBHARDT BLOB WITH PUSHUP BASE

 

1st dam MARY F by ROLAND, 4088.Dam of Mary C, 2:16^. Record 2:28. Sire of Yates, 2:23%; Nelly May, 2:24^; Maggie S., 2 -.30, etc. Son of Crown Chief, 4089.Owner's Statement. Mary C. is a chestnut mare with a little white on both hind coronets, white spot on left front heel, and very small star. She is a nice road mare. Stepped a mile in 2:io'/2 over the Readville track in August, 1903. She has a wonderful turn of speed. Can step a quarter in 30 seconds any time when in shape. She has started in five 1 aces this season and got a piece of money in three of them. I am not selling for any fault, but because I have some young stock that I wish to develop. She requires but little rigging at any time, while on a straightaway course she needs only quarter boots. She will make a nice speedway mare.Consignment from John L. Gebhardt, Boston, Mass. No. 660. Yangaza.Trial 2:25, half 1:08#, quarter 33 seconds.
Out of own sister to Bonnibel, 2:17X. Trotter; bred by J. Malcolm Forbes, Boston, Mass. Consigned by J. L. Gebhardt.
Foaled 1898; 15.1J4 hands; bay mare. Standard.

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CARL H. SHULTZ, RARE GREEN BLOB DATED 1868,HEAVIEST BLOB I OWN!!.

CARL H. SCHULTZ, 430-444 1st Ave.. New York, N. Y. Telephone call, 142 Madison Square. The only pure and correct Artificial Mineral Waters sold in New York City to-day.

    When you take a walk in Central Park, don't fall to visit the Mineral Springs Pavilion erected by the late Carl H. Schultz. The Springs offer a rare opportunity of combining a Mineral Water Cure with exercise in the open air. TM- Artificial Mineral Spring Waters served at their proper nlnjs »temperatures. Manufactured only with distilled water artiflcial & chemically pure salts. Prescribed by and used In the mperaturmiue9 ot over :200 leading Physicians in New York.

SHIPMAN, Circuit Judge. The existence in the commune of Vichy, in France, of numerous mineral springs, which have long produced water of high medicinal value, is well known. The water began to be sold as early as 1716, and became popularly known as "Vichy" or "Vichy Water." The republic of France is the owner of nearly all these springs, and by the terms of acts passed in 1853 and 1864 La Compagnie Fermiere de L'Etablissement Thermal de Vichy (hereinafter called the "Company") obtained the concession of the springs owned by the state for terms of years which have not yet expired. This company bottles at Vichy, and sells in France and in other countries, the waters of which it is the lessee, under labels which are its property, and of which the characteristic marks consist in the name "Vichy," and the name of the particular spring, and a woodcut vignette showing the "thermal establishment." In 1853 it began to export its water to this country, and in 1893 its shipments to this country were about 300,000 bottles. In 1896 its entire shipments amounted to nearly 10,000,000 bottles.

The natural waters are exported in their original condition, and are not artificially charged with gas. In 1823 Struve, a German chemist, commenced in Dresden the manufacture of artificial mineral waters, by carefully analyzing the water of the natural mineral springs of Europe, and reproducing them with the same ingredients and the same properties, added from time to time to the scope of his manufacture, and included the imitation of the Vichy water, and his various products became widely known in Europe. In 1862 Carl H. Schultz, the testator of the defendant, began in New York the manufacture and sale of artificial Vichy water in accordance with the standard analysis of the Grand Grille spring by Bauer, an assistant of Struve. This spring was one of those owned by the French republic, and its water was considered to be of especial value. The labels upon the bottles in which the water was sold contained the words: "Vichy (Grand Grille). Carl H. Schultz,"?and also contained the words, "Carl H. Schultz's Vichy (Grand Grille)," and Bauer's analysis. This label was not in any respect an imitation of the company's label. After the commencement of this suit, Schultz changed his label so that it read: "Vichy. Manufactured by Carl H. Schultz,"?and contained the words, "Carl H. Schultz's Vichy, Compounded After Bauer's Analysis." This water has been usually put in siphon bottles, and has been continuously sold in very large quantities by druggists, vendors of soda, saloon keepers, and at hotels.

     In the year 1897 the output was about a million siphons. The bill in this case was filed against Carl H. Schultz on January 23, 1892. He died on May 29, 1897, and thereafter the complainants filed their bill of reviver against Louise Schultz, as executrix of his last will. After December 31, 1892, until his death, his label on each bottle was as follows: "Artificial Vichy. Manufactured from Distilled Water by Carl H. Schultz." In the publications and advertisements of Schultz there is no representation that his water is natural Vichy, but, on the contrary, its artificial character is asserted, and his water has gained a high reputation from its accurate conformity to the analysis of the genuine water. By intelligent purchasers of his Vichy, it was understood to be artificial, and the distinction was well known by physicians, who prescribed one or the other article according to the needs of the patient; and ,while, undoubtedly, the use of the name "Vichy" by Schultz when his water was first introduced into this country diminished the sales of the waters of the complainants, and gave quick notoriety and popularity to the article which he made, it did not confuse in the public mind the identity of the two articles, because the one was a still and the other a sparkling water. The sales of artificial Vichy in this country far exceed those of the natural water. No complaint or remonstrance by the lessees or their agents against the use of the Schultz labels was made prior to the commencement of this suit." 

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A.F. DOBLER BREWING COMPANY   ~     ALBANY, NEW YORK

 

THE ONLY BLOB I HAVE EVER OWNED THAT THE WORD PUCE APPLIED, THIS THING FROM EMBOSSED HAND HOLDING MUG DOWN TO BASE IS BLOOD RED...SWEET!!

 

 

A. F.Dolbler, Lager Beer Brewer, Swan and Elm Streets.? The city of Albany has a number of branches of industry that have made her the important centre she is to-day, and one of the most prominent of these is the brewery interest, which now employs a very large capital and hundreds of hands. One of the finest lager beer breweries in the city is that of Mr. A. F. Dobler, located at the junction of Swan and Elm streets and Myrtle Avenue. This enterprise was inaugurated in 1865, by Mr. John Dobler, who built the present brewery in 1876, and, at his death in 1885, he was succeeded by hi* son, the present proprietor. It is a splendid property located on the most prominent and highest point in the city overlooking the Hudson with splendid views of the Catskills and other mountains. The malt storage house, opposite Washington Park on State Street, fully refiects the paramount importance of the industry represented. The capacity of the brewery is 20,000 barrels with storage capacity for 60,000 bushels of malt in his malt-house, while the preparation for the manufacture is thoroughly complete and extensive, every accessory, no matter how seemingly trivial having been provided to assure a high and perfect standard. The machinery and building plant embraces every invention and appliance known to modern brewing, and improvements and additions are constantly being made through the enterprise of the management. Ample steam power is utilized, and employment is given to thirty-five skilled and experienced hands, and, through his liberality Mr. Dobler has never experienced strikes.

The beer here brewed has secured a wide and increasing popularity with dealers and consumers, as its purity, flavor, and health-giving properties are recognized everywhere as unsurpassed. Only the choicest hops and malt, carefully selected by competent representatives of the house, are used, and in the process of production the full strength and virtue of constituent element is extracted and resolved' into a union that has found unusual favor with connoisseurs. The greatest pains are taken in every detail of the work, the latest and best methods are employed, and such principles applied in thebrewing as long experience and scientific research have commended, and approved. It has ever been the policy of the house to furnish, the best in quality, wholesomeness and general excellence, and the estimation in which its products is held at home and the steady uniform increase of its annual sales, wherever tested, gives conclusive proof that a responsive chord has been struck in the popular heart. In enterprise, liberality, keen appreciation of public expectation and demand, and unswerving allegiance to honor and truth. Mr. Dobler may be fairly said to have earned the respect, the confidence and the patronage of the whole community. His sales already average fifteen thousand barrels per annum, and are steadily increasing each year. Mr. Dobler was born in Germany, is a thoroughly practical brewer, a member of the New York State Brewers' Association, and the First Scientific Station of Brewing. Although the oldest practical L. brewer in this city, he is in the early prime of life, and eminently popular with his host of friends and patrons in this city and vicinity. Some of the most eminent brewing foremen in this country obtained their education at his brewery or when under his management.

Trade Names for the brewery at 25, Albany, NY:    Darius S. Wood (Myrtle Ave, Swan & Elm Streets) 1865-1868     John Dobler 1868-1885      A. F. Dobler 1885-1891

Theo. M. Amsdell 1891-1893    Dobler Brewing Co. Theo K. Amsdell & George C. Hawley 1893-1908     Dobler Brewing Co, 1908-1920      Brewery operations shut down by National Prohibition in 1920

Purchased by Christian Feigenspan Brewing Co 1933

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CHARLES JOLY ,PHILADELPHIA PA. ~ GEORGE BECHTEL, STATEN ISLAND

ANOTHER FAVORITE I WAS ABLE TO GET THANKS AGAIN TO TODS WATCHFUL EYE, MINT CONDITION AND IN A GREAT COLOR, CHARLES JOLY # 9 SOUTH SEVENTH STREET  PHILADELPHIA,PENNSYLVANIA. HE ALSO RAN A STOPPER MANUFACTURING BUSINESS AT THE SAME ADDRESS AS LISTED BELOW.

ON THE RIGHT IS MY ORNATE GEORGE BECHTEL BREWING FROM STATEN ISLAND NEW YORK. I FOUND ALOT OF HISTORY ON THIS CO. AND ADDED IT BELOW.

CHARLES JOLY, 9 S 7th. street,  Sole Bottler  of Elwbecker Beer
Charles Joly was in business as early as 1848 according to one ad. The Philadelphia address in 1884 was No. 9 S. 7th St., and from 1908-1909, 1122 McClellan St. Jamaica Sarsaparilla was also put out in a 10 inch tall crown top variant.2 Charles Joly patented Joly’s Beer in Philadelphia in 1878

Household beverages: Eimbecker Bottled Beer, Genuine Tannhaeuser Bottled Beer, Jamaica Sarsaparilla (from 1895 Boyd's)  The company used the brand name: "Domino Rye."
 
JOLY STOPPER CO., Office and Works, p S. 7th st. Chartered for 99 years. Capital authorized, $50,000, par $100; Fullpaid. Annual Meeting, Nov. 30th. Object— Manufacture of stoppers and attachments. Officers—Charles C. Joly, President; Jos. A. Hoffman, Vice-President; George F. Joly, Secretary and Treasurer. Directors— Charles C. Joly, Jos. A. Hoffman, August Joly.

 HERE IS INFORMATION ON MR. JOLY GETTING PULLED FROM RESERVE DUTY INTO ACTIVE DUTY IN 1917

Each of the following officers of the Engineer Officers' Reserve Corps is assigned to active duty and will prt.ceed to Join the regiment to which he is assigned:

Capts. Charles L. Joly and Charles C. Cragin.   First Lieuts. James S. Hawley, Donald E. Rhlvers, Walter C. Sadler, and Conway R. Howard.

Second Lieuts. William E. Habcrlaw and James W. Kern, jr. Capt. Joly is assigned to the First Engineers (National Army), and will report in person to his regimental commander, Fort Totten, N. Y., for assignment to duty.

GEORGE BECHTEL, STATEN ISLAND NEW YORK

Staten Island, at a not remote period almost a barren strip of country, sparsely inhabited, and not of savory renown, has been transformed as if by magic, through the enterprise and efforts of some of its residents, into one of the most charming suburbs of the metropolis. Fast and handsome steamers make the trip to the city one of ease and pleasure, and rapid trains 011 the Island connect with the numerous pretty towns and the handsome villas with which it is dotted.

One of those who did much for this development, and at the same time built up a great business, was the late George Bechtel, of Stapleton,who died at his residence in that place on the 16th of July, 1889, after an illness of several months. He was born in Germany in 1840, and when an infant of but six months was brought by his

parents to this country. His father embarked in the brewing business at Stapleton about twelve years later, and when George was eighteen years of age he entered his employ as an apprentice, where by hard work and constant application he learned every detail of the business, and fitted himself by practical experience for the calling he was afterwards to follow, and in which he achieved a marked degree of success. In 1871 he became the sole proprietor of the business, and at once demolished the old buildings and erected large and handsome ones in their stead, still further enlarging and developing the business until it became one of the largest establishments of its kind in the country, the yearly output being nearly 125,000 barrels.

Mr. Bechtel was always a staunch and earnest Democrat, and aided in various and many ways to the interest of the party. He was one of the first trustees of the village of Edgewater, and in 1879 was elected supervisor of Mid/lletown without opposition, and held the office with honor and satisfaction to his fellow citizens for ten years. He was several times a dolegate to the Democratic state conventions, and was one of the Presidential electors in the fall of 1888. He was one of the first members of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, and always took great interest in the association, aiding it in many and material ways. He was also a member of the Deulscher Liederkrantz, Deutscher Verein, Klopstock Lodge No. 760, F. & A. M., Staten Island Quartet Club, Staten Island Schuetzen Corps, Ges Erheiterung, Staten Island Turn Verein, K. & L. of Honor, Excelsior Lodge, and Enterprise Hook & Ladder Co., No. 1.    We cannot do better than quote the words of one who was well acquainted with Mr. Bechtel in describing his funeral. "Some one has truly said that' faults and failures mingle with the lives of all.' George Bechtel's life was no exception to this rule, but his faults were so small and his failures so few, that they were entirely overshadowed by his virtues and his successes. Like most men,he was ambitious for wealth. He labored hard and honestly for it, but he did not hold it with a miser's grasp. He was kind, generous and liberal, and his charities were many,

but he was entirely devoid of ostentation in his giving. One of his latest charities was the founding of an hospital to be known as the Bechtel Free Hospital, and the Sisters of St Francis were to have charge of it. The funeral took place from his late residence, where service was conducted by the Rev. Albert Kuchne, pastor of the German Lutheran Church of Stapleton. The sermon was in German, and eulogized the deceased highly. There were about seventeen hundred people present. The streets for several blocks around were crowded, including the side streets. The general procession included one hundred and forty-one carriages. At the tomb the multitude was addressed by Lawyer Sixt. C. Kaft, who spoke in English, and Supervisor Credo who recited Mr. Bechtel's acts in both English and German. As the body was carried out, the German band played the dead march, and the Richmond County Schutzen Corps saluted as it was carried between the ranks. The pall-bearers were twelve in number, two of whom were the men who had been longest in Mr. Bechtel's employ, A Giegerich and Carl Mayer. The others were the members of the Klopstock Lodge of Free Masons. The floral display was unusually fine, and five carriages in the procession were filled with flowers. No doubt many would have wanted to send flowers to add to the beautiful display.A large number of business men from New York City and Brooklyn were present, as well as representatives from all the societies and organizations to which the deceased belonged."

Mr. Bechtel left a large estate valued at upwards of $2,000,000, consisting of the brewery and much real estate. He requested in his will, dated April 28, 1886, that the business should be continued under the same name as before, and appointed his wife, Eva

Bechtel, the sole legatee and executrix.

It is no exaggeration to say that George Bechtel was Stapleton's first citizen, and his death was a great loss to Staten Island.

GEORGE BECHTELS WEDDING GIFT TO HIS DAUGHTER

J.F WIESSNER&SONS, MD. ~ JAMES HOLMES, NY ~ WERNER BREWING CO., NY






















J.F. WIESSNNER & SONS, BALTIMORE MARYLAND AND A HONEY AMBER JAMES HOLMES AUBURN NEW YORK { SEE ABOVE FOR MY OLIVE YELLOW HOLMES AND CO. HISTORY} ON THE RIGHT IS ONE I DUG IN MECHANICVILLE, A RARE PONY WERNERS BREWING CO. MECHANICVILLE NEW YORK

 J.F. Wiessner & Sons Brewhouse : Baltimore, MD Date Built: 1877 Rehabilitation: 2007-2009 Original Use: J.F. Wiessner & Sons Brewhouse
New Use: Office and Program Space for Non-Profit Human Service Provider Project Background The property used in this adaptive reuse was a vacant, five-story, 26,000 gross square foot former beer brewhouse. The building was built in 1877 for the J.F Wiessner & Sons Brewing Co., and was originally one of two dozen buildings in a five-acre brewery complex. The brewery was sold to American Brewing, Inc. in 1933 and continued as a brewery until it was closed in 1973. In 1977 the property was donated to the City of Baltimore. In response to an RFP from the City, Humanim, Struever Brothers, Eccles and Rouse, and Gotham Development were awarded the rights to develop the brewhouse and the adjacent bottling plant in 2005. The American Brewery Building is located in the Broadway East neighborhood of Baltimore. The Project is approximately two miles northeast of the CBD and three-quarters of a mile north of Johns Hopkins University medical complex. The Broadway East neighborhood is a low-income area of row-houses and small commercial storefronts that suffers from a high degree of abandonment and blight. Roughly half of the properties in the area are vacant or have been demolished. The Project was developed by Humanim, a 35-year-old non-profit provider of social and human services that has worked in East Baltimore for 20 years. Humanim serves individuals with developmental, emotional, neurological and physical disabilities.

WELLER ~   W.E.DRISLANE ~   KIRCHNER BRO. ~  SALTZMANN BRO.

     



















OLIVE AMBER WELLER BOTTLING,SARATOGA SPRINGS NY, W.E. DRISLANE & CO ALBANY,NY,  KIRCHNER BROS. ALBANY NY & SALTZMANN BROS. OIL CITY PA.

Geo. Williams TRavers.

HISTORY FOR THE SALTZMANN BREWERY AT 4 UNION STREET,OIL CITY PA.
JOHN J. SALTAZMANN ~ 1881-1882     PALACE HILL BREWERY, JOHN J. SALTZMANN & SONS ~ 1882-1888
JOHN J. SALTZMANN JR. ~ 1888-1890     SALTZMANN BROTHERS {PALACE HILL} ~ 1890-1920
DUE TO PROBATION THE BREWERY CLOSED FROM 1920-1933     RESUMED OPERATION IN 1933
OIL CITY BREWING COMPANY ~ 1933-1936       THE BREWERY CLOSED IN 1936

KIRCHNER BROTHERS, ONE OF WHICH BEING LEO KIRCHNER WERE IN BREWING BUSINESS IN ALBANY FROM ABOUT 1877 UNTIL 1912  FROM WHAT I HAVE FOUND SO FAR    

Trade Names for the brewery at 8 Sherman Street, Albany, NY:
Kirchner & Co. (9 Central Ave) 1869-1877
J. Kirchner 1877-1882   J. Kirchner (Readdressed to 8 Sherman Street) 1882-1884    Estate of Jacob Kirchner 1884-1905
Kirchner Brewing Co. 1905-1912   Closed in 1912
Status of the building is unknown.

GEORGE BAUERNSCHMIDT ~ MARYLAND BREWING COMPANY  BALTIMORE

TWO OF MY PICKUPS FROM THE 2011 SARATOGA BOTTLE MUSEUM SHOW, GOTTLIEB ~ BAUERNSCHMIDT ~ STRAUS  BREWING COMPANY ON THE RIGHT AND MARYLAND BREWING COMPANY/GEO. BAUERNSCHMIDT BREWERY  ON THE LEFT

 

 GEORGE & JOHN BAUERNSCHMIDT 281 & 323 WEST PRATT STREET  1858~1864
GEO. BAUERNSCHMIDT GREENWOOD PARK BREWERY BELAIR AVENUE  1864~1887
GEO. BAUERNSCHMIDT BREWING COMPANY 1505 NORTH GAY STREET  1887~1899
MARYLAND BREWING COMPANY ~ GEORGE BAUERNSCHMIDT BREWERY 1899~1901
GOTTLIEB~BAUERNSCHMIDT~STRAUS BREWING COMPANY  1901~1915. CLOSED IN 1915

 

The Bauernschmidt families were very famous brewers of beer here in Baltimore. A tradition they brought with them from their Bavarian roots. George Bauernschmidt built a brewing empire in Baltimore starting in 1864 with the founding of his George Bauernschmidt Beer brand.

He continued the brewery for more than 30 years becoming one of the most popular brews in Baltimore, eventually bringing his sons into the operation. The years passed by and wanting to slow down and enjoy life a little more, George sold the business in 1898.  Becoming the Maryland brewing co. and then Gottlieb-Bauenrschmidt-Straus brewing co. until 1915. The sale of the business; however, angered his son Frederick so much that the younger Bauernschmidt started his own brewery.

The Frederick Bauernschmidt Brewery had so much success it eventually caused the financial downfall of the brewery founded by his father.

The Frederick Bauernschmidt Brewery would ultimately become the American Brewery located on Gay Street. The American Brewery was the most successful brewery in Baltimore at the turn of the century. The brewery building is still standing and has recently undergone major renovations

THE HARVARD BREWING CO., LOWELL, MASS. ~ D.C. DOWNING & CO., HOLYOKE MASS.


ON THE LEFT IS A RARE BOTTLE I GOT AT THE SARATOGA SHOW THIS YEAR, A VERY UNIQUE LIP FOR A BEER AND A LADY LEG NECK. DATED 1902, THE INFORMATION BELOW I FOUND AT  CENTER FOR LOWELL HISTORY – UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL LIBRARIES  AND GOES INTO GREAT DETAIL ON THE HARVARD BREWING COMPANY, PLEASE FOLLOW THE LINK TO SEE CREDITS AND OTHER GREAT MASS.  HISTORY 

ON THE RIGHT IS A PUSH UP BASE BLOWN IN MOLD COMPLETE  D.C.DOWNING & CO. FROM HOLYOKE MASS. I GOT RECENTLY, HAVE NOT BEEN ABLE TO FIND MUCH ON THE COMPANY BUT DID FIND THE OWNER WAS INTO PURE BRED DOGS

 

THE CONSUMERS' BREWING COMPANY  { HARVARD BREWING CO.}
     In 1893, a business was begun known as the Consumers'  Brewing Company.  Incorporated in West Virginia to take  advantage of the limited regulations in that state, Consumers' 
set up shop in Lowell, Massachusetts.  The men who organized   the company were from around the region.  Lowellian John H. Coffey, one of the primary organizers, owned a provisions shop in the city's Acre neighborhood with his two brothers.  Another important organizer was John J. Joyce of Lawrence  who ran an important bottling establishment in that city with  Maurice JCurran.  The stockholders of the brewery hailed  from all parts of New England and New York and elected  Joyce as company president and Coffey as secretary and  general manager.  The site chosen for brewing operations was well suited  for the company's needs.  A 12 acre parcel was purchased  from the estate of Sylvanus Bartlett along Plain and Payton  Streets in the Ayer's City section of Lowell.  The land was not  only adjacent to the main line of the New York, New Haven  and Hartford Railroad, it was also, more importantly, the location of an excellent fresh water well field.  The brewing  plant included a lager production and storage house, a similar  ale house, a bottling department, an office building, a boiler  house, horse stables, a cooper shop and other structures.  Over $250,000 was expended to build the plant including  the purchase of the best brewing equipment available.  The company also paid high salaries to recruit top brewery experts.  Consumers' first brewmaster was Louis Wentzler who previously worked for the Pabst Company of Milwaukee,  Wisconsin, at that time the second largest brewery in the nation.  The first batch of Consumers' brew was made in April of 1894  and, after aging, was ready for the market in June.  When  Consumers' was finally prepared to start business, the  company's employees and stockholders held a formal opening  with entertainment provided by Hibbard's Orchestra, lots of  German and American food and, of course, complimentary lager beer.  Although the brewery sent out 3,500 invitations, over  8,000 people showed up to Payton Street on the hot day of the  event.  One spectator to the opening related that, "Something  like 100 kegs of lager were consumed during the afternoon.  In  the early part of the afternoon the respectable invitees could  get up to the drinks but despite the efforts of the police under  Sergeant Webster the bum element crept in and secured  prime positions up front where they drank till they couldn't  stand up.  In the brewery are iron stairs.  These soon got  slippery and all gents with unsteady legs went down various  flights with their legs in the air.  After a while the bums became  so obnoxious and jaggy that the police made a final effort and  cleared them out quite effectively about 5 o'clock.  When the  bums were kicked out they lined Ayer City highways in all  directions, straggled across fields, sang, fought and blessed the  brewery." During the brewery's early years, a majority of the workers  were German immigrants who created a small but thriving  community in Ayer's City.  The Germans, carrying over  European traditions, organized in 1896 and formed the United  Brewery Workmen of the U.S.A.  The union was one of the  first in the nation to win an eight hour workday and helped  maintain excellent working conditions and benefits for its  members.  Some time later, the German workers built their  own community meeting place, Der Deutsche Halle (the  German Hall), in Plain Street across from the brewery, which  was used for union gatherings, cultural activities and company  functions.   

THE HARVARD BREWERY IS BORN In January of 1898, a stockholders meeting was held where  New York interests who recently gained control of a  majority in shares were represented.  One of the decisions  made at the meeting was to change the brewery's name to the Harvard Brewing Company in order to distinguish the concern  from other Consumers' Brewing Companies in Chicopee,  Massachusetts and in New York state.  Another change was in personnel, with the addition to the office leadership of  Ward B. Holloway who previously worked for the  Rochester Brewing Company.  Later in the year, Holloway  took over the position of secretary and general manager from  John Coffey while within a few years, John Joyce was  dropped down to vice president.  While Consumers' had focused on the local market, the  new management's efforts were geared toward making  Harvard a regional "heavy-hitter."  An expanded product line  up was introduced with ten labels including $1000 Pure Beer  Crimson Label, Dark Special, Brown Autumn Ale, Old Stock  Porter, Sparkling Pale Ale and Present Use Porter.  Manufacturing capacity was increased from 200,00 barrels  per year to 300,000 and, to finance the expansion, the  brewery's capital stock was increased from $300,000 to 
$500,000. Harvard's pre-prohibition years were marked by a building  boom as the company continually modernized the plant. Although the brewery was struck by a major fire at the lager house in 1900 which caused a $75,000 loss, production and improvements barely skipped a beat.  An 1,100 foot tunnel was dug in 1901 connecting the lager and ale houses with a walkway  and pipes for direct beer storage at the bottling department.  A  new wagon shed and a larger warehouse were constructed in  1907 with a new boiler house, condenser building and grain  storage tank built in 1910.  An extensive addition was also made  to the bottling house in 1914 creating one of the largest breweries  in New England. In order to further its business status during this era, the Harvard Brewery became profoundly involved in Lowell's governmental scene.  While this involvement helped the company  to smoothly navigate the increasing regulations imposed on large 
businesses it also established itself as a major target for political  criticism.  Alderman George H. Brown won the mayoralty  election of 1908 on a platform mainly based on breaking up "the  brewery's complete control of the politics of Lowell."  Allegations  that Harvard dominated the licensing of liquor dealers in Spindle  City came to a head when Holloway, Joyce and other managers  were arrested with members of the license commission on charges  of conspiracy.  Despite the submission of much incriminating  evidence, the death of a key witness led to charges being dropped  against the brewery officials. PROHIBITION COMES TO MILL CITY Survival of local political critics did not help the company stave off a more serious threat to its existence - the temperance  movement.  The passage of the Eighteenth Amendment in 1919, declaring the sale of alcoholic drinks to be illegal, sent the brewery scurrying to recast itself as a viable business.  With the expertise of the new brewmaster, Doctor Richard H. P. Juerst, and a name change to the Harvard Company, the brewery began offering non-intoxicating beverages such as root beer, ginger ale, grape juice and "near-beer."  Initially sales were reasonable but when the federal government imposed  embargoes on freight shipped around the region, Harvard soon  found it difficult to obtain adequate supplies as well as market  their non-alcoholic labels.  An attempt at diversification was the 
leasing of unused operations space for storage and warehousing  but this amounted to little revenue. In order to offset the dire financial situation, company  executives, including Director Frederick Quinn and Treasurer Bartholomew Scannell, decided to have Harvard make their "near-beer" a little nearer than federal law permitted.  Although profits naturally jumped, the illegal endeavor was short lived when a truck filled with 100 barrels of Harvard  beer was hijacked in Lowell during August of 1925.  As the hijackers were transferring the kegs of brew to their own private cars, their movements were noticed by most of the neighborhood.  An article in the Lowell Courier-Citizen reported that "As soon as it became known in the locality what was going  on, hundreds appeared and surrounded the truck.  They all  clamored for a chance to secure a barrel of the beer.  Men  came to blows and bedlam reigned.  Besides the men involved,  it is known that several women even procured barrels and rolled them along the sidewalks or in the streets to homes  thereabouts."  Naturally, the police became aware of the  disturbance and upon showing up to the scene, the mob  dispersed in all directions.  When the liquor squad inspected the back of the truck, they discovered only two dozen kegs still  remaining.  Tracing the truck to the Harvard Company, the  Lowell police called in federal agents from Boston.  When the agents tried to gain entrance to the brewery, Scannell refused them admittance for lack of a search warrant.  Upon hearing workers smashing barrels inside, the officers forced a door at the side of the building and found their shoes  immersed in four to five inches of spilled beer. It was reported  that laborers were casting full kegs of the Harvard product into  nearby River Meadow Brook so as to escape their seizure.  The raid was the largest in New England's prohibition history  with  over 100,000 gallons of full strength brew confiscated by the  government.  An extended trial led to the charges being dropped  against most of the company officials.  However, Director Quinn  and two of the owners were given fines ranging from $150 to $500.  By this time, the brewery was unable to pay its mortgage and was  auctioned off by Lowell real estate specialist Walter Guyette and  sold back to the bank. 
THE REOPENING OF THE BREWERY The federal elections of 1932 produced a slate of winners,  including Franklin D. Roosevelt, who were seriously dedicated  to repealing prohibition.  As the political climate looked very  promising towards the resumption of legal brewing, a group of  New York investors began searching for a brewery to purchase  and reopen.  The investors were led by Erwin Lange, who had previous experience managing breweries, and Walter Blumenthal,  a senior partner in a New York City banking firm. The syndicate's  search brought them to Lowell, where Walter Guyette convinced  Lange and Blumenthal to buy the dormant Harvard plant in  December of 1932.  The Harvard Brewing Company was reborn  with Lange as president, Blumenthal as treasurer and Guyette  named as a director.  When word spread that the brewery was to resume operations,  over 500 men showed up to Payton Street looking for work.  Although the job seekers could not be employed immediately,  President Lange instructed the watchman to take everyone's  name promising that former Harvard workers would be rehired  when the refurbishing of the brewery started. From March through  September of 1933 the Harvard plant underwent a complete  modernization at a cost well over $200,000.  Besides providing  jobs to brewery workers, the return of Harvard created a small  economic boom for local businesses who received the building  contracts and for the city which collected substantial taxes and  licensing fees. The company's large investment provided Harvard with the most  advanced brewing machinery available including a complete  bottling production line which mechanically washed the bottles,  filled them with brew, capped them off, pasteurized the product  and labeled the containers automatically.  When, in September of  1933, Harvard officially opened the bottling house, the brewery's  capacity reached 1,000 barrels of beer a day.  The return of Doctor  Juerst as brewmaster ensured that the product was of the same  consistency and flavor as before prohibition and contributed to the  success of sales. Harvard's only brand at first was the Green Label lager  which was widely advertised and distributed throughout the region.  The summer and fall of 1933 saw a backlog of orders  for the Green Label beer being built up, keeping the brewery  at maximum production.  To meet the large demand for Harvard's  product other labels such as Harvard Full Stock Ale,  Export Beer and Porter were marketed.  As a sign of loyalty  and good business sense, Harvard maintained a policy of  filling orders for Lowell clubs and distributors before others. Although sales were excellent for several years after  prohibition, by 1937 the Harvard Brewing Company was  headed for bankruptcy.  Another change in ownership, with  Fritz Von Opel as the primary investor, led to a change in the  company's leadership when, in 1938, Walter Guyette assumed  the position of general manager.  Through the efforts of Guyette,  Doctor Juerst and Treasurer Henry Protzmann and with  the  continual hard work put forth by the brewery laborers, the  company returned to its former position as a prosperous  concern by the time the United States entered the Second 
World War in 1941.
THE END OF HARVARD In the midst of Harvard's prosperity, the federal government  stepped in again to take control of the company.  In February  of 1942, Von Opel was arrested in Palm Beach, Florida and  interned as a "potentially dangerous alien" despite being a citizen  of the neutral European nation of Liechten-stein.  The brewery,  which Von Opel owned 97 percent of the shares and his father, Wilhelm, the other 3 percent, was seized under the Alien  Property Custodian Act. Heading up the Office of Alien  Property were Custodian Leo Crowley, a former Navy  admiral, and Assistant Custodian James Markham, a Lowell  lawyer whose brothers worked at the brewery.  When Von Opel was released, he fought an extended  legal battle to regain his assets from the government.  At the heart of the legal cases was $3,700,000 worth of stocks  which Von Opel unsuccessfully sought at the Federal District  Court and Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C. In 1951, Von Opel won a review to the United States Supreme Court.  In a unanimous decision, the justices again refused the return  of Fritz's stock holdings stating that Wilhelm Von Opel's three  percent interest was "paramount and controlling" while his son's  was "wholly subordinate." The government held the brewery for several more years  through the 1950's, long after the threat of Nazi Germany had passed.  By 1956, sales of Harvard beer had declined  considerably and political pressure on President Dwight  Eisenhower's administration led the government to finally release  the brewery.  After competitive bids were taken, Washington  sold off Harvard for $800,000 to a Miami, Florida real estate  concern called the Fort Knox Construction Company.  The Harris  brothers of Fort Knox appeared to be more interested in obtaining a seat on the New York Stock Exchange and in profiteering on the real estate value of the Harvard site than in  brewing beer.  In December of 1956, the Fort Knox Company sold the  Harvard Brewery to Peter Doelger, Inc. of New York for the  sum of $2 million.  The Doelger concern, realizing the poor  financial situation of Harvard, shut down the Lowell brewery  and moved production of Harvard beer to their own Hampden  Brewing Company in Willimanset, Massachusetts.  Doelger, Inc.  stripped the brewery of all its stores, machinery and equipment  and sold it off to companies as far away as South America.  Although the corporation had promised to set up a major  distribution center in Lowell and keep all former Harvard workers  employed, only a few people were kept on the payroll and offered  permanent positions out in Willimanset. As for the buildings, the lager house was heavily damaged in a  fire during 1957 and razed in 1961 with most of the other  structures to make room for the Sears shopping center built  during the early 1960's.  One contemporary critic noted the majorculpritinthe closing  of the Harvard Brewery; "The real difficulties came in the period  after December, 1941, when the property was seized by the  government.  Thereafter, in considerable degree, it became a  plaything in the hands of alert politicians. They used it  considerably as a patronage outlet, either in the assignment of  unnecessary positions, or in the purchase of goods that were  not needed.  Thus the brewery was stripped of much of its  stability as a going business."  Although the government effectively  ruined a great brewery, the memory of Harvard continues in the  company's paperwork and photographs, in the collections of  bottles, cans and advertising, and in the stories of the workers  themselves.

C.H. HAUSBURG, BLUE ISLAND ILL. ~ THOMAS BUSSENO~MECHANICVILLE

 

VERY SCARCE   URANIUM GREEN YELLOW C.H. HAUSBURG, BLUE ISLAND ILL. ~ VERY RARE THOMAS BUSSENO MECHANICVILLE N.Y. THIS IS ONE OF 4 KNOWN EXAMPLES OF THIS BOTTLE.......I HAVE TWO OF THEM IN MY COLLECTION.

1896 liquor license holders ~  Busseno, Thomas Mechanicville, Corner of  Park avenue & Railroad street

 

HENNESSY & NOLAN~ALBANY ~  HOLLAND & QUIGLEY~AUBURN ~ SCHENECTADY BREWING CO.

SCHENECTADY BREWING COMPANY IN 1893 FRED C WHITE AND GEORGE T FABRIOUS, BOTH OF 161 NOTT TERRACE SUCCEEDED PETER ENGEL BREWERY AND OPENED THE SCHENECTADY BREWING COMPANY AT 157~167 NOTT TERRACE. THEY BOTTLED FINE LAGER FOR FAMILY AND HOTEL TRADE. IN 1902, FRED C WHITE SUCEEDED THE BUSINESS. { INFORMATION FROM ROY TOPKA'S BOOK, SCHENECTADY BOTTLES} 3 VARIANTS ARE KNOWN, 2 BEERS AND ONE HUTCH. THE AQUA BEER BEING OLDEST

161 KNOTT TERRACE SCHENECTADY NEW YORK PETER ENGEL KNOTT TERRACE BREWERY ~ 1874-1891 SCHENECTADY BREWING COMPANY ~ 1891-1895 WHITE AND FABRICIUS COMPANY ~ 1895-1901, CLOSED DOWN IN 1901, FRED C WHITE SUCEEDED THE BUSINESS AT THIS POINT AND CONTINUED FOR AN UNKNOWN LENGTH OF TIME, IT DOES NOT SHOW IN ANY REGISTER AFTER THAT DATE.

QUINN & NOLAN BREWERY, 1845-1866 ~ 24 NORTH FERRY STREET, ALBANY NEW YORK
T.J. QUINN & M.N. NOLAN BREWERY ~ 1866-1884 QUINN AND NOLAN ~ 1884-1920, CLOSED IN 1934

THE HENNESSY & NOLAN BLOBS AND HUTCH BOTTLES ARE FROM THE THIRD QUARTER OF THE THE 1800'S AND THE BLOBS LIKE THIS ONE ARE VERY HARD TO OBTAIN. AND THEREFORE CONSIDERED RARE.

(2) COLUMBIA BREWERY, WEISS BEER, ST.LOUIS ~  WILLIAM H. GILMORE, N.Y. ~ AROMATIC WINE


HERE IS ONE I JUST GOT, A REALLY NICE COLOR W. GILMORE FROM PAVILLION NEW YORK. THIS AS STATED BELOW WAS AN AROMATIC WINE, VERY COOL AND REALLY RARE BOTTLE.IN THE CENTER MY GREEN WITH DARKER GREEN LINES AND DOTS IN THE GLASS COLUMBIA WEISS BERLINER BEER AND ON THE RIGHT IS A COLUMBIA BREWERY WEISS BEER, ST. LOUIS MO. WITH ORIGINAL BAIL AND STOPPER.

William H. Gilmore was born in Pavilion, October 23, 1836, a son of William and Mehitable (Smead) Gilmore. William was born at Cambridge, N Y., in 1809, came to Pavilion in 1826, opened a saddler's shop, and conducted the business for 51 years. He was also a general merchant for 18 years. His second wife was Sarah H. Carr. George Gil. more, father of William, was from Pittsfield, Mass., and was a sufferer by the raid of the Hessians during the Revolutionary war. The family are of Scotch descent. William H. Gilmore receiveda common school education, and is a graduate of the Albion Academy and Pittsburg Commercir.l College. At the age of 14 he entered a drug store. Two years later he went to school, where he continued for five years, and excepting one year spent in Iowa has always lived in this town, being engaged in the general merchandise and drug trade. In 1883 he organized the Gilmore Aromatic Wine Co., with a capital of

$20,000. whose products received the endorsement of the medical profession. In 1886 he sold out his interests in the company and the business was moved to Rochester. Mr. Gilmore has filled public offices for 17 years, being eight years postmaster of the village. He has been twice married, first to Ellen, daughter of James Wilson, and second to Elva, daughter of Edwin Fellows, of Orleans County. He has four children, Sarah E. and Nellie N. (twins), Clayton N., and Clarence H. The family are members of the Baptist Church, and Mr. Gilmore is a member of the order of A. O. U. W.

 William H. Gilmore. proprietor of Gilmore's Germicide, died at his home, 27 Gorham street, Rochester, N. Y., after an illness of several months. He was a native of Pavilion, N. Y., where he was prominent in both political and religious life. About ten years ago he came to Rochester, where he has since become well known as a manufacturer of proprietary articles

St. Louis, Missouri  Falstaff Brewery #5   Built: 1891   Originally: Columbia Brewery

Decay in the St. Louis Place neighborhood is often severe, but far from complete. A spectacular 1980s rehabilitation project brought new life to the Falstaff Brewery complex at Madison and 20th as well as the row houses across the street. New housing was built around this area steadily through the 1990s and 2000s, most of it fairly urban in form.

The brewery is one of only a handful remaining in the city; today it is the centerpiece of a National Historic Register district. The Columbia Brewery was founded in 1891 by a group of businessmen, in a time when St. Louis was on its way to becoming the beer capital of the country. Erected between 1891 with additions from 1901-1902, the Columbia building is a towering Romanesque structure in red brick. The architect is unknown, but the National Register nomination suggests as a likely candidate E. Jungenfeld & Co., the same firm responsible for the iconic buildings at Anheuser-Busch as well as work at Lemp.

It was bought up by the Falstaff company in 1948 (at which point it became Falstaff Plant No. 5), and continued to produce beer until abandoning the plant in 1969. Stripped of all interior metal by an owner who intended to demolish it in the early 1970s, Falstaff #5 narrowly escaped destruction for an aborted highway feeder route. In 1983 the city applied for grants to restore the building, leading to its 1986 conversion to apartments.

OBERMEYER & LIEBMANN'S ~ N.Y.CITY

OBERMEYER & LIEBMANN'S As far back as they can be traced, the Liebmanns, whose name is distinguished in the brewing world of America, have been a Wiirtemberg family, first at Aufhausen, and afterwards at Schmiedelfeld and Ludwigsburg. They belong to that celebrated element in the population of Wiirtemberg which has had almost a hereditary association with the land, and which has enriched America and perhaps her most skillful agriculturists. In the soil of Wiirtemberg they possessed a field bearing within its potentialities produce representative of almost every species of agriculture known to Europe's northern slope. And on that soil lived a hardy and talented race capable by energy and by every natural gift to win from the land all that it was capable of surrendering to human labor. Typical of Germany's most successful landed classes were the members of the Liebmann family, who have shown themselves capable of winning success in many fields, and still look back with pride on the generations that lived laboriously and well, on their charming Wiirtemberg homesteads. (I)

Joseph Liebmann, immediate ancestor of the Liebmann family, was born in the village of Aufhausen, in the Kingdom of Wiirtemberg, Germany, in 1756. He was identified with a variety of commercial interests, besides being engaged in a brokerage business, and was a prominent and active figure in his own community. Tradition represents him as a man of dignified and commanding personality, endowed with large and cultivated mental powers, such as made him without effort a leader to whom his neighbors turned for example and counsel. He was perhaps first of all a successful man of affairs. But he had also a large fund of learning, which made him an authority on a diversity of subjects among his fellow-townsmen. He died in 1819 at Aufhausen. He had been married to Bertha Froelich.

Samuel Liebmann, son of Joseph and Bertha (Froelich) Liebmann, was born at Aufhausen, November 12, 1799. He received his elementary education in the schools of his native town, an education that was supplemented by training and counsel in the family circle, and gave evidence at an early age of that masterly ability that was later to ensure his success. In the year 1832, following their father's death, Samuel and his brother Heinrich removed to Schmiedefeld, where they jointly bought a "gut," or farm. The two brothers were skilled agriculturists, ripe in judgment, and possessed of untiring energy. The land they purchased proved valuable property, which they were able to manage with great success for a period of about seven years, accumulating considerable wealth for the period. From Schmiedefeld, Samuel crossed over in 1840 to Ludwigsburg, in the Kingdom of Wurtemberg, a few miles from the city of Stuttgart, and Samuel purchased a combination brewery and gasthaus, which he was able to conduct with a large measure of success. The excellence of the Liebmann beer made his name well known throughout the region served by him, and so popular did his resort become that the royal soldiers made it their headquarters. The patronage of the troops had eventually much to do with his removal to America.

At that time the King of Wurtemberg was William I., whose reign over the land continued for almost half a century after he had been inaugurated in 1816. It was to William I. that Wurtemberg owed its reduction in taxes and public expenditures, as well as the liberal charter promulgated in 1819. But during the thirty years that followed, the people of Wiirtemberg progressed considerable in wealth and education, and above all in their conception of national liberty. Meanwhile William I. had left the generous aspirations of youth behind and had become set in his ways and in his adherence to kingly prerogatives. It was inevitable, therefore, that when the revolutionary sentiments in 1848 and 1849 passed over Germany, the bitterness of the political struggle in Wurtemberg would become greatly intensified. Samuel Liebmann sent his eldest son, Joseph, over the Atlantic to study the field from the standpoint of the possible establishment of a brewery business. In the autumn of 1854, a few months after the departure of his son, Samuel Liebmann left Germany with his wife and five children. The family arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 7, 1854, and were met on the wharf by Joseph, who conducted them to the home he had prepared in New York. Within a few days the father, with characteristic energy, rented a small brewery located on Meserole street in Williamsburg, Eastern District of Brooklyn. On November 27, 1854,

Less than a month after the arrival of the family, Mr. Liebmann had his brewery business in running order, with its earlier name of "Maasche Brewery" obliterated and the style and title of the "S. Liebmann Brewery" put in its place. Thus began the organization which won for Mr. Liebmann and his descendants the fame of being the acknowledged pioneers in the United States of the manufacture of beer through the Carree absorption of refrigeration as invented by Ferdinand Carree about 1850, and improved by Charles Leibmann in 1870. The method, it is true, was discontinued in 1872 as inadequate and inferior to the old fashioned ice-house as used to cool the cellars. But ten years later the absorption process of refrigeration was perfected and again put in use by the Liebmanns. Before the one year's lease of the establishment at Williamsburg had expired, Samuel Liebmann, with the aid of his sons Joseph, Henry and Charles, established a new brewery on Forest street, where they secured sufficient land to insure the permanency of the location as a brewery. Here the father and sons worked in perfect unison for a period of fourteen years. Finally in 1868 the head and founder of the business retired from active work, having almost reached the allotted span of three score years and ten, and being much affected by the death of his wife seven years earlier. He died at his home in Williamsburg, in the eastern district of the city of Brooklyn, New York, November 21, 1872.

Management was taken up entirely by the three sons, Joseph, Henry and Charles, between whom an appropriate division of labor was made. Joseph Liebmann was unquestionably the financial genius of the trio, and to him was intrusted the business, in, so to speak, its exterior relations, its representatives to the community. Henry, on the other hand, was left the conduct of the actual brewing operations, a province for which his talents and predilections particularly fitted him. Charles, again, was the engineer, the architect, the technical man of the firm, and to him was intrusted the maintenance and supervision of the plant itself, together with the duty of introducing such inovations as might be necessary to give to it the utmost effectiveness attainable through modern methods, and preserve its place at the head of similar establishments. These three equally important functions, then, were apportioned by mutual consent amongst the brothers, and the result has proven the wisdom of the arrangement. From its small beginning the business has grown to the point where the output from the establishment exceeded seven hundred barrels a year.

In the year 1883 the firm, which since the father's death had been known as S. Liebmann's Sons, was incorporated under the name of S. Liebmann's Sons Brewing Company. The year 1905 saw the simultaneous retirement of the three brothers from the concern, and the turning over of the business to two sons of each, who had all a long training in the various departments of the establishment. These six young men, grandsons of the originator of the great house

THE OBERMEYER NAMES SEEMS TO COME INTO THIS IN MARRAGE AFTER ARRIVING IN N.Y.CITY AND ALREADY RUNNING A BREWERY.

HENNESSEY & NOLAN ~ ALBANY, N.Y.

 
 
Hennessy & Nolan, Of Albany,

Usually make their own cider. They run it out of the press into large tanks (of about forty barrels capacity). It stands until it has thoroughly undergone both the vinous and acetous fermentation, which is known by the agitation ceasing; when in a hurry they use the feeding process. They generally make up a large quantity of cider and allow it to become "self-made vinegar." When going to run through the generator the juice is allowed to stand until it becomes a little sour, then it is siphoned off into a generator which consists of a cone-shaped cylinder about sixteen feet long, four feet in diameter at the top, and about three feet at bottom, filled with beech shavings tightly packed in, saturated first with strong vinegar; then the stock is run in at the top and the vinegar comes out at the bottom. Messrs. Hennessy & Nolan have an automatic arrangement for feeding the generator which regulates the flow of stock, so that there is never more in the generator at one time than it can perfectly convert. They claim, in this way, to be able to keep a much better control of the temperature and cause much less waste, to dispense with the services of a man, to run nights if needs be, etc. There is an upward current of air let in through openings in the generator, situated about three feet from the bottom and about fifteen inches apart, so that there are eight openings altogether. The inlet of air is regulated by means of perforated corks in these openings. After coming out of the generator, and from good stock, the vinegar would contain four per cent of acetic acid. It is now put into storage casks and allowed to stand until it is needed for market. During this condition more acetic acid develops, the amount depending upon the length of time and the temperature, also, largely, upon the stock. When it is to be put upon the market it is again siphoned off into casks.
 
 
 
 BOTTLERS, ALBANY.

Agreement between Bottler?s Union No. 375 and Proprietors of Bottling Establishments of Albany, N. Y.

ARTICLE 1. Only union men to be employed to fill the positions heroin

after named. No others to be employed to fill same positions while members of Local Union No. 375 are out of employment. All new or additional help to fill positions hereinafter named shall become members of Local No. 375.

ART. 2. Discharge of employees shall be for the following reasons: Disobedience of orders from his employers, for intoxication, for dishonesty, for incompetency, or disrespect to his employer. In case of discharge when the employee believes himself unjustly dealt with, he can call his fellow employees as witnesses; their disposition must be made in writing and placed before the arbitration committee.

ART. 3. Nine hours shall constitute a day?s work all the year round, the hours being from 7 o?clock A. 11. until 5 o?clock P. 11., one hour to be allowed for dinner; this clause, however, to apply to inside men only, peddlers to work on a schedule of fifty-four hours a week. There shall be no Sunday work, except- as provided for elsewhere in this agreement.

ART. 4. All overtime to be paid for at the rate of time and one-half, except Sunday and holiday work when the rate shall be double the regular wages.

ART. 5. Election Day, Iabor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, Decoration Day, and July Fourth shall be considered holidays, Without reduction in week?s pay; the proprietor has the right, however to call upon a sufficient force to do only necessary work for not more than three hours.

ART. 6. The arbitration committee shall consist of three members of the joint local executive board, and not more than three members of the Albany, N. Y., Bottling Establishment Proprietors who have signed this agreement. In case of disagreement they shall add a disinterested person to enable them to come to an agreement. A majority decision of the above named committee shall be final.

ART. 7. The wages paid shall be as follows: Peddlers, $15 ; wagon helpers, $10; beer bottlers, $14; mineral water bottlers, $16; assistant bottlers, $12. Where two or more men are employed inside one shall be the assistant bottler.

ART. 8. This agreement shall take effect June 1, 1907, and shall remain in force until May 31, 1908. And if a new agreement shall be presented by either party a notice of twenty-one (21) days shall be given; and if no new agreement is presented by said tinie, the old previous agreement shall remain in force as before.

ART. 9. The Bottling Establishment Proprietors agree to use only union made goods in the manufacture of their products.

Bottlers:
JAMES J. McGaAw & Brio,    Hoooxms &, RUEFLE, for UNION BOTTLING Woaxs,   EMIL C. Roscns,
HENNESSEY & NOLAN,  Amos Hzmmca,   Hsosrcx Bnswmo Co.,   WILLIAM Rsmscx,    JOHN H. SUTLIFF,
S. KAPLAN,    A. C. & G. F. WEBER,     B. J. E. MULLEN, per JOHN MULLEN,   Gnonon HALLENBECK, per Dsvm HALLENBECK
D.J. WHELAN BREWING  ~ TROY NEW YORK

THREE VARIANTS OF D.J. WHELAN , TROY N.Y. BLOBS. THE ONE ON THE LEFT BEING THE RAREST  















Hon. D. J. Whelan, Bottling Works and Weiss Beer Brewery; Dealer in Drain and Sewer Pipe, Nos. 104 and 100 Jefferson Street, Corner of Fifth Street.?Troy has deservedly acquired national celebrity as a great manufacturing centre, and as a city whose leading inhahitants have availed themselves to the utmost of the advantages at hand. No one has labored more earnestly or more disinterestedly on behalf of the city than the Hon. D. J. Whelan. the mayor, and whose appreciated support has ever been accorded to all measures best calculated to advance the permanent welfare and solid prosperity of the community. Mayor Whelan is the proprietor of the only Weiss Beer brewery in Troy, and the fame of its product has resulted in a consumption of great magnitude. The business was founded many years ago, and includes a very large and thoroughly equipped bottling department devoted to the bottling of pure soda water, lemonade, ginger ale, blrch beer, etc. Mr. Whelan is possessed of the widest range of practical experience, coupled with perfected facilities and influential connections.

FEIGENSPAN & CO. BREWING CO.  ~   NEWARK ~ N.J. ~ TURTLE BAY LAGER, OCEANIC ~ N.J.

ON THE RIGHT IS ANOTHER PICTURE BLOB FROM NEW JERSEY (OCEANIC) . JOS. STROHMENGER ~ FRED OPPERMANN JR. TURTLE BAY LAGER BEER BREWERY. GOT TO LOVE THE MAN RIDING ON TURTLE WITH GLASSS OF BEER HELD HIGH.

 

ON THE LEFT, ANOTHER GREAT PICTURE BLOB I RECENTLY PURCHASED, EMBOSSED STEMMED GLASS OF BEER WITH HAND. I WONDER IF SINCE THIS BREWER BOUGHT OUT DOBLER OF ALBANY IN LATE 1890S   IF THATS WHERE THE HAND HOLDING GLASS IDEA CAME FROM AS THAT WAS ONE OF DOBLERS TRADEMARKS AS WELL.

Looks like the brewery started sometime before 1850 and was known as

Aktien Brauerei.
It was located at 322 East 45th between 1st and 2nd Aves.

It is listed
1850 - 1869 as Turtle Bay Brewery , Franz Ruppert (322 East 45 & 785 1st Ave.)

1869-1874 Turtle Bay Brewery, Jacob Robinson
1878- 1896 Frederick Oppermann, Junior., Turtle Bay Brewery (330/336 East 45th st.)
1896- 1897 Estate of Frederick Oppermann, Jr.
1897- 1910 Frederick Oppermann, Jr. Brewing Co.


(apparently absorbed into George Gillig compound and operated as
Turtle Bay Brewery until some time in the 1890s)

Some notes on Gillig:

1853- 1862 George Gillig ( 320 / 346 East 46th St.)
1862- 1865 George Gillig's Estate
1865- 1873 John G. Gillig & Frederick Oppermann
1873- 1875 Gillig, Oppermann & Co
1875- 1884 Oppermann & Mueller, Turtle Bay Lager Beer Brewery (44th & 45th between 1st and 2nd Aves)
1884- 1886 Frederick Oppermann, Jr.
1892- 1911 Thomas Conville Brewing Co.

It appears that Gillig operated breweries at other locations from 1840 - 1853

Nov 18 1881

Next week there will be three notable sales. The l.OCO lots, old park lands of the city of Brooklyn, will be disposed of on Thursday, November 17. This great •ale, if it takes place as announced, will mark an epoch in the history of Brooklyn. Great things are expected of the newly elected Mayor. He will not be hampered by a corrupt
Common Council, and If he should succeed In cutting down expenses so as to largely reduce taxation, Brooklyn will be a very desirable place to live In. The completion of the brigde and the construction of an elevated road promise to make a great change in the prospects of our sister city. Another important sale takes place at the New York Exchange on the same day, November 17. At that time the Turtle Bay Brewery, which runs through from Forty fourth to Forty-fifth streets, between First and Second ???????, is to be sold. This property includes twelve full city lots. Not only Is there a fully equipped building for brewing lager beer or ale, but the property Includes a fine hall and saloon, known as the Turtle Bay Assembly Rooms. For manufacturing purpose« this property Is equal to any on the Island. All the signs of the times indicate that New York is again to become a great manufacturing centre, and this property is so admirably located that It can be turned to a dozen different uses, all profitable. The auctioneer in this case will be Lewis J. Phillips. On next Tuesday, the )5th, Adrian H. Muller will preside at a Trustee's sale of forty-two West Side lota, some of which embrace the choicest locations on the island. Ther« are to be then sold four Riverside lots on the southeast corner of One Hundred and Third street, four Boulevard lots on the southwest corner of One Hundred and Second street, and then there are choice Tenth, Eleventh and Twelfth Avenue lots. This will be an Important sale, as showing the views of speculators and Investors in West Side lots proper. The time will certainly come when thisS|jlenlld property, overlooking one of the finest rivers in the world, will command very high prices. 


Charles Kolb Newark, NJ 1866 - ??  ~  C. Feigenspan & Co. Newark, NJ 1875 - 1879
Christian Feigenspan, Inc. Newark, NJ 1879 - 1920  

 Christian Feigenspan Brewing Co. Newark, NJ 1933 - 1943  Ballentine Brewing Co. Newark, NJ 1943 - 1945    P. Ballantine & Sons Newark, NJ 1945 - 1948
The brewery started at 49 Charlton Street in Newark, New Jersey in 1875. In 1878 he moved the brewery to 47 Belmont Avenue in Newark, New Jersey.

Around 1890 the brewery was moved to the corner of Freeman and Christie Streets. Later, control was gained of the Dobler Brewing Co. of Albany, New York, and the Yale Brewing Co. of New Haven, Connecticut

J. SCHROEDER B.W.B. Co. St. LOUIS & SARATOGA ADIRONDACK WATER

 

ONE OF MY LATEST, GREAT COLOR GREEN J. SCHROEDER B.W.B. CO. FROM ST. LOUIS, LISTED AT 834 CHOUTEAU AVE. FROM 1888 UNTIL 1890 AT WHICH TIME THE OPERATION MOVED TOO 1013 PAUL STREET AND REMAINED THERE UNTIL THE BREWERY CLOSED IN 1917. BREWERS OF BERLINER WEISS BEER. I HAVE ADDED THE HISTORY OF BERLINER WEISS BELOW. SARATOGA ADIRONDACK WATER WITH BLOB TOP, NOT AT ALL COMMON IN BLOB FORM. 

Berliner Weisse Beer is a cloudy, sour wheat beer of around 3% achohol by vol. It is a regional beer from Northern Germany, mainly Berlin, dating back to the 16th century.By the 19th century, Berliner Weisse was the most popular alcoholic drink in Berlin, and 700 breweries produced it. By the late 20th century there were only two breweries left in Berlin producing the beer, and a handful in other parts of Germany. The name "Berliner Weisse" is protected in Germany, so it can only be applied to beers brewed in Berlin. However, there are a number of American and Canadian brewers who make a beer in the Berliner Weisse style, and use the name.

Most beer authorities trace the origins of Berliner Weisse to an unknown beer being produced in Hamburg which was copied and developed by the 16th century brewer Cord Broihan. Broihan's beer, Halberstädter Broihan, became very popular, and a version was being brewed in Berlin by the Berlin doctor J.S. Elsholz in the 1640s. An alternative possibility, given by Protz among others, is that migrating Huguenots developed the beer from the local red and brown ales as they moved through Flanders into Northern Germany.Some sources, such as Dornbusch, give the date 1572 as being the earliest record of the beer being brewed in Berlin.

Frederick Wilhelm encouraged the spread of the beer through Prussia, declaring it as "best for our climate", and having his son, Frederick the Great, trained to brew it. A popular story is that Napoleon's troops dubbed it "The Champagne of the North" in 1809.
A typical modern strength for Berliner Weisse is around 3% abv, though strength may have varied at times. Traditionally, beers brewed in March (Märzen beers) were brewed stronger and allowed to mature over the summer months, and there is a report that this may have also happened with Berliner Weisse — the bottles being buried in sand or warm earth.
Brewing

Modern brewing methods use a low proportion of wheat, generally ranging from 25% to 50%, and deliberately create a sourness either by a secondary fermentation in the bottle (Jackson suggests that traditionally bottles were buried in warm earth for several months), or by adding Lactobacillus.Records from the early 19th century indicate that the beer was brewed from five parts wheat to one part barley, and drunk young, with little indication of creating sourness with either a secondary fermentation or by adding Lactobacillus. Berliner Weisse flavoured with Woodruff
At the height of Berliner Weisse production in the 19th century, it was the most popular alcoholic drink in Berlin, and 700 breweries produced it.By the end of the 20th century there were only two breweries left in Berlin, and a handful in the rest of Germany. The two Berlin breweries, Berliner Kindl and Schultheiss, are both now owned by the Oetker Group and the only brand still produced in Berlin is Berliner Kindl Weisse.

Berliner Weisse is typically served in a bowl-shaped glass with flavoured syrups, such as raspberry (Himbeersirup), or woodruff (Waldmeistersirup).The beer may also be mixed with other drinks, such as pale lager, in order to balance the sourness.

 J.H. FARRINGTON ~ SARATOGA  ~ J. HEFFERNAN ~ SARATOGA

                                                





THE  J.H. FARRINGTON HOUSE ON NORTH BROADWAY, SARATOGA SPRINGS LATE 1800'S,LONG TIME BOTTLER IN THE TOWN.THERE ARE A FEW VARIANTS OF THESE BOTTLES, I HAVE 4 NOW & AS TIME PERMITS I WILL PICTURE THEM ALL. 

 Heffernan, Edward J., was born in Saratoga Springs, August 29, 1856, a son of Peter and Sarah (Gunning) Heffernan. His mother's father was one of the old landmarks of Saratoga Springs and her brother, John Gunning, was a prominent lawyer. Mr. Heffernan learned the printing trade with B. F. Judson in his boyhood, and in the days of hand composition, before the advent of the typesetting machines, he was one of the most rapid compositors in this part of the country.,working the greater part of the time on the Daily Saratogian.

He followed this trade from 1869 to 1889, and in September of the latter year embarked in the bottling business, which he has since conducted. Here his energy and enterprise met with swift recognition and prompt success, and he has built up one of the largest and most lucrative trades in his line in that part of the State. He is one of the best known men in public life in Saratoga Springs. He was elected excise commissioner for two terms (six years), and is serving his second term on the board of trustees. He was first elected for the old Second ward and now represents the Fourth ward, the first term being for the years 1892-93, his present term for 1897-98. On April 24, 1878, Mr. Heffernan married Catherine Farrell. He is a member of the Order of Elks, the Ancient Order of Hibernians, the C. M. B. A. and the Typographical Union.

Mr. Heffernan has always been a straight, sterling and strenuous Democrat, and he is a power in the organization. He served on the Board of Excise Commissioners for many years, and has also been for several terms a member of the village Board of Trustees. He is a strong man, with brains and courage, and his gift for leadership brings him always to the front in every enterprise in which he is engaged. He has been a delegate to the Democratic State Conventionand also to many. other conventions, and he has been recognized as one of the most influential Democrats in Saratoga County.

 J.H. Farrington, son of Jacob K. and Lucretia E. (Austin) Farrington, b. Otsego Falls, Essex Co., N.Y., s. 1861, Wholesale Wine Merchant, 446 Broadway
(NEWS ART.1886)  Some of the assessment companies make large gains through a harsh working of their lapsing conditions. Mr. J. H. Farrington, a wholesale candy dealer of j Saratoga Springs, N. Y., a policy-holder for $10,000, after paying $283.60 in two years, was assessed for a sum which  was to be paid by January 31, 1886. The company was the Mutual Trust Fund Life Association of New York. The policy-holder mailed the check the 29th of December. It reached New York City after 3 p. m. of the 30th, Saturday. It was delivered to the insurance company Monday, the 1st, and the insured was frozen out This act the policyholder, in a letter to the New York Mercury, brands as strange and dishonorable. It is surely a sign of weakness if the company find it necessary to return to a policy holder his money, after that policy-holder has proved his worthiness to participate in the plan of insurance on which these companies are based. If the companies cannot stand by their old friends, their main idea is a bad one. Did they take in no new business that Monday on which they sent back Mr. Farrington's money ? Was new money better than old money ?


ARLINGTON BOTTLING CO. WASHINGTON, D.C.  ~  DULUTH BREWING/MALTING CO.

DULUTH BREWING & MALTING,ST PAUL BRANCH DULUTH MINN.

ON THE LEFT IS MY VERY SCARCE ARLINGTON BOTTLING CO. BOTTLE, I LIVED IN ARLINGTON FOR A SHORT WHILE. GREAT PLACE.

<<<<<<<<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>

 

Duluth Brewing & Malting Co. (29th Ave, West & Helm Street) 1896-1920

Rex Sobriety Co. 1920-1932   Aka: The Rex Co. (L-18) 1920-1932

Brewery operations shut down by Minnesota State Prohibition in 1920

Issued permit L-?? for the production of non-alcoholic beverages during Prohibition 1920

Issued U-Permit No. MN-U-829 allowing the resumption of brewing operations 1933

Duluth Brewing & Malting Co. (Readdressed to 229/303 29th Avenue West & 2902/2916 Helm Street) 1934-1966

Closed in 1966  Status of the building is unknown.
Products:
Imperial Beer  1896 - 1920 Keg Beer  1896 - 1920
Porter  1896 - 1920 Rex Beer  1896 - 1920
Weiner Beer  1896 - 1920  XXX  1896 - 1920
(Compliments Tavern Trove)


 Consumers/Arlington Brewery
In 1890 a new brewery was founded in Rosslyn in Arlington (then Alexandria) County. Originally named the Consumers Brewing Company, the brewery was built on the banks of the Potomac, where the Rosslyn Marriott now stands. A new brewery building was built in 1897. It was designed by local architect Albert Goenner.  Goenner also designed other local building, including the original Arlington County Courthouse built in 1898.  The brewery was made with bricks from the local brickyards that lined the Potomac on the Virginia side where National Airport now stands.  The bricklayers placed several horseshoes and a mule shoe at the top of the brewery smokestack for luck.  The brewery was a large red brick building, with turrets at each end, a clock tower in the center, and the large smokestack.  The building
must have stood out along the riverfront near the old aqueduct bridge. The brewery made light lager, a dark lager, ale and a porter, much of which it sold locally to the many saloons which dotted Rosslyn at the time. It advertised that it would deliver its products within the local area for free, deliveries made with an unmarked wagon. In 1902 the brewery was sold and renamed the Arlington Brewing Company.  In 1903 Arlington voters eager for reform elected a new county attorney, Crandal Mackey.  Mackey won with the promise to clean up the local community.  Rosslyn and Jackson City (both in Arlington) were red light districts serving the vices of Washington, DC. Filled with saloons that illegally operated on Sundays along with gambling halls and brothels, the area embarrassed many Arlingtonians. There were even two race tracks, including St. Asaph's located in what is now Alexandria City. In early 1904 Mackey instructed the county sheriff to begin closing the illegal gambling houses. By the end of May the sheriff still had taken no action, so Mackey obtained warrants to raid the establishments himself. He gathered a small group of citizens he trusted and deputized them. On the afternoon of May 30 Mackey and his deputies began raiding the illegal gambling houses and saloons, destroying gaming equipment, furniture, smashing bottles of booze and glasses and gathering enough evidence to prosecute the owners of the illegal businesses.   While there are no surviving records showing what beer the local saloons sold, these raids almost certainly had an effect on the Arlington Brewery.  Mackey's raids didn't end the brewery's local problems.  In January 1910 a fire destroyed the stables next to the brewery causing $20,000 damage.  Arlington fireman saved the main building.  A small fire had started in the same spot in the stable's hayloft two weeks before.  Since no lamps were in the area it was thought that a former employee may have started the fires.  Forty horse were released from the stables when the fire was discovered by a watchman.  They ran free until corralled by locals.   Fire companies from Virginia and DC fought the blaze.  Fire hoses were routed through the brewery to reach the fire as firemen fought to save surrounding buildings.   Virginia went dry in the autumn of 1916 finally closing the brewery.  During Prohibition the facility produced Cherry Smash soda. The brewery did not reopen after Prohibition ended in 1933 and was used as a warehouse. It was torn down in 1958 to make room for a new hotel.

 BARTHOLOMAY BREWING COMPANY , N.Y. ~ SCHEDEL, SARATOGA SPRINGS

     A RECENT TRADE FROM MEMBER LENNY, REAL NICE BARTHOMAY BREWERY WITH WHEEL AND WINGS. BALTIMORE LOOP TOP AND DATED TOO 1880-90 RANGE. PRETTY SCARCE BOTTLE IN AMBER OR ANY COLOR, ON THE RIGHT IS A MINT EXAMPLE OF A VERY SCARCE LOCAL BLOB. JOHN SCHEDEL, SARATOGA NEW YORK. I HAVE ONLY EVER SEEN A HALF DOZEN OF THESE AND MOST WERE NOT COMPLETE.

  

1852: Philip Will and Henry Bartholomay become partners in the brewing concern, Will & Bartholomay  1857: Henry Bartholomay becomes sole proprietor of the business

1874: Bartholomay Brewing Company started May 1  1889: Name change to Bartholomay Brewery Company. Three breweries were bought by an English investment
syndicate for $3.5 million, including the Genesee Brewing Company, the Rochester Brewing Company,  and the Bartholomay Brewing Company. In addition, the E.B. Parsons Malting Company and the
  S.N. Oothout & Son Malting Company are picked up in the deal. The name "Bartholomay" is kept. 

Bartholomay brewing co. buildings overlook the upper falls. They run 450 feet including the brew house ,frieght depot, offices,stables and pitching house.

the brewer employed 150 men and produced 300,000 barrels of beer a year. 75 large handsome grey horses hauled the kegs and bottles of beer to homes & establishments around the city.

The capability of cooling by refridgeration gave the brewer greater tempature control during the brewing process. Refridgeration also helped capture larger market with the introduction of refridgerated rail cars.Bartholomay was also connected too the main Central~Hudson railroad by the upper falls bridge, also called the "brewers railroad".

In the winter men and boys cut ice from the ponds and lakes in the area An ordinance was passed stating the brewers were required to state where they collected their ice from. Spitting on ponds and lakes where is was being collected was forbidden.

In 1890 Bartholomay & Rochester Breweries started using the Genesee river water instead of Lake Hemlock for making ice for cooling. The breweries stated they could pump and store the river water for one cent per 1000 gallon's where as the Hemlock cost fourteen cent's per 1000 gallons. The Rochester brewery alone saved 65.00 a day. The Rochester and Bartholomay breweries dug well's into the bank of the Genesee river capable of holding 160,000 gallons. The rock naturally filtered the water and was 10 degree's cooler than the flowing river water. 

 W.H.HENNESSEY, LYNN MASS. ~ L.I. BREWING, BRAUNSCHWEIGER MUMME BRAU   

W.H. Hennessey was a saloon and lunch room owner from 1882 to 1884 at the corner of Union & Exchange Streets, then at 123 Broad and 1-1/2 Exchange in 1886, later at 211 Broad and 54 Spring St (from 1888-1889). By 1900 he was in Wholesale Liquors at 40 Andrew St. In 1917, his widow has taken over the business.

Long Island Bottling Co-'s "Braunschweiger Mumme" malt extract is thoroughly advertised as a "substitute for solid food." The demand for it is supplied by the druggist, and as warm weather approaches this demand will increase rapidly. Look to your stock of this popular extract along with other spring medicines.

 The printed testimony is accompanied by an anonymous statement entitled " doctoring beer," to the following effect: The preparation of beer, in consequence of scientific research, is now more deliberate, methodical, and reliable than for•merly. Beer is a beverage prepared from cereals, as barley, rice, corn, or wheat, seasoned with hops, and fermented. In former years articles were added to give a certain taste or increase its stability, but this practice was given up by brewers almost on their own account, because it appeared useless, and it was found that with proper management the natural way was best. Stability only remains a vexed question. The brewers do not willingly emancipate themselves from certain preservatives, which perhaps promote carelessness and unprofessional work, but there is no room in beer for chemicals of any kind, as distinguished from the natural product. Brewers can get along without carbonate of soda, salicylic acid, benzoic acid,saccharin, ammonium fluoride, etc., and must reach the point where they can prepare stable beers of good taste without adding foreign substances. There is no objection to sterilizing beers by high or low temperatures, but brewers ought to have nothing to do with drugs, for they can not take the responsibility for them, which belongs only to chemists and physicians, and their use shows a certain lack of competency, giving their enemies a weapon, enabling them to bring the brewing trade into disgrace, and affording a pretext to legislatures to lay their hands upon the industry. Germany, the greatest and most renowned beer country in the world, has long since done away with these drugs, and the scientific and practical authorities of that country, who speak with respect of American brewing methods, are shocked by the public advocacy of preservatives.    2. Use in beer for export, bottling, and long shipment.—Mr. Brown, president of the Long Island Brewery, says that he uses preservatives only in beer for export or for distant shipment. He has experimented with salicylic acid, but has not been very well satisfied with it. He does not use any preservatives in barreled beer, but would think it necessary if beer in barrels were to be shipped to a great distance and subjected to changing temperatures.   Professor Mitchell says preservatives are used especially in beer for bottling and exporting. Brewers who have good methods do not need to use them in lager beer which is quickly consumed, but in bottled beers which are shipped long distances the easier way is for the brewers to use preservatives. He has found antiseptics in some of the bottled beers.   Mr. Zeltner. a lager beer brewer, says that he uses salicylic acid in beer which may go out of the country and be kept for an indefinite time.   Mr. Wackenhuth, brew master for Ballantine & Co., says that he uses salicylic acid for bottling beer only, and only for abotit 5 months in the summer. He considers everything that he uses perfectly sound and healthful.  Mr. Wyatt states that there is practically no use of antiseptics in barreled beer designed for draft purposes, except when it is shipped, as it sometimes is, from one end of the continent to the other, and may be exposed to severe and sudden changes of temperature. In such cases it has been customary, and he has advised brewers, to use salicylic acid, which he regards as the least harmful of antiseptics. The amount used would be about one part in five thousand, or a little less than half an ounce per barrel of 31J gallons. That is about one-fourth grain of salicylic acid per glass of beer. Mr. Wyatt would only advocate the use of antiseptics "when it is absolutely necessary for the preservation of the beer. He has never known of the use of any other preservative than salicylic acid and bisulphite of lime. He has heard of various others being proposed, but has always denounced them. The great majority of brewers do not do a shipping trade, and never use a particle of salicylic acid.  Mr. Schwartz, a consulting brewer, says that salicylic acid and compounds of sulphurous acid, such as the sulphites of sodium, potassium, and lime, are used in moderate quantities in shipping and bottled beers. He considers them necessary, and harmless in the quantities in which they are used. Whether the beer is in wood or in bottles, if it is to be exposed to frequent changes of temperature, something should be added to keep it good. Even when beer is pasteurized a little preservative should be added. It is impossible to employ sterilized bottles; the filling implements, hose, and so forth, are more or less exposed to the air, and it is impossible altogether to exclude bacteria or to be sure of destroying them by steaming. It is not necessary to add a preservative to beer which is to be used near the place of manufacture, and without long keeping. Alluding to the fact that the addition of preservatives to beer is forbidden in Bavaria, Mr. Schwartz says there is no country where there is more complaint about the quality of beer, and he attributes the complaint to the lack of preservatives. It is impossible in any country, he says, to exclude the germs of bacteria. They cause a change of flavor and taste, which can not be stopped because the use of preservatives is forbidden. The result is that the beer is found poor and bad and it is thought that the brewer must have used improper materials.  Mr. Schwartz would recommend for bottled beer about half an ounce of salicylic acid to the barrel of 31 gallons, or less than one one-hundredth of 1 per cent.   Mr. Wioan, a brewing master, says that he uses bisulphite of lime, and he seems to intend to say that he also uses salicylic acid. He would not use so much as one one-hundredth of 1 per cent. The general tendency is to increase the quantity used with the warmth of the climate. Yet in his experience in England he used rather more than he is accustomed to use in America.

S. In foreign beers.—Mr. Wyatt says that he has had occasion to analyze imported beers and ales and wines and has almost invariably found preservatives in them. He would use them if he were shipping to a foreign port. The phrase " Bass stink," which used to be used to describe the smell of Bass's ale, referred to the odor of sulphuretted hydrogen, which came from the bisulphite of lime  which was used as a preservative. A long series of experiments, extending over many years, has shown that bisulphite of lime has no injurious effects whatever, and is a much more desirable antiseptic than salicylic acid. It is found impossible to use it in this country. People will not drink American beer which contains it. The trouble may be in the nature of our water or in some fault of manufacture.

Mr. Schwartz states that imported lager beer contains about the same amount of salicylic acid which is used in this country, and that imported ales from England contain sulphites in larger quantities than are used here.   Mr. Plautz thinks that all beers imported into this country contain a very little salicylic acid. The Bavarian Government prohibits the use of salicylic acid, but would not prohibit it, Mr. Plautz thinks, if the beer were to be exported.   Mr. Thomann says that the Bavarian law forbids the use of preservatives in beer, but he thinks it is tacitly understood that preservatives may be put into beer which is to be shipped beyond seas. Mr. Thomann does not believe that the beer could be sold here in such an excellent state of freshness if preservatives were not used. Bass's ale has a peculiar smell when the bottle is opened, which is sometimes called the " Bass stink." This is the smell of the preservative.

Dr. Wiley says that among 15 different beers bought at different places in New York, at least half of them being foreign, 4 were found to contain salicylic acid. Of the foreign bottled beers, 2 samples contained salicylic acid in quantities sufficient to preserve them from fermentation. Of the domestic beers bottled and sold within 2 or 3 weeks only 2 contained salicylic acid.

Mr. Eitel, an importer of beer from B.tvaria and Bohemia, asserts positively that the beer which he gets from Munich contains nothing but malt and hops.

D.D. HANOLIN~CEDARHURST LONG ISLAND  ~  OTTO HUBER BREWING LONG ISLAND

2 OF MY FAVORITES~D.D.HANOLIN CEDARHURST L.I N.Y.  OTTO HUBER BREWING CO. BROOKLYN N.Y.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTTO HUBER. Otto Huber, recently deceased, was one of the most extensive and successful manufacturers of Brooklyn, and his public spirit and business sagacity led him to aid materially in promoting the interests of that city by employing his large means in various enterprises of public usefulness. He was born in 1866, in Brooklyn, son of Otto and Emily Huber. The father, a native of Baden, Germanv, prior to 1866 came to Brooklyn, where he secured employment in the Schneider brewery, and there had as a fellow workman George Eh ret, who subsequently became conspicious as a master brewer. About 1866 Mr. Huber established a brewery of his own, and from it has grown the present mammonth establishment. Of his marriage with Miss Mayer were born four sons, Otto, Charles. Joseph and Max; and three daughters, Mrs. Frank Obernier, Mrs. William H. DeEsterre, and Miss Frances Huber. Mr. Huber died in 1889, and his widow, a beautiful woman, is yet living. The junior Otto Huber was educated in his native city, and at an early age entered the establishment of his father, and became familiar with all the manufacturing processes and business methods of the house. His father had ben incapacitated for active usefulness during his latter years, through a heart ailment, and the son came into the management of the business long before he attained his majority, and, after the death of the parent, he continued in control in the interest of the estate. He cherished the same personal regard for his workmen as had his father, and they remained with him and rendered him loyal service. When he came to this task the brewing industry was just entering upon a new period of development, involving departure from conventional methods, the introduction of new processes, and upon a far larger scale. He made every detail the object of careful investigation, and, by his industry, perseverance and liberal dealing placed his house in the forefront of American brewing establishments. The volume of business increased enormously, and the output is today one of the largest in the Long Island belt. In 1895 increased capacity was demanded, and 8200,000 was invested in additional buildings and improvements.  Mr. Huber was active in various enterprises outside the great concern in his immediate charge. He was a prominent member of the old Brewers' Association, but resigned from it about four years ago. He was builder and owner of the Brooklyn Music Hall, owner of Avoca Villa, at Bath Beach, and of the Manhattan Hotel on the Ixiulevard, was interested with Percy Williams in the Orpheum Theatre, Brooklyn, and was owner of the Hotel Metropole, in Manhattan. He was a director in the Kings County Trust Company, the First National Bank of Brooklyn, and the Williamsburgh Trust Company. He was a member of numerous social organizations, among them the Union League, the Push wick Club, the Hanover Club, the Montauk Club, the Crescent Athletic Club, the Yacht Club, the Amaranth Club, and the Riding and Driving Club, all of Brooklyn, the Order of Elks, of New York, and the Arion Singing Society of Brooklyn and Manhattan. He was an ardent lover of horses, of which he purchased only the best. His private stables were extensive and well supplied, while for business purposes he kept eighty highly bred heavy draft animals not to be surpassed in the city for size and form. To one animal he afforded really affectionate care, it being the first owned by his father, and which had long been relieved from all labor. Mr. Ruber was a man of fine social traits, and was held in affectionate regard by large circles of friends in various walks of life. He was a considerate employer and a faithful friend. His personal benefactions were many and liberal, and he withheld his effort and means from no worthy or public cause. He was married in 1886 to Miss Helen Kreusler, and of this marriage was born a daughter, Helen, now nine years of age. The large business interests with which the Huber family named have so long been associated are now under the capable direction of Joseph Huber, oldest surviving son of Otto Huber, the founder of the family, and brother of the Otto Huber, recently deceased. Joseph Huber was born in Brooklyn, September 20, 1868, and was educated in the public schools. After completing his education he entered the brewery established by his father, and gained a thorough practical knowledge of the business, from the initial manufacturing processes to the affairs of the countingroom. He and his deceased brother maintained the most intimate relations, and from the time of his attaining manhood he has been identified with the management of the business. He has now succeeded to the control, in the interest of the state, not only of the immense brewery property, but of the large banking, real estate and other properties of the family. He is a man of excellent business ability, and is highly regarded in financial circles. He is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and of numerous other social Wlies. His brothers. Charles and Max, are his talented associates in the firm.

ROBERT WELLER ~ SCHENECTADY & 176 SPRING ST. SARATOGA N.Y.

WELLER BOTTLING

George Weller, one of the best known and highly respected residents of Schenectady, N. Y., died on March nth.

Mr. Weller was 84 years of age, having been born in Cobleskill, Schoharie County, N. Y., November 1, 1826. He removed to Schenectady from Cobleskill many years ago, and had since resided here, where he was engaged in the bottling business until a few years ago. For nearly thirty years he held the office of assessor, He was a member of St, Paul's Lodge, No. 17, I. O.

O. F., St. George's Lodge, F. and A. M., St. George's Commandery, K. T., and of the Mystic Shrine, of Albany.

He is survived by one daughter, Mrs. G. Dudley Campbell, of Schenectady, and one brother, Robert Weller, of Saratoga.

1907  An important business change was announced recently in the transfer in management of the Weller Bottling Works at Saratoga Springs, one of the oldest establishments of its kind in the state.
The business was conducted for years by Robert Weller (died in 1916), who attained prominence as a bottler of ale and lager, and a maker of all kinds of soft drinks. He in turn was succeeded by his son, the late Harry J. Weller, under whose management the business still further progressed. At his death the business came under the control of Hugh Dennin, a well-known and popular young man of Saratoga Springs. Of the new company which Mr. Dennin heads, the following have been elected officers: President and treasurer, Hugh J. Dennin; vice-president, John Dennin; secretary, John D. Leary.

The plant has now been removed from the old location to larger quarters in a large brick structure. The building has been remodeled, sheds have been erected, a large refrigerator installed, a big electric sign placed in position and the place generally changed.

 
 
 
In 1860, George Weller began the manufacturing and bottling of soda water at 62 College street, remaining there until 1863, when he removed to No. 46 of the same street, his present location.
The manufactory covers an area of 60 x 190 feet, and is two stories high. He employs eight males, and his trade extends through a radius of forty miles. Mr. Weller is the only manufacturer and bottler of soda water, lemon soda, sarsaparilla and ginger ale in the county. He also makes seltzer
water.
In 1875 he became agent for the Bartholomay Brewing Company, and since then has kept a supply depot for this and Montgomery Counties. The curious yet simple bottling machine used by him for his soda water is well worth an inspection.
 
S.W.UTTER ,NASSAU  ~  GEORGE WEBER , ALBANY  ~   FITZGERALD BRO. ,TROY  N.Y.

 

















GEORGE WEBER BREWERY, 42-48 3RD AVENUE, ALBANY NEW YORK
GEORGE WEBER ~ 1858-1877  G. WEBER & SON ~ 1877-1879
GEORGE WEBER ~ 1879-1906  A.C. & G.F. WEBER ~ 1879-1906
WEBERS STAR BOTTLING WORKS ~ 1915-1920, CLOSED DOWN IN 1920

FITZGERALD BROTHERS BREWING ~ 495-511 RIVER STREET,TROY NEW YORK
JAMES LUNDY,NORTH RIVER BREWERY ~ 1852-1853  LUNDY AND INGRAM ~ 1853-1855
LUNDY AND KENNEDY ~ 1855-1857   LUNDY-DUNN & COMPANY ~ 1857-1859
DUNN AND KENNEDY ~ 1859-1866  FITZGERALD BROTHERS ~ 1866-1899
FITZGERALD BROTHERS BREWING COMPANY ~ 1899-1920 {SHUT DOWN IN 1920,OPENED IN 1933 UNTIL ABOUT 1966}

 

 

BARTELS BREWING, SYRACUSE N.Y.

BARTELS BREWING CO.  FROM SYRACUSE N.Y.

Herman Bartels was born in Richtenberg, Prussia in 1853, and learned the brewing trade there.  He came to New York in 1872, and worked in various local breweries for six years.  He then moved west and invested in the Crescent Brewing Company of Aurora, Indiana.   Bartels remained in Aurora six years, until 1884, when he sold his interest and purchased a stake in the J. Walker Brewery of Cincinnati.  Three years later he moved to Syracuse, as brewer for the Haberle Brewing Company.  He was then 37 years old, and ready to settle down.

After working six years for Haberle, Bartels purchased the seven year old Germania brewery from John Greenway in the spring of 1893.  During the next year, he changed the name to Bartels Brewing Company, and added ales and porter to the product lines.  In addition to being president of the Syracuse Brewery, Herman Bartels also became a partner in a venture to build a brewery in the Edwardsville section of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, which was named Bartels Brewing Company.  He also invested in the Monroe Brewing Company of Rochester.

The Syracuse brewery produced both ale and lager.  Early beers were Standard, Pale Crown, and an Extra Pale Stock Lager, which were later replaced by Crown Beer.  Two ales, India Pale and Old Devonshire, Porter and Bock completed the product line.  The Professor trademark is from the Edwardsville facility.  It has been suggested that Bartels had a relative who taught at a German university, and was the model for the Professor.  However, in those years an old professor or doctor was not an uncommon advertising role model.  While old age was of no concern, food purity was a very topical issue.  The Edwardsville plant offered a $5,000 warranty on beer purity and quality, and advertised a $5,000 Pure Beer.  Other Edwardsville brands were Export, Brilliant Ale, Matchless Porter, and Malt Extract.

When Herman Bartels died in 1910 at age 57, he had been a significant brewer in upstate New York.  His son and namesake had been an officer of the firm since the turn of the century, so there was continuity of ownership.  However, Prohibition was only a decade away.  The Monroe Plant closed, never to reopen, but the two Bartels breweries remained active.  The Syracuse plant stayed with the Crown and Old Devonshire names, and Edwardsville marketed Wunderbar Lager and Wyoport.

Both breweries were reopened following Repeal under the old name, but the Bartels family was no longer associated with them.  The larger Syracuse brewery ceased production in 1942, and the Edwardsville facility hung on until 1968.  The Bartels label was acquired by the Lion Brewing Company of Wilkes-Barre, and is still sold locally.  However, the golden age of Bartels brews and Bartels advertising ended long ago  (By Mike Bartels with Peter Blum )



John Greenway  Syracuse, NY 1878 - 1884  -  Mantel & Haas  Syracuse, NY 1884 - 1886  -  Germania Brewing Co. Syracuse, NY 1886 - 1893 -  Bartels Brewing Co. Syracuse, NY 1893 - 1920  -  Bartels Brewing Co. Syracuse, NY 1933 - 1942    (Compliments Tavern Trove)

 

 


ERIE BREWING  COMPANY, PA.  ~   ISENGART BREWING  ~ TROY,N.Y.

                                               












 ERIE BREWING CO., THE. general brewing business: principal office. Erie. Pa.: charter issued February 25. 1899: charter expires February 1, 1949; amount subscribed, $1,500,000; amount paid in. $150,000: authorized capital. $2,500,000: par value shares, $100; incorporators, Fred Koehler, Adolph L.Custer, Jaskson Koehler. Chas. M. Conrad. Michael Liebel. Erie. Pa.

 ERIE BREWING COMPANY, ERIE PA.   ~   ISENGARTS BREWING COMPANY, TROY NY

STEVENS & MANDEVILLE ~ ALBANY,NY   ~ GEORGE W. VAN ALSTYNE, HERKIMER, NY

              

 STEVENS & MANDEVILLE ALBANY NEW YORK HIGH SHOULDER SQUAT, THIS IS ONE OF 2 VARIANTS OF THIS BREWERS BOTTLE I HAVE. CENTER IS GEORGE W. VAN ALSTYNE FROM HERKIMER NEW YORK,  BOTH BEING SCARCE BLOBS.

Stevens and Mandeville bought out the business of G.W. Hoxsie in 1873. Hoxie had been one of the most prolific advertisers of his famous beer and bottling business. Since Hoxsie had been so widely advertised, S&M wisely kept his eye-catching monogram on their own bottles...it is the letters of HOXIE intertwined after dropping the first H and last E.

 HATHORN , SARATOGA   ~  SMITH & BOVEE , TROY

       

VERY TALL HATHORN SPRINGS BOTTLE,SARATOGA N.Y.~VERY RARE SMITH & BOVEE TROY N.Y., HAVE NOT SEEM ANOTHER OF THESE. BOVEE WAS IN BUSINESS ALONE IN THE 1900'S, FROM THE 1880,S AND THIS WOULD PREDATE THAT PERIOD 

 

Hathorn, Henry II., an American hotel-keeper, born in Greenfield, N. Y., Nov. 28, 1813; died in Saratoga Springs, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1887. He received an academic education, and, removing to Saratoga, was engaged in mercantile business from 1839 till 1849. He was among the first to take advantage of the mineral springs, and to engage in the hotel business, becoming one of the owners of the old Congress Hall, which was burned in 1865, and replaced with the present structure, opened in 1868. In the latter year, while workmen were digging for the foundation of a business block, a new spring was discovered, which has since been known as the Hathorn Spring, and owned and managed by Mr. Hathorn and his family. He was supervisor of Saratoga four years, elected sheriff of the county in 1853 and 1862, and member of Congress in 1872-'74.

CAPT. T. MILLS ~ OSWEGO,N.Y.  AUGUST STOEHR LAGER ~ MANCHESTER,N.H.

 

 SOME OF MY LATEST, CAPT. T. MILLS A BOTTLER FOR BARTHOLOMAY ROCHESTER (SEE ABOVE) A RARE BOTTLE. ALSO A VERY HARD TO FIND AUGUST STOEHR MILWAUKEE LAGER FROM MANCHESTER N.H.

Captain Theodore Mills, son of William G. Mills, was born in Barton, Tioga county. New York, July 21, 1850. He attended the district school on Talmadge Hill and the Wav- erly high school. For many years after leaving school he followed farming for his occupation.  He started in the business of manufacturing  soda water in Waverly, New York, and in  March, 1883, purchased the interests of his  partner, Mr. Barlow, and admitted to the firm Silas Wolcott, under the firm name of Mills &  Wolcott. In March, 1884. M. D. O'Brien became partner of Mr. Mills, under the firm  name of Mills & O'Brien. Subsecuently the  business was incorporated under the name of  Capt. T.Mills Bottling Works, ..for which Captain Mills is president, general manager and  principal owner. In politics Captain Mills is  a Republican. In religion he is a Methodist.  Captain Mills married, December 18, 1872, Phebe, daughter of Peter and Huldah Lewis, of New Jersey. Captain and Mrs. Mills, have
no children.

SCHWARZENBACH ~ HORNELLSVILLE


TWO OF MY LATEST FINDS, A VERY HARD TO GET SCHWARZENBACH  BREWING COMPANY ~ HORNELLSVILLE NEW YORK WITH MATCHED TOP AND EMBOSSED EAGLE ON BARRELL ,THIS BREWERY STARTED OUT IN GERMANIA, PA. AND THE BOSTON LOOP TOPPED BOTTLE ON THE RIGHT IS FROM THERE,  BOTH ARE PERFECT.

SCHWARZENBACH BREWING COMPANY, 113 FRANKLIN STREET HORNELLSVILLE NEW YORK
SCHWARZENBACH BREWING CO. ~ 1895-1920  {ERIE AND FRANKLIN STREETS}
CLOSED IN 1920 AND REOPENED IN 1934-1964 AS HORNELL BREWING COMPANY


 THE FREDRICK HINKEL BREWING COMPANY

A VERY HARD TO COME BY, FRED HINKEL SPARKLING LAGER ALBANY NEW YORK PONY IN MINT SHAPE, BOSTON MASS. BRANCH IN HONEY AMBER, PONY SARATOGA BRANCH WITH BALTIMORE LOOP AND AQUA SARATOGA BRANCH, ALL ARE SCARCE AND JUST DO NOT COME UP VERY OFTEN ANYMORE.

 

Hinkel brewery Products:


 


Bavarian Beer  1884 - 1920 Export Beer  1884 - 1920   Hinckel Ale  1884 - 1920  Hinckel Lager Beer  1884 - 1920  Kyffhauser Beer  1884 - 1920

 

 FREDERICK HINCKEL.

The record of a man's life is the most enduring memorial that can be erected to his memory. The story of his efforts to reach a place among the honored and successful men of his time must always remain as a valuable and inspiiing example, whose far-reaching influence and ennobling effect testify in strongest eloquence to the worth of well-directed energies. Especial stress may well be placed upon such a life history when the achievement has been effected from the humblest of beginnings; in short, when the man who accomplished such a work is, in the strongest seme, a self-made man.

Frederick Hinckel, one of Albany's honored German citizens, was such a man. He came of that sturdy, staunch, and honored class from whose members Albany has gained vastly in enterprise, industry, and good citizenship. He honored alike the race from which he sprang and the community with which his life labors were identified, and towards the development of whose prosperous interests his ambition was directed. He was born in Germany, October 29, 1832, and in his youth passed through a rugged experience which while bringing, mayhap, a volume of denials and struggling efforts, surely established the foundation of self-reliance and determined energy that worked out the successful purposes of his later life. He began the battle of existence a poor boy, but he set before his feet the resolve to waste no opportunity that might help him along the pathway to success. German thrift and industrious application, joined with ambitious ardor, soon bore wholesome and abundant fruit. In 1857, Mr. Hinckel founded in a small way the business of beer brewing, and once with his ground sure beneath him, he pressed vigorously and confidently onward. He looked to become ultimately a prominent figure among the brewers of his time, and his determination naturally and necessarily wrought out that end. His progress and success were rapid. ? Integrity and diligence were the watchwords of his career, and by the light of their guidance and counsel he moved forward, winning not only prosperity as a manufacturer, but enduring and substantial worth as a citizen. He began in 1857 as a brewer, in a very humble capacity; in 1881, when he died, he was the owner of one of the best equipped, as well as one of the costliest breweries in the country. His business had grown to such proportions that more than a hundred men were required to conduct it, while in far-reaching details it may be noted that his commercial transactions extended over the entire State of New York. Unhappily for him the last summons came to him just as he had reached the culmination of his ambition, in the successful inauguration of the great enterprise that still bears his name. He died October 29, 1881, and in that year the present Hinckel Brewery was completed. He saw, however, that he had won the triumph he had worked for, and that was to him a proud consolation. He passed away, if not full of years (for he was still in the strength of vigorous manhood), assuredly full of respect and esteem as a citizen. As an employer he was more of a friend to his people than a master, and thus it was that he held in their affections a warm place. Many of his servitors boasted with pardonable pride that they had remained with him during the entire period of his business career. Mr. Hinckel was fully abreast the age as a citizen of public spirit, and untiringly urged and assisted any project having for its object the promotion of the popular welfare. He was a member the community could ill spare, and one whose absence will continue to be felt for some time to come. His influence and example live, however, and they will to much worthy purpose albeit their author and builder has laid down the burden of life for ever.

KINSELLA & HENNESSEY, ALBANY ~ FRED ROSHIRT,SCHODAC CENTRE ~ THOMAS MCGOVERN,ALBANY

                  

CARNRICK BRO.  ~ TROY       S.C. PALMER ~ WASHINGTON D.C.       A.C. & G.F. WEBER ~ ALBANY N.Y.

 

                  

                     

CARNRICK BROTHERS TROY  N.Y. ~ S.C. PALMER WASHINGTON D.C. (A FAVORITE) GEORGE WEBER WEISS BEER ALBANY N.Y. 

Samuel C. Palmer Washington, D.C.

Samuel Claxton Palmer was born 1839 in Washington DC. He and Robert M. Green took over the Union Bottling Works at 57 Greene Street Georgetown (Washington) in 1872. Prior to that Palmer was a bookkeeper. I assume that his address of 57 Greene street in Georgetown changed to 1224 29th Street in 1881 (i.e. that wasn't a different building, but was a re-numbering due to the renaming of "Greene street" to "29th street").     Palmer was listed as an agent for the Joseph Schlitz Brewing Co at 615 D SW.
Palmer's bottling plant at 1066 32nd street NW, which was later designated as 1066 Wisconsin Avenue after a street name change, had previously been a fire house
Company Names, addresses, dates:    Palmer & Green, 57 Greene Georgetown (1872-1874)    S. C. Palmer, 57 Greene Georgetown (1875-1880)
S. C. Palmer, 1224 29th NW (1881-1892)      S. C. Palmer, 615 D SW (1888-1898)   Samuel C Palmer agent for Joseph Schlitz Brewing Co, 615 D SW (1892-1897)   Samuel C. Palmer, 1066 32d street NW (1899-1907)    Samuel C. Palmer, 1066 Wis Ave NW (1908-1911)   S.C. Palmer Co, 1066 Wis Ave NW (1912-1940)   Palmer Brand, Washington DC

 

GEORGE WEBER BREWERY, 42-48 3RD AVENUE, ALBANY NEW YORK
GEORGE WEBER ~ 1858-1877  G. WEBER & SON ~ 1877-1879  GEORGE WEBER ~ 1879-1906  A.C. & G.F. WEBER ~ 1879-1906
WEBERS STAR BOTTLING WORKS ~ 1915-1920, CLOSED DOWN IN 1920


BIBBEY & FERGUSON    GLENS FALLS  N.Y. 

 BIBBEY & FERGUSON VARIANTS FROM GLENS FALLS N.Y.

6 VARIANTS OF BIBBEY & FERGUSON BOTTLES, THE TOP LEFT CIRCULAR EMBOSSED AND THE AMBER PONY LOWER RIGHT ARE VERY HARD TO GET

BIBBEY AND FERGUSON

The southeast corner of South and Glen Street which has been the site of a grocery store for more than 100 years.  The first occupancy of this corner was a blacksmith shop conducted by Abraham Haviland in 1787.  In 1828, Henry Ferguson, a grocer at Halfmoon in Saratoga County, moved to Glens Falls and with Henry Philo, father of the surveyor I have mentioned who won the prize for the best name submitted for Hotel Ruliff, opened a store at the upper end of the village.  They purchased the lot at Glen and South Street from Mr. and Mrs. Francis Fitts for $100.

Six years later, Mr. Philo sold his interest in the real estate business to his partner for $500.  Still later he sold his interest in the business to Mr. Ferguson.  About the years 1840?41, Mr. Ferguson moved off an old building which had been used as a watch repair and jewelry shop by A. A. Holdridge and erected what was considered in those days a fine three?story brick building to be used as a store. The old blacksmith was also moved back and a two?story wooden dwelling was erected on its site and was the home of the Ferguson family.

In after years, Mr. Buswell had a locksmith shop in the front room of the building. After the death of Mr. Ferguson, the business was conducted by his son, George Ferguson.  On the south side of the store building was an open stairway leading to the second story.  Among the occupants in the fifties was Justice of the Peace Hiram Philo, justice and surveyor; Mr. Van Tassel, and some years later, Dr. R. J. Eddy.  At the rear of Mr. Ferguson?s store stood an old hotel built about 1868.  It was run by W. H. McNutt in 1875.  Later, Hill and McCabe had at Nos. 8 and 10 a meat market and grocery story in the building.  A. Oliver had a shoe shop at No. 6 and at 10, John Murphy and Co. also had a meat market.

During the decade of 1872, Mr. Ferguson sold his property on the corner to Mr. Henry Crandall, who enlarged the building and added the present stores to what is now called the Crandall Block.

In 1896, Mr. Ferguson, who had continued his business on the corner after selling the property, announced his intention to move.  Smith and Horton then obtained the lease and Mr. Ferguson moved to West Street.  The old hotel, Nos. 8 and 10 on South Street, which had been a hotel, meat market and grocery for so many years, was torn down in 1882 and Mr. Crandall built the present three?story building

 

Self made man perishes

Leonard Bibbey, 60, died from pneumonia Jan. 31, 2013 at his home in Fort Edward. He was a native of England and came to Glens Falls as a boy. He later started a small bottling works out of which has grown the firm of Bibbey and Ferguson brewers.

Bibbey lived in Glens Falls until 1890 when, with several others, he went to Fort Edward and purchased the John R. Durkee Brewing Co. which he has since conducted under his personal direction.

Bibbey was a self-made man and charitably inclined. He was widely known as one of the leading horsemen of this area, having owned some of the best horses in the state. The Bibbey Hose Company was named in his honor. He is survived by his wife, one son, Walter Bibbey and a daughter, Mrs. W.L.R. Durkee. (By Jean Hadden )


 BIBBEY & FERGUSON VARIANTS FROM GLENS FALLS N.Y.

6 VARIANTS OF BIBBEY & FERGUSON BOTTLES, THE TOP LEFT CIRCULAR EMBOSSED AND THE AMBER PONY LOWER RIGHT ARE VERY HARD TO GET

BIBBEY AND FERGUSON

The southeast corner of South and Glen Street which has been the site of a grocery store for more than 100 years.  The first occupancy of this corner was a blacksmith shop conducted by Abraham Haviland in 1787.  In 1828, Henry Ferguson, a grocer at Halfmoon in Saratoga County, moved to Glens Falls and with Henry Philo, father of the surveyor I have mentioned who won the prize for the best name submitted for Hotel Ruliff, opened a store at the upper end of the village.  They purchased the lot at Glen and South Street from Mr. and Mrs. Francis Fitts for $100.

Six years later, Mr. Philo sold his interest in the real estate business to his partner for $500.  Still later he sold his interest in the business to Mr. Ferguson.  About the years 1840?41, Mr. Ferguson moved off an old building which had been used as a watch repair and jewelry shop by A. A. Holdridge and erected what was considered in those days a fine three?story brick building to be used as a store. The old blacksmith was also moved back and a two?story wooden dwelling was erected on its site and was the home of the Ferguson family.

In after years, Mr. Buswell had a locksmith shop in the front room of the building. After the death of Mr. Ferguson, the business was conducted by his son, George Ferguson.  On the south side of the store building was an open stairway leading to the second story.  Among the occupants in the fifties was Justice of the Peace Hiram Philo, justice and surveyor; Mr. Van Tassel, and some years later, Dr. R. J. Eddy.  At the rear of Mr. Ferguson?s store stood an old hotel built about 1868.  It was run by W. H. McNutt in 1875.  Later, Hill and McCabe had at Nos. 8 and 10 a meat market and grocery story in the building.  A. Oliver had a shoe shop at No. 6 and at 10, John Murphy and Co. also had a meat market.

During the decade of 1872, Mr. Ferguson sold his property on the corner to Mr. Henry Crandall, who enlarged the building and added the present stores to what is now called the Crandall Block.

In 1896, Mr. Ferguson, who had continued his business on the corner after selling the property, announced his intention to move.  Smith and Horton then obtained the lease and Mr. Ferguson moved to West Street.  The old hotel, Nos. 8 and 10 on South Street, which had been a hotel, meat market and grocery for so many years, was torn down in 1882 and Mr. Crandall built the present three?story building

 

Self made man perishes

Leonard Bibbey, 60, died from pneumonia Jan. 31, 2013 at his home in Fort Edward. He was a native of England and came to Glens Falls as a boy. He later started a small bottling works out of which has grown the firm of Bibbey and Ferguson brewers.

Bibbey lived in Glens Falls until 1890 when, with several others, he went to Fort Edward and purchased the John R. Durkee Brewing Co. which he has since conducted under his personal direction.

Bibbey was a self-made man and charitably inclined. He was widely known as one of the leading horsemen of this area, having owned some of the best horses in the state. The Bibbey Hose Company was named in his honor. He is survived by his wife, one son, Walter Bibbey and a daughter, Mrs. W.L.R. Durkee. (By Jean Hadden )

 BEVERWYCK, SARATOGA  ~  WM. H. WAGAR, BALLSTON SPA  ~  B. J. GOLDSMITH, SARATOGA

 RARE BEVERWYCK BOTTLING WORKS SARATOGA SPRINGS NY ,RARE WM. H. WAGAR BALLSTON SPA,NY AN ANOTHER RARE ONE..B.J.GOLDSMITH SARATOGA NY

 B.J.GOLDSMITH

B.J. Goldsmith, Dealer in Fine Groceries, Wines, Liquors and Cigars, No. 372 Broadway.—This business was established by Mr. Goldsmith in 1865, since which period he has built up an extensive and influential patronage not only in Saratoga, but also in the adjoining counties. Mr. Goldsmith imports direct from the most celebrated European houses and supplies all the principal hotels in the town. His store is spacious and is fully stocked with a superior assortment of fancy and staple groceries, wines, liquors and cigars, which are unrivalled for quality and excellence, and have no superiors in this country. The wines include all the famous champagnes in the market, the clarets of J. Calvet & Co., Barton & Guestier, Clossma & Co., etc., while the brandies are from the noted houses of Hennessey & Co., Martell, J. Rohins & Co., and J. S. Dulary & Co. All kinds of the finest groceries are to be found here, all quoted at extremely low prices. A specialty is made of cigars, both imported and domestic, the leading brand being "La Tntegudad," which is unsurpassed for flavor and superiority. ln the selection of cigars, Mr. Goldsmith has had an experience of thirty years, and feels confident that smokers will find it to their advantage to favor hfm with a call. ln all departments of his business. Mr. Goldsmith has always successfully aimed to give entire satisfaction to his numerous patrons, and is highly esteemed by the community for his enterprise, business capacity, and integrity. He was born in Poland, but has resided in the United States for the last thirty-two vear

 

B.J. Goldsmith, son of T.D. and Martha Goldsmith, b. Poland, s. 1863, Tobacconist, 376 Broadway.

 

Goldsmith, Benjamin Judah was born in Russia, Poland, March 15, 1840. He came to the United States in 1857, settling first in New York,. where he learned the cigar maker's trade. He remained in that city until 1863, when he removed to Saratoga Springs, and was engaged in the manufacture of cigars there from 1865 to 1873. In the latter year he established himself in the wine, liquor and cigar business. Mr. Goldsmith is a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Saratoga Springs. N. Y. He has been twice married; his first wife was Mary J. Howe. who died in 1872, leaving one daughter, Nina; and his second wife was Eliza Cohn, and they have one son, Irving Goldsmith. 

1906 ~  The Hudson Valley Construction Co., of Troy, have secured the contract for the erection of an Arcade building at Saratoga Springs for B. J. Goldsmith, to cost $80,000.

 

WILLIAM WAGAR ~ BALLSTON SPA NEW YORK  ~ JULY 27TH 1895 UNTIL NOVEMBER 1ST 1976

BEVERWYCK BREWING COMPANY 

Beverwyck Brewing Company, North Ferry Street, M. N. Nolan, President and Treasurer.—In the production of lager beer the achievements of Albany's principal brewers are worthy of special mention in this review of the commerce and industries of the city. At the present day lager beer is rapidly becoming the national beverage of the American people. When pure, manufactured of the best materials and by the most improved processes, beer is acknowledged by physicians and medical authorities to have excellent tonic and strengthening properties. A prominent and reliable corporation in Albany, engaged in the production of superior lager beer, is that of the popular Beverwyck Brewing Company, whose offices and brewery are centrally located on North Ferry Street, This brewery was founded by Messrs. M. N. Nolan, T. J. Quimi and M. Schrodt, and duly incorporated under the laws of the state of New York with a paid-up capital of $150,000. Mr. Quinn died in 1878, and the business is now controlled by Mr. M. N. Nolan, the president and treasurer, and Mr. M. Schrodt, the general manager, and August Kampfer, secretary. The brewery, ice house, etc., ^re very superior buildings, fully supplied with all modern apparatus, machinery and appliances known to the trade. The pumps, refrigerators, immense vats, baudelet cooler, boilers, etc., and in fact all its superior equipments are greatly admired by experts and practical brewers. Fifty experienced brewers and operators are employed, and the machinery is driven by a powerful steam-engine. The capacity of the brewery is 70,000 barrels, and during the past year the Beverwyck Brewing Company sold 60,000 barrels in Albany and its vicinity. The lager beer brewed here is unrivalled for quality, purity, flavor and excellence, and has no superior in Albany or elsewhere, while the brewery is a model of neatness and cleanliness. The beer of this famous brewery is preferred by thousands to any other lager, and the demand for it is steadily increasing in Albany and the neighboring cities. Messrs. Nolan and Schrodt, the officers, are recognized authorities with regard to everything appertaining to brewing, and are highly esteemed in business circles for their enterprise and integrity. Mr. Nolan is one of our public-spirited citizens, and has Deen elected twice mayor of Albany and also has been in Congress for one term. In conclusion, we would observe that the lager beer brewed by this company has ever met with the approbation of the best judges, while physicians recommend it as a thoroughly pure and healthy beverage, devoid of adulteration or deleterious elements.

BEVERWYCK BREWING



































SOME NICE ADVERTISING FROM ALBANY N.Y. BREWER "BEVERWYCK"
"SARATOGA SELTZER SPRING CO." ~ MURPHY BRO. WEISS BEER SYRACUSE

HERE IS MY QUART SIZE SARATOGA SELTZER,THESE ARE GETTING HARDER AND HARDER TO GET HOLD OF IN BLOB FORM, SARATOGA SELTZER SPRING WITH ANCHOR EMBOSSED. THE ONLY SELTZER SPRING IN THE U.S.A. 

ON THE RIGHT IS A VERY SCARCE MURPHY BROTHERS WEISS BEER FROM SYRACUSE NEW YORK. I AM TOLD BY A SYRACUSE COLLECTOR THAT THIS BREWERY WAS ONLY IN BUSINESS A SHORT TIME, I AM STILL SEARCHING FOR INFORMATION ON IT. SUPER EXAMPLE WITH ORIGINAL BAIL AND ATTIC MINT. MANUFACTURED BY CLYDE GLASS WORKS,CLYDE N.Y.

Clyde Glass Works, Clyde, NY, ca. 1870-1882

SARATOGA SELTZER SPRING CO.

“Saratoga Seltzer Spring Co.,” proprietors. Perhaps no one of the springs gratifies the curious more than the Seltzer.

It is situated about 150 feet from the High Rock Spring, but, although in such close proximity thereto, its water is entirely different, thus illustrating the wonderful extent and capacity of nature's subterranean laboratory.

Peculiarities.

The owners of the Seltzer Spring have an ingenious contrivance for exhibiting the flow of the water and its gas. It consists of a glass tube, three feet in height and fifteen inches in diameter, nicely adjusted to the mouth of the spring, through which the sweet, clear, sparkling water gushes in a steady volume, while, faster than the water, bubble up the glittering globules of pure carbonic acid gas.

History.

The spring was discovered several years ago, but only recently was it tubed so as to be available. The tube extends down thirty-four feet to the surface of the foundation rock. The crevice in the rock through which the water issues is about twelve inches by five. The column of water above the rock is thirty-seven feet high. The flow of gas is abundant and constant, but every few minutes, as the watchful visitor will observe, there is a momentary ebullition of an extraordinary quantity which causes the water in the tube to boil over the rim. When the sunshine falls upon the fountain it presents a beautiful appearance.

This is a genuine Seltzer spring. The character of the water is almost identical with that of the celebrated Nassau Spring of Germany, which is justly esteemed so delicious by the natives of the “Fatherland.” Our German citizens, with their usual sagacity, have discovered this fact, and the consumption of the water by them is daily on the increase.

The importance of this American Seltzer Spring will be somewhat appreciated by the reader, when informed of the fact that nearly two millions of stone jugs, holding one quart each, of the Nassau Seltzer are annually exported from Germany.  Properties. The water of this spring is very pleasant to the taste, being slightly acidulous and saline, but much milder than that of the other Saratoga springs. It is an agreeable and wholesome beverage. When mixed with still wines, etc., it adds the peculiar flavor only to be derived from a pure, natural Seltzer. It enlivens them and gives them the character of sparkling wines.Saratoga possesses numerous objects of interest for the German population, surpassing even the famous Spas of Europe, and the discovery of the Seltzer will doubtless attract large numbers of this intelligent and genial people. The analyses of the   Saratoga and the German Seltzer springs are almost identical. No people in the world, perhaps, consider a summer's excursion to a watering place so absolutely essential to life, physically, dietetically, morally and politically considered, as the Germans, and we are happy to know that they are beginning to realize the attractions of Saratoga.

This spring is close to High Rock Spring and in the neighborhood of the Star and Empire. Although in such close proximity thereto, its water is entirely different, thus illustrating the wonderful extent and capacity of nature's subterranean laboratory.

The spring was discovered several years ago, but only recently was it tubed so as to be available. The tube extends down thirty-four feet to the surface of the foundation rock. The crevice in the rock through which the water issues is about twelve inches by five, and the column of the water above the rock is thirty-seven feet high.

This is the only Seltzer spring in this country. The character of the water is almost identical with that of the celebrated Nassau Spring of Germany, which is justly esteemed so delicious by the natives of the "Fatherland."

The water is very pleasant to the taste, being slightly acidulous and saline, but much milder than that of the other Saratoga springs. It is an agreeable and wholesome beverage. When mixed with still wines, etc., it adds the peculiar flavor only to be derived from a pure, natural Seltzer, enlivening them and giving them the character of sparkling wines.

These are among the more celebrated of the springs, but there are a number of others of more or less value that may be briefly noticed

L.H. HOUSE, TROY N.Y.    ~   AMERICAN SODA FOUNTAIN CO.

 

VERY SCARCE L.H. HOUSE FROM TROY N.Y. YOU DON'T SEE THESE FROM TROY.. AND NICE AMERICAN SODA FOUNTAIN BLOB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 1832 John Matthews of NYC and John Lippincott of Philadelphia began manufacturing soda fountains. Both added innovations that improved soda-fountain equipment, and the industry expanded as retail outlets installed newer, better fountains. Other pioneering manufacturers were Alvin Puffer, Andrew Morse, Gustavus Dows, and James Tufts. In 1891 the four largest manufacturers—Tufts, Puffer, Lippincott, and Matthews—formed the American Soda Fountain Company, which was a trust designed to monopolize the industry. The four manufacturers continued to produce and market fountains under their company names. The trust controlled prices and forced some smaller manufacturers out of business.

WELZ & ZERWECK'S HIGH GROUND BREWERY~ BROOKLYN COOKE & MEUTSCH, ALBANY ~ ISAAC MERKEL, SARANAC LAKE

 

 

WELZ & ZERWECK'S Brewery was on Myrtle & Wyckoff Avenue. In the corner building was the High Ground Hotel & resturant. John WELZ & Charles ZERWECK were the partners forming the firm of WELZ & ZERWECK'S


In 1874, Jacob Marquardt hired Charles Zerwick to be the bewmeister of his brewery. In Three years later, Charles Zerwick married Amelia Welz, daughter of John Welz, the owner of the Welz Brewery on the southeast corner of Myrtle and Wyckoff avenues in Ridgewood. He continued to work for Marquardt.In May 1878, a fire destroyed the Marquardt Brewery. It took months to rebuild the brewery and get it back in operation. During this interim period, John Welz offered Charles Zerwick the position of brewmeister at his brewery and Zerwick accepted.

Cook & Meutsch, 1875. Shows them at 129 Fourth avenue in Albany

THIS COOK & MEUTSCH IS A VERY RARE BOTTLE AND ONE I HAVE NOT SEEN WHOLE BEFORE,AT THIS POINT IT IS THE ONLY EXAMPLE ANYONE HAS BEEN ABLE TO SHOW ME.

ISAAC MERKEL BREWING COMPANY, SARANAC LAKE N.Y., ALSO A PRETTY HARD TO GET BOTTLE WITH "BOSS LAGER" EMBOSSED

ISAAC MERKEL & SONS OWNED A BREWERY IN SARANAC LAKE, N.Y. AND ALSO RAN A LIQUER DISTRIBUTOR IN PLATTSBURG. THEY OPENED A DEPT STORE UNDER THE SAME NAME, LATER SELLING THE SARANAC BREWERY TO FRED STARK.

 INDIANA BREWING ASSOCIATION

THE INDIANA BREWING ASSOCIATION PICTURE BLOB WITH BALTIMORE LOOP TOP . GREAT PICTURE  BLOB FROM MARION INDIANA    

INDIANA BREWING ASSOCIATION  

Between the years of 1900 and 1950, three companies dominated the brewing industry in Marion, Indiana. The Indiana Brewing Association was the first of these three and it was rather successful during the years before prohibition. Kiley Brewing Company renovated the buildings that were left behind by the Indiana Brewing Association (IBA) and began a profitable business. Lastly, the Fox Deluxe Brewing Company bought out Kiley Brewing Company and continued producing alcoholic beverages with great success until 1949. The three companies, Indiana Brewing Association, Kiley Brewing Association, and Fox Deluxe Brewing Company each contributed to Marion’s success and survival during the early-to-mid 1900’s. In February 1897, the newly organized Indiana Brewing Association constructed a brewing complex at 1550 Railroad Avenue, which is today 525 Lincoln Boulevard. The three men who were responsible for the organization of the IBA are John N. C. Woefel, James S. Corbett, and Thomas Mahaffey. John Woefel was appointed secretary and general manager of the association.  James Corbett came to Marion in 1879 on business when he met and married Nora Kiley. He and his wife remained in Marion and James was later appointed president of the Indiana Brewing Association. Thomas Mahaffey was appointed treasurer of the Indiana Brewing Association and soon after married Katherine Kiley.  The brewery cost 100,000 dollars to build but by September of 1900, the company had increased its profits to 200,000 dollars. The company was valued at 350,000 dollars by 1901 and employed fifty to sixty men. The brewery’s annual capacity was approximately 150,000 barrels of three distinctively advertised products. These three include Budweiser, Bavarian, and Wiener Beer. By 1915 the organizers realized the possibility of national prohibition and decided that it would be best to liquidate the company’s assets. A federal beverage tax was placed on all the left over barrels of alcohol in the company. The company officials, knowing the tax could not be paid by selling the beer, forfeit the intoxicating brew to the IRS who in turn decided to dump the alcohol into the Mississinewa River. Eighty-five year old Philip Kiley recalled the scene. “…the river foamed up as the beer was dumped…people came…with buckets and dipped the beer out of the river while others got on their hands and knees and drank from the river. Still others were swimming in it. It was a sight to see.” After this incident, and as a result of prohibition, all the buildings of the brewery were sold to the Burge Meat Packing Company. The Indiana Brewing Association was a success and it brought business to Marion, but the inevitable prohibition put the brewery out of business. After the prohibition era, Philip Kiley and Robert Kiley saw an opportunity to reopen what had been the Indiana Brewing Association and regain the family business. The two men purchased the old buildings from the meat packing company and completely refurbished them. The new organization was named the Kiley Brewing Company and it began operation in April of 1934.  A new name was given to the principle beverage that was to be sold by the Kiley Company. George W. Deegan chose the name “Patrick Henry.” Deegan states in the local newspaper “ ‘Patrick Henry’ is indicative of personal liberty, and satisfies their desire for a distinctively American name.” Unlike the Indiana Brewing Association, Kiley Brewing Company had a maximum capacity of 300,000 barrels of alcohol; however, the most it ever produced was 260,000 barrels. The company employed between one hundred and one hundred and twenty persons, which is twice the amount of the Indiana Brewing Company. In 1936, production reached its pinnacle. High sales, high profits, and high salaries characterized the Kiley Company. Kiley eventually expanded its sales to Chicago but later complications and developments became causes for withdrawal from arrangements in Chicago. World War II loomed over Europe and soon much-needed materials were becoming increasingly difficult to acquire.  This financial pressure was enough to persuade Robert Kiley that the time, price, and prospective buyer were ideal for the sellout. The Kiley Brewing Company was an economic foundation in Marion and its financial success led to Marion’s survival. The Peter Fox Brewing Company of Chicago bought out the Kiley Brewing Company and decided to leave the same management in the company. They took over the Marion plant in 1941 and renamed it Fox Deluxe Brewing Company. The Fox Company was not much different from the Kiley plant. It operated at approximately the same employee and production level as the Kiley Company. Its main products were Patrick Henry Malt Liquor, Fox Deluxe Beer, and Silver Fox Premium Beer, which were shipped by boxcar to other states such as Texas and Iowa. Success in this company was not easily overlooked. In fact, there were three shifts of one hundred to two hundred men because sales were so good. In late 1941 and 1942, Fox Deluxe was paying its workers eighty-five cents per hour for their labor in their brewery. The Fox plant was considered to be a very good place to work. Production began to decline in Marion in late 1949 when the company decided to move the shipping of large quantities of their product to their Chicago plant. Without warning, the plant was closed in 1949, near the end of December. The buildings were eventually sold. Over time, they have been occupied by different storage, trucking, and salvage companies. Of the three brewing companies, each occupying the same plant, the Fox Deluxe Brewing Company experienced the most success and brought to Marion more business than either of the other two companies.

  

ADAM SCHEIDT BREWING CO. ~ NORRISTOWN PENNSYLVANIA

ANOTHER GREAT BLOB I JUST GOT, ADAM SCHEIDT BREWING FROM NORRISTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA WITH LOTS OF EMBOSSING,SWEET!! 

ADAM SCHEIDT, a well known business man, president and general manager of the Adam Scheidt brewing company of Norristown, Pennsylvania, is a son of Adam and Kathrina (Pflueger) Scheidt, and was born in Bavaria, Germany, on February 14, 1854. His father was a miller and grain dealer in the early part of his life, but latterly engaged in the lime business, which he continued until his death, on April 9, 1894. At the time of his death he was in his eighty-sixth year. He was a man of considerable means, and was a member of the Lutheran church, in which he held the office of elder. His' marriage resulted in the birth of ten children, seven sons and three daughters.

Adam Scheidt received his education in the public schools of Bavaria, and learned the trade of cooper and brewer. This trade he followed until he reached the age of twenty-one years. At this time he entered the military service of the German army and served three years. In April, 1878, he left his native country and emigrated to the United States. Shortly after his arrival he located in Norristown, and became associated with his brother Charles in the brewing business. As soon as he familiarized himself with the language of his adopted country, he became a partner and half owner in the brewing business, which was operated under the title of C. & A. Scheidt. This partnership continued until October 7, 1884, at which date his brother died. During the following year Mr. Scheidt continued the sole conductor of the business, and when the interest of his brother in the enterprise was sold, it was purchased by Mr. Scheidt, and continued under his control down to October 7, 1890. At this latter date the business was changed to a stock company, under the name of the Adam Scheidt Brewing company, of which Mr. Scheidt became president and general manager, Michael G. McGrath treasurer, and Edward F. Curren, secretary. A board of directors was organized, consisting of William Little, Patrick Curren, P. McGrath, J. U. Cassel and Amos M. Schultz.

The brewery of the Adam Scheidt Brew- j ing company is a very commodious structure, and has a capacity of sixty thousand barrels. In 1891 the brewery and bottling establishment of A. R. Cox, at the corner of Main and Markley streets, Norristown, was | purchased and made an auxiliary business. The facilities of the Adam Scheidt Brewing company are greater than any other in the '. county, and all kinds of beer, porter, ale, stout and carbonated beverages are marketed.

Aside from the brewing business, Mr. j  Scheidt is a stockholder in the Albertson Trust company, the Norristown Title, Trust and Safe Deposit company, the First National bank, the Norristown Steel works, the Citizens' Passenger Street Railway company, and various other business industries. Mr. Scheidt is a Republican in politics and a member of several fraternal orders.

On January 28, 1881, Mr. Scheidt was united in marriage with Rosa I. Hindenach, a daughter of Jacob Hindenach, of Norristown, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Scheidt have six children: Adam, jr., Harry, Anna, Nina, Helen and Catharine.

Mr. Scheidt is a man of very active and courageous business propensities, and has succeeded in establishing a large and growing business. He is a man of good executive ability and persistent efforts, and ranks with the most enterprising citizens of the county.

 Adam Scheidt Brewing Co.
Norriston, PA (1866 - 1975)   Moeschlin Bros. Norristown, PA 1866 - ???  John C. White & Co. Norristown, PA ??? - 1870  Charles Scheidt Norristown, PA 1870 - 1878
C. & A. Scheidt Norristown, PA 1878 - 1884  Adam Scheidt Norristown, PA 1884 - 1890  Adam Scheidt Brewing Co. Norristown, PA 1890 - 1960  Valley Forge Brewing Co. Norristown, PA 1960 - 1963
C. Schmidt & Sons, Inc. Norristown, PA 1963 - 1975    Trade Names for the Prior Brewery at 151 West Marshall & Barbadoes Streets, Norristown, PA:  Moeschlin Bros. (Marshall Street at the Stoney Creek) 1866-18?? John C. White & Co. 18??-circa 1870 Charles Scheidt (Marshall & Barbadoes Streets) 1870-1878 C. & A. Scheidt 1878-1884 Adam Scheidt 1884-1890 Adam Scheidt Brewing Co., Plant 1 (through prohibition as L-125) 1890-1920 Brewery operations shut down by National Prohibition in 1920  Products:  Lotos Beer  1930 - 1934 Scheldt's Bock  1933 - 1935 Scheldt's Beer  1933 - 1935
Old Bremer Beer  1933 - 1936 Valley Forge Special Near Beer  1933 - 1936 Scheidt's Ale  1933 - 1937 W?rzburger Type Beer  1933 - 1937 Rams Head Ale  1933 - 1960 Valley Forge Ale  1934 - 1939
Valley Forge Stout  1935 - 1947 Valley Forge Bock  1936 - 1960 Valley Forge Porter  1937 - 1959 Valley Forge Beer  1940 - 1960 Prior Beer  1945 - 1960 Double Stout  ?? - ?? Twentieth Century Ale  ?? - ??

 

G.B. SEELY'S SON ~ NYC
A NATURALLY TURNING AMETHYST QUART BLOB FROM NYC SHOWING A BAR SCENE WITH LOTS OF BOTTLES ON BAR AND IN BACKGROUND, MANGANESE IN GLASS MIX WHEN ALLOWED OVER TIME TO BE EXPOSED TO SUN LIGHT (ULTRA VIOLET) WILL TURN GLASS THIS COLOR. MANY ARE BEING ARTIFICIALLY TREATED NOWADAYS, THIS ONE IS NOT.
 
GEORGE SEELY was born March 27, 1837. His parents were Edward and Julia Ann (Satterly) Seely. Mr. Seely attained his education at the district school and Old Chester Academy. He now occupies the homestead in which his grandfather and great-grandfather lived. The house is now over one hundred and fifty years old. George Seely was united in marriage to Miss Helen M. Butler, of Rochester, N.Y., September 17, 1868. Their one child, Gaylord B., was born March 3, 1874. Mr. and Mrs. Seeley are members of the Chester Presbyterian Church and Mr. Seely is a member of the Chester Grange No. 984. In politics he is a republican and has served the town in various offices. His wife is a member of the board of managers of the Home for Aged Women of Middletown, N.Y.

The following communication was received from the Clerk of the Common Council:

(In Common Council.)

Resolved, That permission be and the same is hereby given to G. B. Seeley's Son to lay a winch iron pipe along West Fifteenth street, from No. 311 to No. 319 West Fifteenth street, for the purpose of conducting water from a private well at No. 319, as shown upon the accompanying diagram, upon payment to the City as compensation for the privilege such sum as may be specttW by the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund, provided said G. B. Seeley's Son shall stipulate wi;« the Commissioner of Public Works to save the City harmless from any loss or damage occasions by the exercise of the privilege hereby granted, either during the progress or subsequent to the completion of the work of laying said pipe, the work to be done at his own expense, under Its direction of the Commissioner of Public Works, such permission to continue only during the pleasure of the Common Council.

Adopted by the Board of Aldermen, November 26, 1895, a majority of all the members elect" voting in favor thereof.

Approved by the Mayor, December 6, 1895.

JOHN J. GALLAGHER, Deputy Clerk, Board of Aldermen.

In connection therewith the Comptroller presented the following:

Finance Department, Comptroller's Office, December 18, 1S95. To the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund:

Gentlemen—By a resolution of the Board of Aldermen, adopted November 26. 1895.1 approved by the Mayor December 6, 1895, permission was given G. B. Seeley's Son to lay a shinch iron pipe along West Fifteenth street, from 311 to 319 West Fifteenth street, for tbt purpose of conducting water from a private well at No. 319, as shown on a diagram herein!' submitted, upon payment to the City as compensation for the privilege such amount as may « determined upon as an equivalent therefor by the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund, provided the said G. B. Seeley's Son shall stipulate with the Commissioner of Public Works lo save the City harmless from any loss or damaye thereby given during the progress or subsequent to the completion of laying said pipe.

From an examination made by the Assistant Engineer of the Finance Department, whose report is herewith submitted, it appears that $160 per annum would be a fair charge for the privilege, «ith a fee of $15 for opening the street.

I accordingly submit the following resolution for such action as the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund may deem advisable. Respectfully,

ASH BEL P. FITCH, Comptroller.

Resolved, That the compensation to be paid to the City by G. B. Seeley's Son for the privilege of laying a six inch iron pipe along West Fifteenth street, from 311 to 319 West Fifteenth street, for the purpose of conducting water from a private well at No. 319, shall be one hundred and -ixty dollars ($160) per annum, and a fee of fifteen dollars (S15) for opening the street, to be paid to the Department of Public Works, the opening of the street and the relaying of the pavement to be done at the expense of said G. B. Seeley's Son, under the direction of the Commissioner of Public Works, and subject lo such conditions as he shall prescribe ; provided, also, that the said G. B. Seeley's Sou shall give a satisfactory bond for the faithful performance of all conditions prescribed bv the said Commissioner of Public Works, and by a resolution of the Board of Aldermen passed November 26, 1895, and approved by the Mayor, December 6, 1895, said bond to be approved by the Comptroller and filed in his office; and provided further, that the right be reserved to revoke such permission at any future time, if necessary, in the interest of the City.

The report was accepted and the resolution unanimously adopted.
P. GRATON  WEST TROY NY    ~   FITZGERALD & CO. , AMSTERDAM N.Y.
  MYNDERSE & AINSWORTH, SCHENECTADY N.Y. ~   VERY RARE  M. CURCIO, BALLSTON SPA

 

GURN SPRING COMPANY   ~   SARATOGA SPRINGS NEW YORK

 

ANOTHER PRETTY SCARCE ADDITION TO MY COLLECTION, DUG IN MECHANICVILLE N.Y. AND IN GREAT CONDITION 

THE GURN SPRING, SARATOGA SPRINGS NEW YORK

The two springs at Emerson’s Corners (Gurn Springs) were on Ira Roods property in 1898.  In
   1909 the springs were sold to Leslie A. Cook, who developed the springs and bottled the water.  The Gurn Springs Bottling Plant was in operation in the early part of the 20th century.  Many favored the mineral waters from the springs located near the Snook Kill stream in the north-central part of the town, as they were extremely effervescent.  The photo was taken about 1914 

To the north of Saratoga the Gurn spring apparently emerges from the Little Falls dolomite. The vent is some feet below the capping of gravel and is no longer visible, but the nearest outcrops are all of the dolomite.

0f the geological history of the district from the close of the time marked by the formation of the slates — that is, from the later Ordovicic period — we have but scant records, as will be set forth in the report of Professor dishing and Doctor Ruedemann. Whether other sediments once covered the slates and were then removed by erosion is doubtful. The lack of sediments suggests land conditions at least for the greater part of the time. The strata shared in the mountainous uplifts to some extent, but near the springs the dips are still very flat and notable folds are not immediately concerned with them. Important faulting has taken place and one fault in particular, as will next be described, has an intimate relationship to the springs.

THE WEST END BREWING COMPANY  100 YEARS OF QUALITY    by Jon J. Landers - 1988

HERE IS A GREAT HISTORY ON THE WEST END BREWING CO. WHICH I REMEMBER DRIVING BY AS A KID GROWING UP IN ADIRONDACKS, I ADDED THE PICTURES 

On March 15, 1888 a group of Utica people associated together to form a corporation tomanufacture and sell ale and lager beer. The company’s capital stock was $20,000 and was divided into 200 shares of $100 each. With this petition, The West End Brewing Company of Utica, New York came into existence but any chronicle about this brewery would be incomplete without first reciting the history of Charles Bierbauer and his brewery. Charles Bierbauer was born in Bavaria Germany on February 18, 1818. In 1848 he immigrated to this country locating at Lyons, New York. There he married Barbara Strohm and moved to Utica, New York in 1850. Mr. Bierbauer operated a small brewery at 93 Third Street for three years after relocating to Utica. This location proved to be inadequate and Mr. Bierbauer purchased six lots on Edward Street where a new brewery was erected
and his lager brewing operation was moved. Up until the 1840’s the beer made in the United States was the top-fermented type English ales and porter also called “common beer.” When Charles Bierbauer came to Utica in 1853 he introduced lager beer to the area. The arrival of large numbers of German immigrants during this period created a demand for lager beer. Lager beer is of the “bottom-fermented” type requiring a period of rest which
is the meaning of lager. This resting period develops its taste properties, gives it a sparkling quality and lightens the alcoholic content. Mr. Bierbauer’s business thrived and for many years supplied the bulk of the lager beer consumed in Utica. In 1878, Theodore Matt moved his family to America and settled in Utica where he opened a meat market at 148 Schuyler Street. Mr. Matt’s son, Francis Xavier Matt was age 19 at the time and had
learned the art of making beer in his teenage years at the famed Duke of Baden Brewery in Rothous Germany. Because of his experience in the unrivaled old world method of brewing lager beer, F. X. Matt immediately found employment at the Bierbauer brewery. A year later F.X. Matt was asked to go
to Canajoharie, New York to work for Charles Bierbauer’s brother Louis who had a brewery there. A short time after working at this brewery, F.X. matt was promoted to brew master and continued to work there for seven years. On August 17, 1885 Charles Bierbauer died in Utica at the age of 68. His wife Barbara and adopted son George were unable to continue managing the Bierbauer Brewery and consequently put it up for sale a few months later.
On December 17, 1885 a group of people bought the Bierbauer Brewery and formed The Columbia Brewing Company. They continued operations on Edward Street, the capital stock consisted of $50,000 and the five trustees elected to run the corporation were John Kohler (Barbara Bierbauer’s
brother-in-law), Henry Roemer, M. Bremmer, Frank Schaub and George Fretscher. John Kohler was president of the entity. It is not known why the Columbia Brewing Company failed but competition was plentiful during this period. The company defaulted on their $10,000 mortgage from Barbara
Bierbauer and the company and premises were sold on February 11, 1888 at public auction at the sheriff’s office in Utica. The business and property was bought by the group of men who would transform it into the West End Brewing Company. Included in the sale of the premises were “all the
fixtures, machinery, vats, pipes, hogsheads, barrels, and all other personal property used in and connected with the business of the manufacture and sale of ale and lager, including all the horses, wagons, sleighs, harnesses and other equipment used around said premises.” When the new owners formed the West End Brewing Company they continued operating the brewery on Edward Street. The actual brewing of beer probably never ceased during the transition. The five trustees elected to manage the corporation for the first year were Henry Roemer, Robert Cromie, Sylvester D. Powers, Frank X. Matt, John J. Fuess and George H. Bierbauer. The new owners of the brewery could only raise $17,000 cash when they bought the business and agreed to issue
$3,000 capital stock to Barbara Bierbauer as the balance of the purchase price. Henry Roemer served as the first president and Sylvester Powers owner of the Senate Saloon, 116 Court Street was the first vice President. F.X. Matt returned from the Louis Bierbauer Brewery in Canajoharie to help form the
West End Brewing Company and served as the superintendent and brew master. What part Robert Cromie and J.J. Fuess had in the corporation other than being financial investors is not known. As a company logo and trademark, the West End Brewing Company chose a round circle with an

image of Miss Columbia in it. It seems almost too much of a mere coincidence that an establishment evolving from the Columbia Brewing Company chose Miss Columbia as a trademark. The Columbia Brewing Company probably used the same or similar emblem and the new company continued to use
it. This handsome patriotic motif is still used today by the brewery. When the West End Brewing company started doing business they had to compete with approximately ten other Utica breweries including the well established Gulf and Oneida breweries. The new and larger Eagle Brewing Company started in business the same year as the West End Brewing Company. In addition to Utica breweries, there was competition from many other beers
brought into the area to be sold. The famous Joseph Schlitz Brewing Company and the Genesee Brewing company both sold beer in Utica in 1888.
To make the West End Brewing company a success in 1888 required an aggressive manager not only to produce a quality beer but also to market it. F.X. Matt proved to be this energetic and forceful leader. Under the direction of F.X. Matt, in spite of all the competition, the West End Brewing
Company was very successful. The brewery grew step by step and many extensive improvements to both buildings and equipment took place. With this success F.X. Matt became president in 1905. Mr. Matt continued to be very active in the brewery until his death in 1958 at the age off 99.
Many of the other Utica breweries went out of business during prohibition. The West End Brewing Company survived by selling non alcoholic beverages and other food stuffs. At a special meeting of the stockholders held at the brewery on January 22, 1920 the certificate of incorporation was changed
to include other purposes, powers or provisions “to wit, the manufacture, production and sale of non alcoholic cereal beverages of every description, ginger ale and other soft drinks of every name and nature, ice, cold storage, packing preserves, syrups, vinegar and industrial alcohol, in addition to those
now set forth in the certificate of incorporation.” For 13 years the company survived manufacturing and selling soft drinks and other items.
In 1948, Fortune Magazine described the brewery as “the model brewhouse” and at the present time is recognized as one of the cleanest and most modern breweries in the country. Today the brewery is operating at the same location and is the 12th largest in the nation. The name has been changed to the
F.X. Matt Brewing Company and is the only brewery located in Utica. In addition to its famous Matt’s beer, the company still bottles Utica Club beer under the name of The West End Brewing Company. The company is guided by F.X. Matt II, grandson of the founder. F.X. Matt II is no less proud of his
sparkling light bodied beer than his grandfather was 100 years ago. Like his grandfather, F.X. makes daily tours of the plant inspecting the brewing operation.......

           

ADOLPHUS BUSCH, BASE EMBOSSED COBALT BEER ~ TRIGGE & McCAFFERY, MT. VERNON

TWO OF MY LATEST, COBALT BASE EMBOSSED BUSCH BEER AND RARE TRIGGE & McCAFFERTY "COSSAK KUMYSS" MOUNT VERNON NEW YORK

 

Busch was born in 1839 in Kastel, a district of Wiesbaden in the Grand Duchy of Hesse. He was the second youngest of 22 siblings. The family worked in winery and brewery supplies. He attended the Collegiate Institute of Belgium in Brussels, and left his home in 1857 with three of his brothers for St. Louis, Missouri:   Johann, who established a brewery in Washington, Missouri,


Ulrich Jr, who married another daughter of Eberhard Anheuser, and lived in Chicago, and
Anton, who was a hop dealer, but returned home to Mainz.

His first job in St. Louis was working as a clerk in the commission house. He was also an employee at William Hainrichshofen's wholesale company.   

 He became acquainted with Lilly Anheuser, whose parents had a small brewery which her father Eberhard Anheuser (1805–1880) acquired in 1860, renaming it from the Bavarian Brewery to the E. Anheuser Brewery.  He married 17 year old Lilly Eberhard Anheuser on March 7, 1861 in St. Louis. They had thirteen children, including Adolphus Busch II; August Anheuser Busch I; Carl Busch; and five daughters.

During the American Civil War he served in the United States Army for 14 months. It was at this time that he learned that his father had died and that he had inherited a portion of his father's estate. He used the money to start a wholesale brewer's supply store, and four years later he bought a share in the Bavarian brewery from Eberhard Anheuser, his father-in-law. The company was first called "Anheuser and Company", but at the death of Eberhard Anheuser in 1880, it was changed to"Anheuser Busch Company".   The rapid success of the Anheuser Brewer made its owner independent and permitted him to perform philanthropic activities, such as assisting in the repair of the devastating 1882 flooding of Kastel-Mainz by the Rhine River.

In 1891 Adolphus bought from Carl Conrad the trademark and name Budweiser.

He envisioned a national beer with universal appeal. Toward this end, he created a network of rail-side ice-houses and launched the industry’s first fleet of refrigerated freight cars. Success came when Adolphus found a method to pasteurize the beer so it kept fresh. The beer could now be shipped all over the country. He was also an early adopter of bottled beer. In 1901 sales surpassed the one million barrels of beer benchmark.

In 1912, Busch constructed the Adolphus Hotel in Dallas, Texas, then the tallest building in the state.

The Busches often traveled to Germany where they had a mansion, (named for Mrs. Busch) in Lindschied near Langenschwalbach, Germany (now Bad Schwalbach, Germany);

He died there in Lindschied in 1913 while on vacation. He had been suffering from dropsy since 1906. His body was brought back in 1915 by ship to the United States and then a train to St. Louis and he was buried in Bellefontaine Cemetery in St. Louis

A.B.G.M.Co..Adolphus Busch Glass Mnfg. Company, plants at Belleville, IL (1886-c.1905) and St.Louis, MO (c.1891-1925).

 

J.C. BYARS N. HOOSICK NY.

TWO VERY COMPLETE J.G. BYARS ~ 1882 ~ NORTH HOOSICK N.Y. THERE IS ALSO A HUTCH FROM THIS BOTTLER

 

J. G. BYARS owned a farm located from the north side of Cobble Hill Road to the property now owned by John Calhoun (The Auction barn) north of Telford Road. The well on the property was pure enough to be used in the making of soda water. The J. G. Byars Bottling Company was established in 1877. The Company produced and marketed bottled soda water that became very popular. Some of the bottles with the company name embossed on them are on display at the Louis Miller Museum in Hoosick Falls. When the bottling company ceased to operate, J. G. Byars’ son Gordon ran the farm for some years. The farm house was located at the corner of St. Croix Road and Route 67. The farm house was sold to Fred {PHILLIP W. PERKINS PORCELAIN STOPPER, TANNERSVILLE N.Y.} Dowling and Jean Seffler in the 1930s or early 1940s. The house became a restaurant and bar known as "The OId Byars House". Mr. Dowling left the business and later Jean sold it to a Mr. Safford Rudnick who enlarged it andrenamed it The Merry-Go-Round Bar. Unfortunately, it burned June 10, 1966.

 

L. SPEIDEL & COMPANY BOSTON ~ AGENTS FOR PABST BREWING CO. ~ MILWAUKEE, WIS.

 

 

L. SPEIDEL & CO. BOSTON, MASS.~ BOTTLER AND AGENT FOR PABST BREWING MILWAUKEE. EARLY PART OF 1900'S RANGE 

 

 

 

 

1848

Jacob Best establishes his brewery with capacity of only 18 barrels per batch. In the first year, Best?s brewery produced 300 barrels. 

1850's

Phillip Best takes over. Daughter Maria marries Captain Pabst in 1859. Pabst sells his shipping interests and takes a partnership in the brewery in 1863.

1872

Output was 100,000 barrels; Captain Pabst is President of the Company. Best and Company becomes the second largest brewery in the United States.

 



1880's

Best Select brand receives awards at world and U.S. competitions. In 1882 Pabst adds pieces of blue ribbons tied around the necks of ?Best Select? beer bottles.

1889

Pabst changes name of company to Pabst Brewing Company.

1892

Company purchasing nearly 1 million feet of silk ribbon, which workers tied by hand around each bottle of Best Select Beer.

1895

"Blue Ribbon" officially added to Best Select brand name and in 1899 brand name changed to Pabst Blue Ribbon. Company achieves 1 million barrels in volume, and adds red stripe on label to commemorate. Early 1900?s bring orders of over 30 million feet of silk blue ribbon.

1919-1933 (Prohibition)

Pabst?s cheese making business thrived. By 1930, over 8 million pounds of Pabst-ett brand had been sold. Kraft eventually buys out the Pabst cheese operations.

1934

Pabst opens new brewery in Peoria, Illinois.

1935

Pabst introduces packaged beer in cans.

  

1946-1948

Pabst purchases the Hoffman Beverage Company in Newark in 1946, and Los Angeles Brewing Company in 1948.

1950's

Production and sales soared in the early 1950?s. But after Fred Pabst?s retirement, sales started to slip for Pabst Brewing Company.

 

 

Several unsuccessful campaigns such as "Pabst Blue Ribbon Time" of 1956 and "Pabst Makes It Perfect" campaign of 1957 only stabilized Pabst?s sales.

 
Late 1950's

Lowering prices worked in the short term. Pabst Blue Ribbon known as "The Premium Beer at a Popular Price."

1958-1977

Sales grow from 3.9 million barrels in 1958 to 10.5 million barrels by 1970 and then to all-time high of 18 million barrels in 1977.

1980's

Debt-free balance sheet attractive to corporate raiders. Irwin Jacobs, "The Liquidator" seeks to acquire Pabst. $11 million in legal fees incurred to fight battle.

1984

The board sells to Paul Kalmanowitz, the benefactor of the charitable trust that owns Pabst Brewing Company to this day.

KELLERMANN'S LONG ISLAND ~ GEORGE LAPOINT GLENS FALLS ~ BELLEN BROS. GLENS FALLS

 

E.PRINGLE  TUXEDO PARK NY       EAGLE BREWING  UTICA NY        JOHN ROSSO KINGSTON NY

 

HEDRICK BREWING ALBANY  N Y   ~  DULUTH BREWING & MALTING MINN.   ~   KRETZSCHMAR GLOVERSVILLE N Y  

 HEDRICK Brewery 396/422 Central Avenue, Albany, NY:   John F. Hedrick 1852-1891  Hedrick Brewing Co. 1891-1920   Brewery operations shut down by National Prohibition in 1920   Issued permit L-?? for the production of non-alcoholic beverages during Prohibition 1920   Issued U-Permit No. NY-U-229 allowing the resumption of brewing operations 1933    Hedrick Brewing Co., Inc. 1933-1965     Aka: Regional Brewing Co. 1933-1965


Duluth Brewing & Malting Co.
(29th Ave, West & Helm Street) 1896-1920    Rex Sobriety Co. 1920-1932   Aka: The Rex Co. (L-18) 1920-1932  Brewery operations shut down by Minnesota State Prohibition in 1920   Issued permit L-?? for the production of non-alcoholic beverages during Prohibition 1920   Issued U-Permit No. MN-U-829 allowing the resumption of brewing operations 1933    Duluth Brewing & Malting Co. (Readdressed to 229/303 29th Avenue West & 2902/2916 Helm Street) 1934-1966    Closed in 1966    Status of the building is unknown.
 
Products:
 
Imperial Beer  1896 - 1920    Keg Beer  1896 - 1920    Porter  1896 - 1920    Rex Beer  1896 - 1920    Weiner Beer  1896 - 1920     XXX  1896 - 1920    Royal Brew Beer  1933 - 1938     Castle Brew Beer  1933 - 1942     Karlsbrau Beer  1933 - 1966     Karlsbrau Holiday Beer  1934 - 1936    Karlsbrau Bock  1935 - 1944     Gold Shield Beer  1935 - 1951    Royal Bohemian Beer  1938 - 1958    Royal 58 Beer  1958 - 1965     Rex Select Brew  ?? - ??

 

 E.J. HEFFERNAN  SARATOGA SPRINGS  ~ DEARBORN  NYC  ~ M. MINTZ  GLOVERSVILLE N.Y.

 

 

Heffernan, Edward J., was born in Saratoga Springs, August 29, 1856, a son of Peter and Sarah (Gunning) Heffernan. His mother's father was one of the old landmarks of Saratoga Springs and her brother, John Gunning, was a prominent lawyer. Mr. Heffernan learned the printing trade with B. F. Judson in his boyhood, and in the days of hand composition, before the advent of the typesetting machines, he was one of the most rapid compositors in this part of the country.,working the greater part of the time on the Daily Saratogian. 

He followed this trade from 1869 to 1889, and in September of the latter year embarked in the bottling business, which he has since conducted. Here his energy and enterprise met with swift recognition and prompt success, and he has built up one of the largest and most lucrative trades in his line in that part of the State. He is one of the best known men in public life in Saratoga Springs. He was elected excise commissioner for two terms (six years), and is serving his second term on the board of trustees. He was first elected for the old Second ward and now represents the Fourth ward, the first term being for the years 1892-93, his present term for 1897-98. On April 24, 1878, Mr. Heffernan married Catherine Farrell.  He is a member of the Order of Elks, the Ancient Order of Hibernians, the C. M. B. A. and the Typographical Union.

Mr. Heffernan has always been a straight, sterling and strenuous Democrat, and he is a power in the organization. He served on the Board of Excise Commissioners for many years, and has also been for several terms a member of the village Board of Trustees. He is a strong man, with brains and courage, and his gift for leadership brings him always to the front in every enterprise in which he is engaged. He has been a delegate to the Democratic State Convention and also to many. other conventions, and he has been recognized as one of the most influential Democrats in Saratoga County.

Mr. Heffernan married Miss Catherine Farrell, April 24, 1878. He is very popular, both socially and in business, and has a large army of devoted friends.

GUBNER ~ NYC   ~   FITZGERALD ~ AMSTERDAM   ~   J. MYNDERSE ~ SCHENECTADY   ~  K. HEINRICHS ~ ALBANY

          

 GUBNER & SONS NEW YORK ~ FITZGERALDS BOTTLING WORKS AMSTERDAM N.Y. ~ JOHN MYNDERSE SCHENECTADY N.Y. ~ K.HEINRICHS ALBANY N.Y.

VINCENT,HATHAWAY & CO. BOSTON ~ GINGER ALE

VINCENT HATHAWAY & CO. BOSTON MASS. ROUND BOTTOM BLOB,GINGER ALE BOTTLES IN MOST CASES. THERE ARE QUITE A FEW ROUND BOTTOM  AMERICAN BLOB TOPS. THE IDEA WAS TO KEEP THE CORK WET,THUS EXPANDED KEEPING THE CONTENTS INTACT. IT WAS EFFECTIVE BUT KIND OF A HASSLE TO SERVE!!

1884  MASS. EXIBITION
 Vincent, Hathaway & Co., 105 Broad St., Boston.? Bottled Goods. ? A large and varied exhibition of aerated waters, ginger ales, etc. Quality is of a character deserving of a  Bronze Medal
Vincent Hathaway & Co., Boston, Mass., U. S.
GINGER ALE. Report.?A very successful attempt to produce in this country what so far has been imported at much greater cost, but not much better quality.
Trade Marks Registered During The Week.
Each Trade Mark bearing date 2nd July, 1872 No. 883. Vincent, Hathaway, and Co., of Boston,Mass., for " Ginger ale

 DR. JGB SIEGERT ANGOSTURA BITTERS

 

Dr JGB Siegert, the inventor of Angostura BittersDr JGB Siegert, the inventor of Angostura Bitters >

1824

Dr. Siegert perfects the formula for aromatic bitters ? "AMARGO AROMATICO" to use in his medical practice as Surgeon General to the armies of Simon Bolivar. He resided in the town of Angostura in Venezuela, this town is now called Ciudad Bolivar.

1875

By 1875 the family business moves to Trinidad, now being run by Carlos, Alfredo and Luis Siergert sons of Dr. Siergert - company called Dr. J.G.B. Siegert & Hijos. Bitters manufacturing commences in a small factory in Port of Spain, Trinidad. Angostura bitters now being sold internationally

1903

Carlos Siegert died leaving Alfredo Siegert and his youngest brother, Luis, in possession of the formula and the firm. By 1904, Alfredo Siegert was appointed purveyor of Angostura aromatic bitters to the king of Prussia and in 1907 to King Alfonso XIII of Spain. In 1909, the partnership of J.G.B Siegert & Hijos was converted into a public limited liability company registered in England. In 1912 the company was appointed purveyors of AAB to his majesty King George V.

1921

Angostura Bitters (Dr. J.G.B Siegert & Sons) Limited was formed on August 30, 1921. In 1992, the company changes its name to Angostura Limited which name it retains to date.

 

 SIEGERT et al. v. ABBOTT et al (Supreme Court, General Term, First Department. October 13. 1893.)

1. Trade-Marks?Angostura Bitters.

In an action to restrain the use of a trade-name it appeared that until 1875 plaintiffs' label read "Aromatic Bitters, Prepared by Dr. Siegert, at Angostura." In 1876 the manufacture was removed to Port of Spain, Trinidad. From 1875 to 1884 the label was "Aromatic Bitters, or Angostura Bitters, Prepared by Dr. Siegert, at Angostura, (now Port of Spain, Trinidad.)" In 1884 this label was adjudged false, in not disclosing that Dr. Siegert himself was dead, and that the bitters were no longer made at Angostura, and was changed to "Aromatic Bitters, or Angostura Bitters, Formerly Prepared at Angostura by Dr. Siegert," etc. From 1872 to 1875 G. H. Maynard & Co. made at Baltimore "Angostura Aromatic Bitters," and In 1876 defendants succeeded them, and continued the manufacture and sale. The court found that plaintiffs called their mixture after the place it was made, and did not use the word "Angostura" as descriptive of the article till 1875, three years after Maynard. Defendants testified that their article was so called from its chief Ingredient, Angostura, or cusparia bark. Held, that plaintiffs had no trade-mark In the words "Angostura" or "Angostura Bitters."

2. Same?Imitation.

Plaintiffs and defendants used bottles of like size and shape, but distinguishable to the eye, and with their respective firm names blown in. Plaintiffs' label was clearly printed "Aromatic Bitters, or Angostura Bitters, Formerly Prepared at Angostura, by Dr. Siegert. and now In Port of Spain, Trinidad, by his Sons and Successors, under the old Firm Name of Dr. J. G. B. Siegert & Hijos." Defendants' label was clearly printed: "Angostura Aromatic Bitters, Prepared by O. W. Abbott & Co., 18 Camden Street, Baltimore, Md." The small print following In each case set forth methods and purposes of use not at all Identical. Held, that It was not shown that defendants had simulated plaintiffs' goods with intent to deceive buyers.

Appeal from special term, New York county.

Action by Carlos D. Siegert, Alfredo C. Siegert, and Luis B. 0. Siegert, trading as Dr. J. G. B. Siegert & Hijos, against Cornelius W. Abbott and Cornelius F. Abbott, trading as C. W. Abbott & Co., for injunction. From a judgment restraining defendants from using the words "Angostura Bitters" or "Angostura" as descriptive of bitters made by them, defendant Cornelius F. Abbott appeals. Reversed.

For former report, see 16 N. Y. Supp. 914

The court found that In the year 1824 Dr. Johannes G. B. Siegert, then a resident of the city of Angostura, Venezuela, South America, prepared a cordial or liquor, and about 1830 he engaged at that city in the business of manufacturing and selling the preparation as an article of commerce. The evidence shows that from 1830 to 1864 he continued the manufacture and sale of the article as sole proprietor, and that from the year 1864 to 1S70, when he died, he was engaged in partnership with his son, Carlos D. Siegert. In. the manufacture and sale of the article. After the death of Dr. Siegert, his sons, the present plaintiffs, under the firm name of Dr. J. G. B. Siegert & Hijos, continued the manufacture and sale of the same article. In 1840 the name of the city of Angostura was changed by statute to Cuidad Bolivar, since which time the city has been known by the last-mentioned name. This article was manufactured at the city of Angostura or Cuidad Bolivar until 1876, when the Slegerts ceased to manufacture it at that place, and began to manufacture it at Port of Spain, In the island of Trinidad, where It has ever since been manufactured by them. This article has been put up and sold In bottles of two sizes, quarts and pints, on which were pasted printed wrappers or labels. Prior to 1875, the heading of their label was: "Aromatic Bitters, Prepared by Dr. Siegert, at Angostura, (now Cuidad Bolivar.)" From 1875 to 1884 the label was in the following form: "Aromatic Bitters, or Angostura Bitters, Prepared by Dr. Siegert, at Angostura, (now Port of Spain, Trinidad.)" In 1881, the plaintiffs filed a bill in equity In the state of Maryland to restrain C. W. Abbott & Co. from using their trade-mark or trade-name. They were defeated In this action, upon the ground that their label was false, In not disclosing the fact that Dr. Siegert was dead, and that the article was no longer manufactured at Angostura. 61 Md. 280. After the entry of this Judgment, the Slegerts changed the title of their label, and adopted the label now in use, which is given below. From 1872 to 1875 the firm of G. H. Maynard & Co. manufactured at Baltimore, Md., an article which they sold In the market under the name of "Angostura Aromatic Bitters." Cornelius F. Abbott was a member of tills firm. In 1876, C. W. Abbott & Co. succeeded to the business of G. H. Maynard & Co., and have continued the manufacture and sale at Baltimore of a preparation designated as "Angostura Aromatic Bitters."

Argued before O'BRIEN, FOLLETT, and PARKER, JJ.

Leavitt, Wood & Keith, (John Brooks Leavitt, of counsel,) for appellant.

Arthur Furber, (Frederick R. Coudert, of counsel,) for respondents.

FOLLETT, J. To constitute a valid trade-mark, the designation, or term applied to the article must be one which the claimant has the exclusive right to use. Canal Co. v. Clark, 13 Wall. 311. It is apparent on principle, and it is well settled by authority, that no one can acquire the exclusive right to use a geographical name, or a term which denotes the nature of the article to which it is applied. Caswell v. Davis, 58 N. Y. 223; Keashey v. Chemical Works, (Sup.) 21 N. Y. Supp. 696. The court found that the name "Angostura Bitters" was given by the Siegerts to their mixture because it was manufactured at the city of Angostura It appears from the plaintiffs' evidence that the word "Angostura" did not appear on their labels as descriptive of the article until 1875, three years after G. H. Maynard & Co., the defendants' predecessors, be gan to use the term "Angostura Aromatic Bitters" to designate an article made and sold by them The plaintiffs' agent in this country, who verified the complaint, was sworn on the trial, and testified that since 1878 the bitters made by the Siegerts have been advertised and sold all over the world under the name of "Angostura Bitters." There is some slight evidence, mostly hearsay in its character, that prior to 1875 Siegert's Bitters were sometimes known as "Angostura Bitters." This evidence was given by Wuppermann, who was but 51 years of age at the time of the trial, and left Angostura when 12 years of age, and by Paez, who thinks he first saw the article in 1843. The Siegert memorial tablet, which the plaintiffs put in evidence, states that "in 1824 Dr. Siegert prepared the bitters for his own use, and in 1830 a shipment was sent to Trinidad and to England, but that in 1853 their sale did not exceed twenty dozen bottles per annum." But there is no evidence that the Siegerts applied that name to their compound when put up for sale prior to 1875. It was shown that December 12, 1871, the Siegerts filed in the patent office a so-called "trademark," by which they designated their compound as "Siegert's Angostura Bitters," but there is no evidence that this term was ever applied to the article as sold on the market The filing in the patent office of a device or name as the trade-mark for an article Without afterwards using the emblem or name to denote the article sold is not sufficient to establish the right of the persons filing such a certificate to such trade-mark, and, unless the claimant has actually used the mark or device, he cannot restrain others from using a similar name. Subsequent to 1875 their bitters, when placed on the market, were labeled "Angostura Bitters, Prepared by Dr. Siegert, at Angostura, (now Cuidad Bolivar.)" Though, in 1846, Angostura ceased to be the legal name of the city, it has been since so called, and is carried in geographical gazetteers, in encyclopaedias, and on maps by its former name. Black's Atlas: Johnson's Atlas; Lippincott's Gaz.; Globe Gaz. Whether a word which formerly designated a city or country can be used as a trademark need not now be decided, for the reason that the evidence in this case shows that the defendants, and not the plaintiffs, first used the word "Angostura" to designate an article sold on the markets. Besides, one of the defendants testified?and in this he was not contradicted?that "Angostura bark is the largest ingredient in it, [defendants' mixture,] and it is from that which it takes its name." The other defendant, when speaking of the receipt from which their article was compounded, testified:

"I remember that Angostura bark was one of the articles mentioned In the receipt. Don't recollect what part of the receipt it appeared In. I know It Is probably the biggest thing there."

The word "Angostura" has long been used in medical and scientific works to designate the bark of a South American tree, having well-known medical properties. The following definition of this word is given in Murray's New English Distionary:

"Angustura, or Angostura. A town on the Orinoco, now called Cuidad Bolivar. It gives its name to a biirk, valuable as febrifuge and tonic, the produce of gallpea or cusparla febrifuga, 1791, A. Brande, (title.) 'Experiments and Observations on the Angustura Bark.' 1840, Pereria Mat. Med. 1204: 'Angostura bark was first publicly noticed In the London Medical Journal for 1789." 1SG0, Masters in Treas. Bot. 517: 'The means, chemical and otherwise, of distinguishing the true from the false Angostura barks.' 1879, Miss Braddon, Vixen III., 191: 'Propped up with sherry and Angostura bitters.' 1879, Watts' Diet. Chem. 3rd Suppl. 87: 'Sections of true Angostura bark.' 1881, Syd. Soc. Lex. 'Angostura.'"

The word is defined in the Century Dictionary as follows:

"Angostura or cusparia bark, the product of a rataceons shrub, galipea eusparia, of the mountains of Venezuela; a valuable tonic in dyspepsia, dysentery, and chronic diarrhea. It was formerly prized as a febrifuge, and is now much used In making a kind of bitters. Its use in medicine was discontinued for a time, because of the introduction Into the markets of a false Angostura bark, obtained from the nux vomica tree, which produced fatal effects."

A word or term which truly denotes the nature or the chief ingredient of an article to which it is applied may be used by any manufacturer or producer of such article, though the word or term has been previously used by others to designate a like article which they produced. Caswell v. Davis, 58 N. Y. 223; Keasbey v. Chemical Works, (Sup.) 21 N. Y. Supp. 69G. We think the evidence in the record and the authorities make it plain that the plaintiffs have failed to establish that they have acquired a valid trade-mark by the use which they have made of the word "Angostura" standing alone, or as combined by them with other words. Have the defendants, by the mode in which they have put up and described their fluid, deceitfully induced purchasers to believe that they were buying the article manufactured by the plaintiffs, instead of the one manufactured by the defendants; or is the defendants' method of bottling, labeling, and describing their article likely, in the future, to induce purchasers exercising reasonable prudence to purchase and use the defendants' mixture upon the belief that it is the plaintiffs', and so injure the plaintiffs' business? When a trade-mark acquired by one person is used, though innocently, by another, the latter becomes liable for the damages caused, and may be restrained from using the device. But when one seeks to restrain another from using a trade-name, or from putting up and selling goods in any way calculated to induce purchasers to believe that they are buying goods which were manufactured by the complainant, the right of recovery rests upon the theory that a false representation has been made. The rule is well stated in Manufacturing Co. v. Wilson, 2 Ch. Div. 434. When this action was begun, the litigants were selling their compounds in quart and pint bottles, made of glass, v.2oN.y.s.no.5?38